Ashford How Do Modern Parents Deal with Cultural Beliefs

Ashford How Do Modern Parents Deal with Cultural Beliefs Ashford How Do Modern Parents Deal with Cultural Beliefs THIS IS A ARTICLE CRITIQUE PAPER TURNITIN SCORE MUST BE BELOW AND NOT ABOVE 20%//PROVIDE SCREEN SHOT OF YOUR SCORE The article and template is within attached files. Use template and article Anggraenl, M. D., Ajl, B., Setlyanl, R., Kartlkasarl, A., & Rahmawatl, E. (2018). How do modern parents deal with cultural beliefs about breastfeeding? A qualitative study. British Journal of Midwifery, 26 (9), 605-613. Prior to beginning work on this assignment, review the assigned readings and the instructor guidance for the week, read the Writing Center resource Writing an Article Critique (Links to an external site.) , and view the tutorial How to Read a Scholarly Article (Links to an external site.) . Your instructor will post an announcement with the reference for the qualitative research study to be critiqued in this assignment. After reading the posted study, use the Qualitative Research Critique Template to compose and organize your assignment. PSY326 Ashford How Do Modern Parents Deal with Cultural Beliefs In your paper, Summarize the research question, methods, and findings of the assigned qualitative study. Evaluate the appropriateness of the research methods and analytical approaches used in the study. Support the position with evidence cited from the textbook and at least one other scholarly source about the research design or method. Analyze ethical issues pertaining to how the study was carried out. Critique the strengths, weaknesses, and limitations of the study. Recommend a research question and methods for a follow-up study on the topic. Utilize the provided template with section headings. The Qualitative Research Critique paper Must be four to five double-spaced pages in length (not including title and references pages) using the template provided and formatted according to APA style. The template is a Word document that is pre-formatted in APA style. Must utilize academic voice. See the Academic Voice . Must include an introduction and conclusion paragraph. Your introduction paragraph needs to end with a clear thesis statement that indicates the purpose of your paper. Must include a separate title page with the following: Title of paper Student’s name Course name and number Instructor’s name Date submitted qualitative_research_critique_template__1_.docx article_for_week_three.pdf ORDER NOW FOR CUSTOMIZED AND ORIGINAL ESSAY PAPERS Running head: QUALITATIVE RESEARCH CRITIQUE Qualitative Research Critique [Student’s Name] PSY 326 Research Design [Instructor’s Name] [Date submitted] 1 QUALITATIVE RESEARCH CRITIQUE 2 Qualitative Research Critique Introduction [Instructions for using this template: Replace the text in brackets on the title page with your information. Answer the questions and provide the required information indicated below, in the order these items are presented. Use complete sentences in your response and delete the question or instruction, including this paragraph, after you have finished typing your answers. Throughout the paper, cite the source of the information. List the references for all sources that are cited, as indicated in the note on the References page.] What is your purpose for writing this paper? What is the title of the study you are critiquing, and who are the authors? Summarize the research question(s) in your own words as much as possible. If your instructor allows quotes and you find it necessary to quote from the article, use quotation marks around the quoted passage and cite the quote in APA format with author’s last name, year of publication, and page number where the quoted material appeared. Briefly summarize background information on the topic from the study’s literature review. Comment on whether or not there is any apparent bias in the selection of studies in the literature review. Summary of Methods Which qualitative research design was used? Name the sampling method and describe how the participants were selected. QUALITATIVE RESEARCH CRITIQUE 3 How did the researchers collect data from the participants? Did the researchers mention bracketing, epoché, or reflexivity? What coding and analysis procedures were used to analyze the data? What efforts were made to ensure trustworthiness, credibility, and/or dependability? Summary of Findings What themes or other findings were presented in the study? Was sufficient evidence provided to support the conclusions drawn by the researchers? If so, what is the nature of the evidence? If not, what is missing? Ethical Aspects Did the researchers explicitly address ethical issues in the article? If not, was there evidence in the report that the participants’ wellbeing and confidentiality were protected? Was an approval process by an Institutional Review Board or similar ethics review committee mentioned? Were any of the practices ethically questionable? If so, what could have been done to resolve these issues? Evaluation of Study Referring to a source about the research design and methods used in this study to support your evaluation, do you feel the researchers used these methods appropriately to investigate the research question? What do you see as the strengths of how this study was done? QUALITATIVE RESEARCH CRITIQUE 4 What limitations or weaknesses were mentioned by the authors? What limitations do you see (if any) that they did not mention? What suggestions did the authors make for future research on the topic? Do you think another approach might be better for the research question than the research design and methods that were used in this study? If so, what other methods would you consider? Conclusion