Adler University MAMP 509A Gulf War Syndrome

Adler University MAMP 509A Gulf War Syndrome ORDER NOW FOR CUSTOMIZED AND ORIGINAL ESSAY PAPERS ON Adler University MAMP 509A Gulf War Syndrome [6.1] Gulf War Syndrome and Agent Orange Exposure Discussion Explain the primary issues relating to the U.S. Governments handling of the Gulf War Syndrome and the issues relating to the handling of the Vietnam period Agent Orange exposure on the veteran population. Use the readings and references to support your discussion. Adler University MAMP 509A Gulf War Syndrome 250 words to include references and citations Kilshaw, S. (2008). Gulf War Syndrome: A Reaction to Psychiatry’s Invasion of the Military? (Links to an external site.) Links to an external site. Culture, Medicine & Psychiatry , 32 (2), 219–237. https://doi-org.ezproxy.adler.edu/10.1007/s11013-0… attachment_1 attachment_2 Adler School of Professional Psychology M.A. in Military Psychology (online) MAMP 509 Department of Defense and VA Health Care Systems “Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) from Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) The Signature Injury of the Iraq/Afghanistan War” Presentation By… Joseph E. Troiani, Ph.D., CADC Director – M.A. Military Psychology (online) Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology Founder of Military Psychology @ Adler Adler School of Professional Psychology Commander, United States Navy (retired) [email protected] Creation of the Term “Shell Shock” ? Because the military thought it unfitting to diagnose combat soldiers with a hysteria (female illness) the military decided to create a new term “shell shock” for a soldier’s symptoms in order to differentiate a male’s constellation of combat trauma symptoms from a women’s known hysteria. Shell Shock… The cause of “shell shock” was attributed to the shock waves emanating from exploding shells which the military concluded caused actual physiological damage to soldiers in close proximity, even though the bodies did not sustain external injuries. Shell Shock Victims… Traumatic Brain Injury Cause of TBI’s Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Attacks IED Attacks on the United States Military Aftermath of IED Attacks The Threat of Improvised Explosive Devices ? ? The improvised explosive devices or IEDs as they are referred to are easily constructed from common and available materials. IEDs are the major cause of death and injury in the Iraq/Afghanistan war along with what had been referred to as the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT). Why the Use of Improvised Explosive Devices ? Low-cost ? Easily Disguised ? Hard to spot while traveling at convoy speeds. ? Low Risk of Exposure or Detection ? An Efficient Psychological Warfare Tactic IED Components Explosives Chemical Agents IED Design Examples of IED Disguises: Vehicles-borne IEDs ? VBIEDs can be trucks, taxis, stolen police cars, broken military equipment, mobile food carts, etc. Examples of IED Disguises: Canisters ? Soda cans, water bottles, MRE packs, water heaters, propane tanks, etc. Examples of IED Disguises: Roadside Debris ? Cement pieces, dead animals, trash, gravel piles, tires, car parts, toys, soccer balls, etc. Examples of IED Disguises: Pipes ? Guardrails, irrigation ditches, oil and gas lines, power conduits, sewage pipes, etc. Examples of IED Disguises: Bags ? Plastic bags, burlap sacks, garbage, plastic sheeting, blankets, etc. Examples of IED Disguises: Packages ? Boxes, wood crates, ammo boxes, coffins, etc. Suicide Bombers Chapter 13 “Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)” ? ? Bret A. Moore, Psy.D., ABPP is a former active duty U.S. Army Psychologist and a two-tour veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom. During his 27 months in Iraq he earned the Bronze Star. Carrie H. Kennedy, Ph.D., ABPP is a Commander in the Medical Service Corp of the U.S. Navy. She is currently serving at the Naval Aerospace Medical Institute. Four Types of Blast Effects… ? ? Primary: What happens to the human body because of the highly pressured blast wave itself. Secondary: Refers to when a person is thrown in the air because of the blast and then injures themselves because of the impact against an object or the ground. Blast Effects Continue… ? ? Tertiary: Is the damage done when other things are thrown in the air because of the force of the blast and then hits the person. Quaternary: Includes other kinds of injuries related to an explosion (e.g. being burned or inhaling toxic fumes). Types of Traumatic Brain Injury ? ? Adler University MAMP 509A Gulf War Syndrome Penetrating: The outer layer of the meninges is pierced by shrapnel, bullets or other objects. Severe: It is characterized by a confused state which last more than 24 hours, loss of consciousness for more than 24 hours, and memory loss for more than seven days, Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center Between January 1, 2001 and September 30, 2013 more than 265,000 United States military personnel have suffered traumatic brain injury of which most were mild concussions. Some 26,250 however suffered penetrating head wounds or brain injuries. Saved Not Cured Brain-Injured Vets Search for Solace “Advances in battlefield medicine keep alive troops with severe head wounds, but there are still no cures.” The Wall Street Journal February 20, 2014 Symptoms of a TBI Injury ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Headaches Dizziness