Assignment: acknowledge and identify grants and other means of financial support

Assignment: acknowledge and identify grants and other means of financial support Assignment: acknowledge and identify grants and other means of financial support Assignment: acknowledge and identify grants and other means of financial support Details: The literature review is the second chapter of your dissertation. It is a place where you synthesize the information you have been reading and demonstrate how it all connects to your dissertation topic. This assignment will allow you to begin developing, if you have not already started, your literature review around your chosen dissertation topic. Assignment: acknowledge and identify grants and other means of financial support General Requirements: Use the following information to ensure successful completion of the assignment: Refer to the most current dissertation prospectus template in the DC (dc.gcu.edu) for details and criteria for literature review (Chapter 2). Instructors will be using a grading rubric to grade the assignments. It is recommended that learners review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment in order to become familiar with the assignment criteria and expectations for successful completion of the assignment. Doctoral learners are required to use APA style for their writing assignments. The APA Style Guide is located in the Student Success Center. Directions: Draft the Introduction to your literature review (Chapter 2). The Introduction should include, among other items, An opening sentence that describes the topic to be investigated A description of the importance of the topic to the field Asummary of the themes to be addressed in the chapter (the literature review). Revise any draft pieces from the 10 Strategic Points related to the Literature Review (Chapter 2) that you created in previous courses incorporating the feedback from your instructor. Complete criteria for the literature review draft are available in the most current prospectus template located in the DC. Draft the Summary to your literature review (Chapter 2). Among other ideas, the Summary should note Conflicting information (tensions)in the existing literature Omitted information (gaps) in the existing literature How the study you are doing is new and different How your study will add scholarly value to the field of study. Please follow instructions of assignment based on what is listed above. Please also cite any references in APA 6th edition format. I have attached the dissertation template for reference. This assignment only focuses on Chapter 2. I have also included my 10 research strategic points. Please let me know if further info is needed. dissertation_template_v_8_01.03.18.docx original_research_10_str The Dissertation Title Appears in Title Case and is CenteredSubmitted byInsert Your Full Legal Name (No Titles, Degrees, or Academic Credentials) Equal Spacing~2.0” – 2.5” A Dissertation Presented in Partial Fulfillmentof the Requirements for the DegreeDoctorate of Education(or) Doctorate of Philosophy(or) Doctorate of Business Administration Equal Spacing~2.0” – 2.5” Grand Canyon UniversityPhoenix, Arizona[Insert Current Date Until Date of Dean’s Signature] © by Your Full Legal Name (No Titles, Degrees, or Academic Credentials), 2017All rights reserved.GRAND CANYON UNIVERSITY The Dissertation Title Appears in Title Case and is Centered byInsert Your Full Legal Name (No Titles, Degrees, or Academic Credentials) Approved [Insert Current Date Until Date of Dean’s Signature] DISSERTATION COMMITTEE:Full Legal Name, Ed.D., DBA, or Ph.D., Dissertation ChairFull Legal Name, Ed.D., DBA, or Ph.D., Committee MemberFull Legal Name, Ed.D., DBA, or Ph.D., Committee Member ACCEPTED AND SIGNED: ________________________________________Michael R. Berger, Ed.D.Dean, College of Doctoral Studies_________________________________________Date GRAND CANYON UNIVERSITY The Dissertation Title Appears in Title Case and is Centered I verify that my dissertation represents original research, is not falsified or plagiarized, and that I accurately reported, cited, and referenced all sources within this manuscript in strict compliance with APA and Grand Canyon University (GCU) guidelines. I also verify my dissertation complies with the approval(s) granted for this research investigation by GCU Institutional Review Board (IRB). _____________________________________________ ______________________[Type Doctoral Learner Name Beneath Signature] Date AbstractThe abstract is required for the dissertation manuscript only. It is not a required page for the proposal. The abstract, typically read first by other researchers, is intended as an accurate, nonevaluative, concise summary, or synopsis of the research study. It is usually the last item completed when writing the dissertation. The purpose of the abstract is to assist future researchers in accessing the research material and other vital