Briefly review the main points of your summary and evaluation of the study. What would you recommend for a research question and methods for a follow-up study on this topic? QUALITATIVE RESEARCH CRITIQUE 5 References [Note: List references here in alphabetical order by the first author’s last name, in APA format with a hanging indent. Include all sources cited in the body of the paper. Do not list any that are not cited in the paper. PSY326 Ashford How Do Modern Parents Deal with Cultural Beliefs At a minimum, you should use the article being critiqued, one article about the research design from the Research Methods research guide in the Ashford Library, and the course textbook. An example citation featuring the textbook follows this note.] Newman, M. (2016). Research methods in psychology. (2nd ed.). San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education. Research How do modern parents deal with cultural beliefs about breastfeeding? A qualitative study © 2018 MA Healthcare Ltd T he majority of infant morbidity and mortality occurs in developing countries (UNICEF, 2018). Indonesia is one of the countries with high infant morbidity and mortality rates (Indonesian Ministry of Health, 2015). The primary cause of infant death is contraction of an infectious disease, which may be prevented by providing an appropriate infant feeding regimen (UNICEF, 2018). Breastfeeding is a cheap and easy way to reduce infant morbidity and mortality rates (UNICEF, 2018). Breastfeeding is known to be the best nutrition for infants. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that every mother breastfeeds exclusively for 6 months and then to continue breastfeeding for up to 2 years (WHO, 2017); however, the exclusive breastfeeding rate in Indonesia is only 45% (Indonesian Ministry of Health, 2015). Previous studies have highlighted the effects of cultural beliefs on breastfeeding practice (Osman et al, 2009; Sharma et al, 2016), and have shown that exclusive breastfeeding practices among Indonesian mothers are affected by cultural beliefs related to breastfeeding (Rejeki, 2010). Cultural beliefs related to breastfeeding have been identified as a possible explanation for the differences in breastfeeding practices (Gibson et al, 2005). Different ethnic groups may have different beliefs, attitudes, and practices regarding nutrition and breastfeeding, even though they may live in the same region. The majority of Indonesians are of Javanese ethnicity (40.2%) and most live in Central Java Province, which is the third most populous province in Indonesia (Nuraini et al, 2016). Javanese cultural beliefs strongly influence breastfeeding practices among Javanese mothers (Choiriyah et al, 2015); however, there is little data on the cultural beliefs about breastfeeding among young and modern mothers in Java. Identifying sensitive cultural beliefs directly helps health professionals to collect data regarding cultural beliefs that may affect community behaviour (Abramson, 1992). In Java there are many myths, taboos, rituals and customs related to the breastfeeding period (Choiriyah et al, 2015). Some cultural beliefs are safe and provide British Journal of Midwifery, September 2018, Vol 26, No 9 Abstract Background Cultural beliefs strongly affect the practice of breastfeeding. Interpretations of cultural beliefs change over time, particularly among modern parents; however, knowledge of these changes is limited. Aim To explore cultural beliefs related to breastfeeding and modern Indonesian parents’ perceptions. Methods This article reports on the cultural beliefs about breastfeeding from an ethnographic study of 23 participants. Data were collected using focus group discussions, in-depth interviews and observations, and analysed using thematic analysis. Findings Analysis revealed four main themes: ‘suggested food and behaviour’; ‘restricted food and behaviour’; ‘consequences of avoiding taboos’ and ‘the dynamic change in cultural beliefs’. Conclusions Healthcare providers can use the results of this study to develop a culturally sensitive educational programmes that are congruent with modern parents’ needs. PSY326 Ashford How Do Modern Parents Deal with Cultural Beliefs Keywords Cultural beliefs | Breastfeeding | Indonesia Mekar Dwi Anggraeni Lecturer, Nursing Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, Jenderal Soedirman University, Indonesia Budi Aji Lecturer, Public Health Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, Jenderal Soedirman University, Indonesia Rahmi Setiyani Lecturer, Nursing Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, Jenderal Soedirman University, Indonesia Aprilia Kartikasari Lecturer, Nursing Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, Jenderal Soedirman University, Indonesia Eni Rahmawati Lecturer, Nursing Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, Jenderal Soedirman University, Indonesia [email protected] 605 Research benefits for mothers and infants, but others are harmful (Ergenekon-Ozelci et al, 2006). Identifying cultural beliefs about breastfeeding is therefore important in order to promote maternal and infant health. Cultural beliefs have been shown to affect health practice (Leininger, 2002). Health professionals should have the abillity to provide culturally congruent care (Garneau and Pepin, 2015). Exclusive breastfeeding promotion strategies should fit with the population and its characteristics (WHO, 2018). Therefore, having an understanding of cultural beliefs is important for healthcare providers in providing culturally sensitive care, better support and appropriate counselling to breastfeeding mothers (Osman et al, 2009). Little is known about the cultural beliefs around breastfeeding in the