Unsteadiness on the Feet Slurred Speech Confusion Memory Problems Attention Problems Slowed Thinking Symptoms Continued… ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Mental and Physical Fatigue Lowered Frustration Tolerance Irritability Apathy or Poor Motivation Depression Disturbance in Sleep Nausea Vomiting If We Don’t Ask… They Won’t Tell ? ? ? It is important for treatment providers to recognize that traumatic events leave their imprints on patients. The experience of combat may compound the effects of previous trauma. If clinicians don’t inquire about the effects of a traumatic event, many patients will not discuss them. Behavioral Health Treatment Programs and Trauma Issues ? ? ? ? Treatment programs should routinely assess patients for histories of traumatic events and for the diagnosis of PTSD. Treatment programs should offer therapeutic experiences designed to focus on histories of trauma and of PTSD. Treatment programs should be able to screen and access for TBI. Treatment programs should be prepared to address the needs of veterans. “When we forget our warriors our society will begin to crumble.” Sir Winston S. Churchill The Tongue and Quill AFH 33-337 27 May 2015 Air Force Core Values Integrity First, Service Before Self, and Excellence in All We Do. Acknowledgement The Tongue and Quill has been a valued Air Force resource for decades and many Airmen from our Total Force of uniformed and civilian members have contributed their talents to various editions over the years. This revision is built upon the foundation of governing directives and user’s inputs from the unit level all the way up to Headquarters Air Force. A small team of Total Force Airmen from the Air University, the United States Air Force Academy, Headquarters Air Education and Training Command (AETC), the Air Force Reserve Command (AFRC), Air National Guard (ANG), and Headquarters Air Force compiled inputs from the field and rebuilt The Tongue and Quill to meet the needs of today’s Airmen. The team put many hours into this effort over a span of almost two years to improve the content, relevance, and organization of material throughout this handbook. As the final files go to press it is the desire of The Tongue and Quill team to say thank you to every Airman who assisted in making this edition better; you have our sincere appreciation! –The Tongue and Quill Team BY ORDER OF THE AIR FORCE HANDBOOK 33-337 SECRETARY OF THE AIR FORCE 27 MAY 2015 Communications and Information THE TONGUE AND QUILL ACCESSIBILITY: Publications and forms are available for downloading or ordering on the e-Publishing website at http://www.e-publishing.af.mil. RELEASABILITY: There are no releasability restrictions on this publication. OPR: SAF/CIO A6SS Supersedes: AFH33-337, 1 August 2004 Certified by: SAF/CIO A6SS (Col Heather L. McGee) Pages: 378 The men and women of the United States Air Force must communicate clearly and effectively to carry out our missions. Although we live in an era of rapid personal and mass communication that was barely imagined just a few years ago, our Air Force still requires face-to-face briefings, background papers, and staff packages to keep the mission moving forward. This handbook, together with Air Force Manual (AFMAN) 33-326, Adler University MAMP 509A Gulf War Syndrome Preparing Official Communications, provides the information to ensure clear communications—written or spoken. Send recommended changes or comments using AF Form 847, Recommendation for Change of Publication, to the Air Force Cyberspace Strategy & Policy Division (SAF/CIO A6SS) at [email protected] Ensure that all records created as a result of processes prescribed in this publication are maintained IAW AFMAN 33-363, Management of Records, and disposed of IAW the Air Force Records Disposition Schedule (RDS) in the Air Force Records Information Management System (AFRIMS). The use of the name or mark of any specific manufacturer, commercial product, commodity, or service in this publication does not imply endorsement by the Air Force. SUMMARY OF REVISIONS This edition has been substantially revised to 1) standardize the format and layout for readability; 2) improve the organization of chapters and content within each chapter; 3) provide additional material on preparing to write and speak, writing with focus, communicating to persuade, research, meetings, briefings and listening; 4) clarify guidance for Air Force written products with formatted examples for each product; 5) add information on Air Force written products such as awards, decorations and performance reports; and 6) update guidance for electronic communications. The Tongue and Quill AFH 33-337, 27 MAY 2015 Table of Contents PART I: COMMUNICATION BASICS ……………………………………………………………………….. 1 Plain Language Requirement: It’s the Law ………………………………………………………………………………… 2 Plain Language in the Air Force: Be Clear, Concise and Specific ………………………………………………… 2 CHAPTER 1: A Basic Philosophy of Communication ……………………………………………………. 3 What Do We Mean by Communication? ……………………………………………………………………………………. 4 Communication, Teamwork and Leadership……………………………………………………………………………….. 5 Principles of Effective Communication ……………………………………………………………………………………… 5 CHAPTER 2: Seven Steps to Effective Communication (Overview) ………………………………. 8 Preparing to Write and Speak (Steps 1-4) …………………………………………………………………………………… 9 Drafting, Editing, and Feedback (Steps 5-7) ……………………………………………………………………………… 11 Seven Steps to Effective Communication: Quick Reference List ………………………………………………… 13 PART II: PREPARING TO WRITE AND SPEAK ……………………………………………………… 14 CHAPTER 3: Step 1 (Analyze Purpose and Audience) ………………………………………………… 15 Key Questions ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 16 What Is My Purpose? …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 16 Drafting a Purpose Statement ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 17 Analyzing Purpose: Other Issues …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 18 Audience Analysis: The Human Factor……………………………………………………………………………………. 18 Tips For Success ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 20 CHAPTER 4: Step 2 (Research Your Topic) ……………………………………………………………….. 23 Start Smart ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 24 Getting Data………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 25 Search Engines and Databases Adler University MAMP 509A Gulf War Syndrome ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 26 Evaluate Your Sources …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 30 Useful Online Resources ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 31 CHAPTER 5: Step 3 (Support Your Ideas) …………………………………………………………………. 41 The Logic of Arguments: Fundamentals ………………………………………………………………………………….. 42 Evidence: Proving Your Point ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 44 Characteristics of Good Supporting Evidence……………………………………………………………………………. 45 Logical Errors: Flawed Arguments …………………………………………………………………………………………. 46 Arguments, Truth and Persuasion ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 52 CHAPTER 6: Step 4 (Organize and Outline) ………………………………………………………………. 53 Organizing: Finalizing Your Purpose Statement and Bottom Line ………………………………………………. 54 The Outline: Why Do I Need One? …………………………………………………………………………………………. 55 Outlining the Body: Pick a Pattern ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 59 – ii – The Tongue and Quill AFH 33-337, 27 MAY 2015 PART III: WRITING WITH FOCUS …………………………………………………………………………. 63 CHAPTER 7: Step 5 (Draft) ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 65 Drafting: Basic Philosophy…………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 66 Drafting Effective Paragraphs …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 69 Drafting Effective Sentences …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 73 Overcoming Writer’s Block ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 90 CHAPTER 8: Step 6 (Edit) …………………………………………………………………………………………. 91 Editing vs. Feedback ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 92 Editing Fundamentals …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 92 Editing Efficiently: A Three-Step Approach …………………………………………………………………………….. 93 Drafting Basics: Did You Apply Them? …………………………………………………………………………………..Adler University MAMP 509A Gulf War Syndrome 96 Common Grammar Traps ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 97 Common Writing Errors ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 101 CHAPTER 9: Step 7 (Fight for Feedback and Get Approval) ……………………………………. 103 Fighting For Feedback ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 104 Getting Approval: Staff Coordination ……………………………………………………………………………………. 106 PART IV: FACE-TO-FACE COMMUNICATION ……………………………………………………. 110 CHAPTER 10: Air Force Speaking …………………………………………………………………………… 111 Verbal Communication ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 112 Non-Verbal Communication …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 113 Overcoming Anxiety: Some Simple Steps ……………………………………………………………………………… 114 Common Nonverbal Quirks ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 115 Delivery Formats: Impromptu, Prepared and Manuscript …………………………………………………………. 115 Preparing Your Slides…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 118 CHAPTER 11: Effective Listening Strategies …………………………………………………………….. 123 Understanding Hearing and Listening …………………………………………………………………………………….. 124 Informative, Critical and Empathic Listening ………………………………………………………………………….. 125 Better Listening …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 129 Overcoming Barriers to Listening ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 130 PART V: WORKPLACE CHALLENGES ………………………………………………………………… 133 CHAPTER 12: Electronic Communications and Social Media …………………………………… 134 Electronic Mail (E-Mail) ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 135 Social Media ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 143 Instant Messaging (IM) and Texting ………………………………………………………………………………………. 147 Telephones, Voice Mail and Fax ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 149 Electronic Communications Glossary …………………………………………………………………………………….. 152 – iii – The Tongue and Quill AFH 337, 27 MAY 2015 CHAPTER 13: Meetings …………………………………………………………………………………………… 155 Planning an Effective Meeting ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 156 Running Your Meeting …………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 159 Group Dynamics and Fun ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 161 PART VI: DOCUMENT STANDARDS …………………………………………………………………….. 163 CHAPTER 14: The Official Memorandum ……………………………………………………………….. 165 The Heading Section …………………………………………………………………….. … Get a 10 % discount on an order above $ 100 Use the following coupon code : NURSING10

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