modern Javanese community, so a qualitative study was conducted to explore the cultural beliefs about breastfeeding.The results of this study are expected to lead to the development of a culturally sensitive educational programme for the young Javanese mothers in Indonesia. Women in the key participant group were primiparous and multiparous, had undergone vaginal and caesarian births, and had delivered both term and preterm babies. All participants were Javanese-born, residing in Central Java Province, able to communicate verbally and willing to participate. They all signed an informed consent form. General participants in this study included family members, midwives and traditional birth attendants. According to Morse (1994), a qualitative study requires about 30-50 participants including key and general participants; however, if the study has reached saturation, the number of participants can be fewer (Morse, 2000). The number of participants in this study was 23 because saturation was reached with the 23rd participant. Purpose The purpose of this study was to explore cultural beliefs on breastfeeding and modern parents’ perceptions of these cultural beliefs in Central Java Province, Indonesia. This study will help healthcare providers to improve their knowledge and provide culturally sensitive care in Central Java Province, Indonesia. Ethical considerations This study received ethical approval from an institutional review board, and the researcher received permission to conduct this study from the Government Office. All participants were asked to sign the informed consent form after being provided with information about the study, its purpose, benefits, potential risks, anonymity, confidentiality, the rights of study participants and the researchers’ contact details. PSY326 Ashford How Do Modern Parents Deal with Cultural Beliefs The researchers approached the study with empathy, allowing the interviews to be interrupted when babies became fussy or needed feeding, or when mothers needed to cook for another child. Study design This study was conducted using an ethnographic approach. Ethnography is a research method that provides a chance to understand the social constructs of customs, behaviour, language and interactions (Creswell, 2012). Cultural beliefs on breastfeeding were explored from the perspective of young Javanese mothers, their family members, health professionals and traditional birth attendants (TBAs).These cultural beliefs included beliefs on food, behaviour, myths, taboos and customs. All of the researchers were Javanese, lived in Central Java Province, and spoke the same language as the participants, which may have helped the researchers to understand, describe and interpret the meanings, situations and events. Study participants The researchers used both purposive and snowball sampling methods to select both key and general participants. Researchers contacted community health volunteers, who then recommended women for inclusion in the study.The researchers met potential participants at their homes, provided information about the study and asked women if they woud be interested in participating. 606 Data collection Data were collected from March to September 2017. The researchers used multiple data collection methods until data saturation was reached. This included focus group discussions, in-depth interviews, observations and document-related sources. Data were collected and analysed using thematic analysis (Braun and Clarke, 2012). The natural setting is important in an ethnographic study (Creswell, 2013), and so after receiving study approval and permission, the researchers approached the proposed participants to build rapport, provide study-related information and ask for their willingness to participate in this study. All participants then signed the informed consent form to show that they understood and wanted to participate in this study. The focus group discussions and interview guides were based on previous knowledge related to the phenomena. They were peer-reviewed and pilot-tested before being used to collect the data. The focus group discussion British Journal of Midwifery, September 2018, Vol 26, No 9 © 2018 MA Healthcare Ltd Method Study setting This study was conducted in a community setting on Java Island, which is the most populous island in Indonesia. Central Java Province is the third most populous province in Indonesia, and Javanese is the largest ethnic group (40.2%) in the country (Nuraini et al, 2016). Research Adobe Stock/Aqnus © 2018 MA Healthcare Ltd This study sought to examine what influenced modern Indonesian mothers to breastfeed guide included mothers’ perceptions of breastfeeding and exclusive breastfeeding, cultural beliefs related to breastfeeding, suggestions given during breastfeeding, and myths, taboos and customs. The interview guide for the grandmothers, TBAs and healthcare providers focused on the cultural beliefs related to breastfeeding and their experiences on caring for breastfeeding mothers. The researchers conducted two focus group discussions involving 18 breastfeeding mothers. This method was chosen since it allows for spontaneous and informal discussions of the participants’ everyday lives and allows for participants to add further information to others’ statements. The participants were selected by the diversity of their individual characteristics, and included both primiparous and multiparous women, vaginal and caesarean births, working and stay-at-home mothers, nuclear and extended family, and women living in both urban and rural areas.The researchers approached 11 mothers to be interviewed in-depth and observed in their homes, since they were more knowledgeable, had richer experiences or particular issues that could not be expressed in front of the other participants. In addition, grandmothers, TBAs and healthcare providers were interviewed and observed in order to explore their cultural beliefs on breastfeeding and their experiences caring for breastfeeding mothers. Each participant was interviewed three to four times. PSY326 Ashford How Do Modern Parents Deal with Cultural Beliefs British Journal of Midwifery, September 2018, Vol 26, No 9 The researchers collected data from the participants until no new information emerged, and no new category was raised when the researchers added more participants to the study. According to Creswell (2013), sufficient data in a qualitative study is acquired when saturation is reached. In this study, saturation was reached with the 23rd participant. The researchers started the focus group discussions and interviews, moving from general questions to more specific questions regarding cultural beliefs on breastfeeding. The researchers conducted focus group discussions and interviews based on the participants’ available time. The researchers also observed and took note of the participants’ activities and home situations while taking in-depth interviews. All focus group discussions and interviews were recorded with the participants’ permission.They were transcribed verbatim for data analysis and will be erased after publication. Data analysis The researchers analysed the data gained from the focus group discussions and in-depth interviews. After the data were transcribed verbatim, the researchers analysed them using qualitative thematic analysis (Braun and Clarke, 2012). According to Braun and Clark (2012), qualitative thematic analysis includes reading the data repeatedly, giving initial codes, finding the themes, reviewing 607 Research Table 1. Demographic characteristics of participants (n=23) Code Age (years) Parity Educational level Employment Marital Status Role R1 30 Multiparous Bachelor’s degree Housewife Married Key informant R2 22 Primiparous High school Housewife Married Key informant R3 31 Multiparous High school Housewife Married Key informant R4 23 Primiparous Middle school Housewife Married Key informant R5 29 Multiparous High school Housewife Married Key informant R6 33 Multiparous Middle school Housewife Married Key informant R7 21 Primiparous High school Housewife Married Key informant R8 62 Multiparous Elementary Housewife Married General informant R9 31 Multiparous Bachelor’s degree Housewife Married Key informant R10 28 Multiparous High school Privately employed Married Key informant R11 54 Multiparous Middle school Housewife Married General informant R12 32 Multiparous Middle school Housewife Married Key informant R13 21 Primiparous High school Housewife Married Key informant R14 22 Primiparous High school Housewife Married Key informant R15 34 Multiparous Middle school Housewife Married Key informant R16 30 Multiparous High school Housewife Married Key informant R17 28 Multiparous High school Housewife Married Key informant R18 32 Multiparous Middle school Housewife Married Key informant R19 22 Primiparous High school Housewife Married Key informant R20 37 Multiparous Diploma Midwife Married General informant R21 64 Multiparous Elementary TBA Widowed General informant R22 30 Multiparous Diploma Privately employed Married Key informant R23 59 Multiparous Elementary Housewife Widowed General informant themes, defining and naming themes and writing the report. Becoming familiar with the data provides an opportunity for the researchers to gain knowledge regarding cultural beliefs on breastfeeding among young Javanese women. The researchers then grouped the data based on the research questions. The codes guided the researchers to develop themes and sub-themes connected with the research questions. Trustworthiness In a qualitative study there are four elements to trustworthiness: credibility, transferability, dependability and confirmability (Lincoln and Guba, 2007). To ensure credibility, the researchers should spend prolonged periods of time in the research field. All of the researchers in this study are Javanese and have been in Central Java Province 608 for a long time. Research methods included participant observation, peer debriefing, member checking and triangulation. Triangulation methods were used in this study and data were collected through focus group discussions, in-depth interviews and observations (Carter et al, 2014).The researchers also used triangulation sources to collect data involving breastfeeding mothers, family members, traditional birth attendants and healthcare providers. To ensure transferability, the researchers provided a detailed description about the participant’s characteristics and the research method. To ensure dependability, the researchers allowed the participants to read the verbatim text, preliminary themes, and final themes. The research team also discussed the verbatim text, codes, preliminary themes and final themes to find a similar conclusion, which ensured confirmability. The British Journal of Midwifery, September 2018, Vol 26, No 9 © 2018 MA Healthcare Ltd TBA: traditional birth attendant Research researchers also checked, discussed and analysed the data with local experts in breastfeeding who were all … Purchase answer to see full attachment Student has agreed that all tutoring, explanations, and answers provided by the tutor will be used to help in the learning process and in accordance with Studypool’s honor code & terms of service . Get a 10 % discount on an order above $ 100 Use the following coupon code : NURSING10

Read more

Ashford How Do Modern Parents Deal with Cultural Beliefs

Ashford How Do Modern Parents Deal with Cultural Beliefs Ashford How Do Modern Parents Deal with Cultural Beliefs THIS IS A ARTICLE CRITIQUE PAPER TURNITIN SCORE MUST BE BELOW AND NOT ABOVE 20%//PROVIDE SCREEN SHOT OF YOUR SCORE The article and template is within attached files. Use template and article Anggraenl, M. D., Ajl, B., Setlyanl, R., Kartlkasarl, A., & Rahmawatl, E. (2018). How do modern parents deal with cultural beliefs about breastfeeding? A qualitative study. British Journal of Midwifery, 26 (9), 605-613. Prior to beginning work on this assignment, review the assigned readings and the instructor guidance for the week, read the Writing Center resource Writing an Article Critique (Links to an external site.) , and view the tutorial How to Read a Scholarly Article (Links to an external site.) . Your instructor will post an announcement with the reference for the qualitative research study to be critiqued in this assignment. After reading the posted study, use the Qualitative Research Critique Template to compose and organize your assignment. PSY326 Ashford How Do Modern Parents Deal with Cultural Beliefs In your paper, Summarize the research question, methods, and findings of the assigned qualitative study. Evaluate the appropriateness of the research methods and analytical approaches used in the study. Support the position with evidence cited from the textbook and at least one other scholarly source about the research design or method. Analyze ethical issues pertaining to how the study was carried out. Critique the strengths, weaknesses, and limitations of the study. Recommend a research question and methods for a follow-up study on the topic. Utilize the provided template with section headings. The Qualitative Research Critique paper Must be four to five double-spaced pages in length (not including title and references pages) using the template provided and formatted according to APA style. The template is a Word document that is pre-formatted in APA style. Must utilize academic voice. See the Academic Voice . Must include an introduction and conclusion paragraph. Your introduction paragraph needs to end with a clear thesis statement that indicates the purpose of your paper. Must include a separate title page with the following: Title of paper Student’s name Course name and number Instructor’s name Date submitted qualitative_research_critique_template__1_.docx article_for_week_three.pdf ORDER NOW FOR CUSTOMIZED AND ORIGINAL ESSAY PAPERS Running head: QUALITATIVE RESEARCH CRITIQUE Qualitative Research Critique [Student’s Name] PSY 326 Research Design [Instructor’s Name] [Date submitted] 1 QUALITATIVE RESEARCH CRITIQUE 2 Qualitative Research Critique Introduction [Instructions for using this template: Replace the text in brackets on the title page with your information. Answer the questions and provide the required information indicated below, in the order these items are presented. Use complete sentences in your response and delete the question or instruction, including this paragraph, after you have finished typing your answers. Throughout the paper, cite the source of the information. List the references for all sources that are cited, as indicated in the note on the References page.] What is your purpose for writing this paper? What is the title of the study you are critiquing, and who are the authors? Summarize the research question(s) in your own words as much as possible. If your instructor allows quotes and you find it necessary to quote from the article, use quotation marks around the quoted passage and cite the quote in APA format with author’s last name, year of publication, and page number where the quoted material appeared. Briefly summarize background information on the topic from the study’s literature review. Comment on whether or not there is any apparent bias in the selection of studies in the literature review. Summary of Methods Which qualitative research design was used? Name the sampling method and describe how the participants were selected. QUALITATIVE RESEARCH CRITIQUE 3 How did the researchers collect data from the participants? Did the researchers mention bracketing, epoché, or reflexivity? What coding and analysis procedures were used to analyze the data? What efforts were made to ensure trustworthiness, credibility, and/or dependability? Summary of Findings What themes or other findings were presented in the study? Was sufficient evidence provided to support the conclusions drawn by the researchers? If so, what is the nature of the evidence? If not, what is missing? Ethical Aspects Did the researchers explicitly address ethical issues in the article? If not, was there evidence in the report that the participants’ wellbeing and confidentiality were protected? Was an approval process by an Institutional Review Board or similar ethics review committee mentioned? Were any of the practices ethically questionable? If so, what could have been done to resolve these issues? Evaluation of Study Referring to a source about the research design and methods used in this study to support your evaluation, do you feel the researchers used these methods appropriately to investigate the research question? What do you see as the strengths of how this study was done? QUALITATIVE RESEARCH CRITIQUE 4 What limitations or weaknesses were mentioned by the authors? What limitations do you see (if any) that they did not mention? What suggestions did the authors make for future research on the topic? Do you think another approach might be better for the research question than the research design and methods that were used in this study? If so, what other methods would you consider? Conclusion Briefly review the main points of your summary and evaluation of the study. What would you recommend for a research question and methods for a follow-up study on this topic? QUALITATIVE RESEARCH CRITIQUE 5 References [Note: List references here in alphabetical order by the first author’s last name, in APA format with a hanging indent. Include all sources cited in the body of the paper. Do not list any that are not cited in the paper. PSY326 Ashford How Do Modern Parents Deal with Cultural Beliefs At a minimum, you should use the article being critiqued, one article about the research design from the Research Methods research guide in the Ashford Library, and the course textbook. An example citation featuring the textbook follows this note.] Newman, M. (2016). Research methods in psychology. (2nd ed.). San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education. Research How do modern parents deal with cultural beliefs about breastfeeding? A qualitative study © 2018 MA Healthcare Ltd T he majority of infant morbidity and mortality occurs in developing countries (UNICEF, 2018). Indonesia is one of the countries with high infant morbidity and mortality rates (Indonesian Ministry of Health, 2015). The primary cause of infant death is contraction of an infectious disease, which may be prevented by providing an appropriate infant feeding regimen (UNICEF, 2018). Breastfeeding is a cheap and easy way to reduce infant morbidity and mortality rates (UNICEF, 2018). Breastfeeding is known to be the best nutrition for infants. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that every mother breastfeeds exclusively for 6 months and then to continue breastfeeding for up to 2 years (WHO, 2017); however, the exclusive breastfeeding rate in Indonesia is only 45% (Indonesian Ministry of Health, 2015). Previous studies have highlighted the effects of cultural beliefs on breastfeeding practice (Osman et al, 2009; Sharma et al, 2016), and have shown that exclusive breastfeeding practices among Indonesian mothers are affected by cultural beliefs related to breastfeeding (Rejeki, 2010). Cultural beliefs related to breastfeeding have been identified as a possible explanation for the differences in breastfeeding practices (Gibson et al, 2005). Different ethnic groups may have different beliefs, attitudes, and practices regarding nutrition and breastfeeding, even though they may live in the same region. The majority of Indonesians are of Javanese ethnicity (40.2%) and most live in Central Java Province, which is the third most populous province in Indonesia (Nuraini et al, 2016). Javanese cultural beliefs strongly influence breastfeeding practices among Javanese mothers (Choiriyah et al, 2015); however, there is little data on the cultural beliefs about breastfeeding among young and modern mothers in Java. Identifying sensitive cultural beliefs directly helps health professionals to collect data regarding cultural beliefs that may affect community behaviour (Abramson, 1992). In Java there are many myths, taboos, rituals and customs related to the breastfeeding period (Choiriyah et al, 2015). Some cultural beliefs are safe and provide British Journal of Midwifery, September 2018, Vol 26, No 9 Abstract Background Cultural beliefs strongly affect the practice of breastfeeding. Interpretations of cultural beliefs change over time, particularly among modern parents; however, knowledge of these changes is limited. Aim To explore cultural beliefs related to breastfeeding and modern Indonesian parents’ perceptions. Methods This article reports on the cultural beliefs about breastfeeding from an ethnographic study of 23 participants. Data were collected using focus group discussions, in-depth interviews and observations, and analysed using thematic analysis. Findings Analysis revealed four main themes: ‘suggested food and behaviour’; ‘restricted food and behaviour’; ‘consequences of avoiding taboos’ and ‘the dynamic change in cultural beliefs’. Conclusions Healthcare providers can use the results of this study to develop a culturally sensitive educational programmes that are congruent with modern parents’ needs. PSY326 Ashford How Do Modern Parents Deal with Cultural Beliefs Keywords Cultural beliefs | Breastfeeding | Indonesia Mekar Dwi Anggraeni Lecturer, Nursing Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, Jenderal Soedirman University, Indonesia Budi Aji Lecturer, Public Health Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, Jenderal Soedirman University, Indonesia Rahmi Setiyani Lecturer, Nursing Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, Jenderal Soedirman University, Indonesia Aprilia Kartikasari Lecturer, Nursing Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, Jenderal Soedirman University, Indonesia Eni Rahmawati Lecturer, Nursing Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, Jenderal Soedirman University, Indonesia [email protected] 605 Research benefits for mothers and infants, but others are harmful (Ergenekon-Ozelci et al, 2006). Identifying cultural beliefs about breastfeeding is therefore important in order to promote maternal and infant health. Cultural beliefs have been shown to affect health practice (Leininger, 2002). Health professionals should have the abillity to provide culturally congruent care (Garneau and Pepin, 2015). Exclusive breastfeeding promotion strategies should fit with the population and its characteristics (WHO, 2018). Therefore, having an understanding of cultural beliefs is important for healthcare providers in providing culturally sensitive care, better support and appropriate counselling to breastfeeding mothers (Osman et al, 2009). Little is known about the cultural beliefs around breastfeeding in the modern Javanese community, so a qualitative study was conducted to explore the cultural beliefs about breastfeeding.The results of this study are expected to lead to the development of a culturally sensitive educational programme for the young Javanese mothers in Indonesia. Women in the key participant group were primiparous and multiparous, had undergone vaginal and caesarian births, and had delivered both term and preterm babies. All participants were Javanese-born, residing in Central Java Province, able to communicate verbally and willing to participate. They all signed an informed consent form. General participants in this study included family members, midwives and traditional birth attendants. According to Morse (1994), a qualitative study requires about 30-50 participants including key and general participants; however, if the study has reached saturation, the number of participants can be fewer (Morse, 2000). The number of participants in this study was 23 because saturation was reached with the 23rd participant. Purpose The purpose of this study was to explore cultural beliefs on breastfeeding and modern parents’ perceptions of these cultural beliefs in Central Java Province, Indonesia. This study will help healthcare providers to improve their knowledge and provide culturally sensitive care in Central Java Province, Indonesia. Ethical considerations This study received ethical approval from an institutional review board, and the researcher received permission to conduct this study from the Government Office. All participants were asked to sign the informed consent form after being provided with information about the study, its purpose, benefits, potential risks, anonymity, confidentiality, the rights of study participants and the researchers’ contact details. PSY326 Ashford How Do Modern Parents Deal with Cultural Beliefs The researchers approached the study with empathy, allowing the interviews to be interrupted when babies became fussy or needed feeding, or when mothers needed to cook for another child. Study design This study was conducted using an ethnographic approach. Ethnography is a research method that provides a chance to understand the social constructs of customs, behaviour, language and interactions (Creswell, 2012). Cultural beliefs on breastfeeding were explored from the perspective of young Javanese mothers, their family members, health professionals and traditional birth attendants (TBAs).These cultural beliefs included beliefs on food, behaviour, myths, taboos and customs. All of the researchers were Javanese, lived in Central Java Province, and spoke the same language as the participants, which may have helped the researchers to understand, describe and interpret the meanings, situations and events. Study participants The researchers used both purposive and snowball sampling methods to select both key and general participants. Researchers contacted community health volunteers, who then recommended women for inclusion in the study.The researchers met potential participants at their homes, provided information about the study and asked women if they woud be interested in participating. 606 Data collection Data were collected from March to September 2017. The researchers used multiple data collection methods until data saturation was reached. This included focus group discussions, in-depth interviews, observations and document-related sources. Data were collected and analysed using thematic analysis (Braun and Clarke, 2012). The natural setting is important in an ethnographic study (Creswell, 2013), and so after receiving study approval and permission, the researchers approached the proposed participants to build rapport, provide study-related information and ask for their willingness to participate in this study. All participants then signed the informed consent form to show that they understood and wanted to participate in this study. The focus group discussions and interview guides were based on previous knowledge related to the phenomena. They were peer-reviewed and pilot-tested before being used to collect the data. The focus group discussion British Journal of Midwifery, September 2018, Vol 26, No 9 © 2018 MA Healthcare Ltd Method Study setting This study was conducted in a community setting on Java Island, which is the most populous island in Indonesia. Central Java Province is the third most populous province in Indonesia, and Javanese is the largest ethnic group (40.2%) in the country (Nuraini et al, 2016). Research Adobe Stock/Aqnus © 2018 MA Healthcare Ltd This study sought to examine what influenced modern Indonesian mothers to breastfeed guide included mothers’ perceptions of breastfeeding and exclusive breastfeeding, cultural beliefs related to breastfeeding, suggestions given during breastfeeding, and myths, taboos and customs. The interview guide for the grandmothers, TBAs and healthcare providers focused on the cultural beliefs related to breastfeeding and their experiences on caring for breastfeeding mothers. The researchers conducted two focus group discussions involving 18 breastfeeding mothers. This method was chosen since it allows for spontaneous and informal discussions of the participants’ everyday lives and allows for participants to add further information to others’ statements. The participants were selected by the diversity of their individual characteristics, and included both primiparous and multiparous women, vaginal and caesarean births, working and stay-at-home mothers, nuclear and extended family, and women living in both urban and rural areas.The researchers approached 11 mothers to be interviewed in-depth and observed in their homes, since they were more knowledgeable, had richer experiences or particular issues that could not be expressed in front of the other participants. In addition, grandmothers, TBAs and healthcare providers were interviewed and observed in order to explore their cultural beliefs on breastfeeding and their experiences caring for breastfeeding mothers. Each participant was interviewed three to four times. PSY326 Ashford How Do Modern Parents Deal with Cultural Beliefs British Journal of Midwifery, September 2018, Vol 26, No 9 The researchers collected data from the participants until no new information emerged, and no new category was raised when the researchers added more participants to the study. According to Creswell (2013), sufficient data in a qualitative study is acquired when saturation is reached. In this study, saturation was reached with the 23rd participant. The researchers started the focus group discussions and interviews, moving from general questions to more specific questions regarding cultural beliefs on breastfeeding. The researchers conducted focus group discussions and interviews based on the participants’ available time. The researchers also observed and took note of the participants’ activities and home situations while taking in-depth interviews. All focus group discussions and interviews were recorded with the participants’ permission.They were transcribed verbatim for data analysis and will be erased after publication. Data analysis The researchers analysed the data gained from the focus group discussions and in-depth interviews. After the data were transcribed verbatim, the researchers analysed them using qualitative thematic analysis (Braun and Clarke, 2012). According to Braun and Clark (2012), qualitative thematic analysis includes reading the data repeatedly, giving initial codes, finding the themes, reviewing 607 Research Table 1. Demographic characteristics of participants (n=23) Code Age (years) Parity Educational level Employment Marital Status Role R1 30 Multiparous Bachelor’s degree Housewife Married Key informant R2 22 Primiparous High school Housewife Married Key informant R3 31 Multiparous High school Housewife Married Key informant R4 23 Primiparous Middle school Housewife Married Key informant R5 29 Multiparous High school Housewife Married Key informant R6 33 Multiparous Middle school Housewife Married Key informant R7 21 Primiparous High school Housewife Married Key informant R8 62 Multiparous Elementary Housewife Married General informant R9 31 Multiparous Bachelor’s degree Housewife Married Key informant R10 28 Multiparous High school Privately employed Married Key informant R11 54 Multiparous Middle school Housewife Married General informant R12 32 Multiparous Middle school Housewife Married Key informant R13 21 Primiparous High school Housewife Married Key informant R14 22 Primiparous High school Housewife Married Key informant R15 34 Multiparous Middle school Housewife Married Key informant R16 30 Multiparous High school Housewife Married Key informant R17 28 Multiparous High school Housewife Married Key informant R18 32 Multiparous Middle school Housewife Married Key informant R19 22 Primiparous High school Housewife Married Key informant R20 37 Multiparous Diploma Midwife Married General informant R21 64 Multiparous Elementary TBA Widowed General informant R22 30 Multiparous Diploma Privately employed Married Key informant R23 59 Multiparous Elementary Housewife Widowed General informant themes, defining and naming themes and writing the report. Becoming familiar with the data provides an opportunity for the researchers to gain knowledge regarding cultural beliefs on breastfeeding among young Javanese women. The researchers then grouped the data based on the research questions. The codes guided the researchers to develop themes and sub-themes connected with the research questions. Trustworthiness In a qualitative study there are four elements to trustworthiness: credibility, transferability, dependability and confirmability (Lincoln and Guba, 2007). To ensure credibility, the researchers should spend prolonged periods of time in the research field. All of the researchers in this study are Javanese and have been in Central Java Province 608 for a long time. Research methods included participant observation, peer debriefing, member checking and triangulation. Triangulation methods were used in this study and data were collected through focus group discussions, in-depth interviews and observations (Carter et al, 2014).The researchers also used triangulation sources to collect data involving breastfeeding mothers, family members, traditional birth attendants and healthcare providers. To ensure transferability, the researchers provided a detailed description about the participant’s characteristics and the research method. To ensure dependability, the researchers allowed the participants to read the verbatim text, preliminary themes, and final themes. The research team also discussed the verbatim text, codes, preliminary themes and final themes to find a similar conclusion, which ensured confirmability. The British Journal of Midwifery, September 2018, Vol 26, No 9 © 2018 MA Healthcare Ltd TBA: traditional birth attendant Research researchers also checked, discussed and analysed the data with local experts in breastfeeding who were all … Purchase answer to see full attachment Student has agreed that all tutoring, explanations, and answers provided by the tutor will be used to help in the learning process and in accordance with Studypool’s honor code & terms of service . Get a 10 % discount on an order above $ 100 Use the following coupon code : NURSING10

Read more
Enjoy affordable prices and lifetime discounts
Use a coupon FIRST15 and enjoy expert help with any task at the most affordable price.
Order Now Order in Chat

Start off on the right foot this semester. Get expert-written solutions at a 20% discount