information contained in the dissertation. Although few people typically read the full dissertation after publication, the abstract will be read by many scholars and researchers. Consequently, great care must be taken in writing this page of the dissertation. The content of the abstract covers the purpose of the study, problem statement, theoretical foundation, research questions stated in narrative format, sample, location, methodology, design, data sources, data analysis, results, and a valid conclusion of the research. The most important finding(s) should be stated with actual data/numbers (quantitative) or themes (qualitative) to support the conclusion(s). The abstract does not appear in the table of contents and has no page number. The abstract is double-spaced, fully justified with no indentations or citations, and no longer than one page. Refer to the APA Publication Manual , 6th Edition, for additional guidelines for the development of the dissertation abstract. Make sure to add the keywords at the bottom of the abstract to assist future researchers. Keywords : Abstract, assist future researchers, 150 to 250 words, vital information Criterion *(Score = 0, 1, 2, or 3) Learner Score Chair Score Methodologist Score Content Expert Score ABSTRACT (Dissertation Only—Not Required for the Proposal) The abstract is typically read first by other researchers and is an accurate, non-evaluative, concise summary or synopsis of the research study. The abstract provides a succinct summary of the study and MUST include the purpose of the study, theoretical foundation, research questions (stated in narrative format), sample, location, methodology, design, data analysis, and results, as well as, a valid conclusion of the research. Abstracts must be double-spaced, fully justified with no indentions. (one page) The abstract provides a succinct summary of the study and MUST include: the purpose of the study, theoretical foundation, research questions stated in narrative format, sample, location, methodology, design, data sources, data analysis, results, and a valid conclusion of the research. Note: The most important finding(s) should be stated with actual data/numbers (quantitative) ~or~ themes (qualitative) to support the conclusion(s). The abstract is written in APA format, one paragraph fully justified with no indentations, double-spaced with no citations, and includes key search words. Keywords are on a new line and indented. The abstract is written in a way that is well structured, has a logical flow, uses correct paragraph structure, uses correct sentence structure, uses correct punctuation, and uses correct APA format. Assignment: acknowledge and identify grants and other means of financial support Assignment: acknowledge and identify grants and other means of financial support *Score each requirement listed in the criteria table using the following scale: 0 = Item Not Present or Unacceptable. Substantial Revisions are Required.1 = Item is Present. Does Not Meet Expectations. Revisions are Required.2 = Item is Acceptable. Meets Expectations. Some Revisions May be Suggested or Required.3 = Item Exceeds Expectations. No Revisions are Required. Reviewer Comments: DedicationAn optional dedication may be included here. While a dissertation is an objective, scientific document, this is the place to use the first person and to be subjective. The dedication page is numbered with a Roman numeral, but the page number does not appear in the Table of Contents. It is only included in the final dissertation and is not part of the proposal. If this page is not to be included, delete the heading, the body text, and the page break below. AcknowledgmentsAn optional acknowledgements page can be included here. This is another place to use the first person. If applicable, acknowledge and identify grants and other means of financial support. Also acknowledge supportive colleagues who rendered assistance. The acknowledgments page is numbered with a Roman numeral, but the page number does not appear in the table of contents. This page provides a formal opportunity to thank family, friends, and faculty members who have been helpful and supportive. The acknowledgements page is only included in the final dissertation and is not part of the proposal. If this page is not to be included, delete the heading, the body text, and the page break below. Table of Contents List of Tables. xi List of Figures. xii Chapter 1: Introduction to the Study. 1 Introduction. 1 Background of the Study. 6 Problem Statement 7 Purpose of the Study. 10 Research Questions and/or Hypotheses. 11 Advancing Scientific Knowledge and Significance of the Study. 14 Rationale for Methodology. 15 Nature of the Research Design for the Study. 17 Definition of Terms. 19 Assumptions, Limitations, Delimitations. 21 Assumptions. 21 Limitations and delimitations. 22 Summary and Organization of the Remainder of the Study. 23 Chapter 2: Literature Review.. 26 Introduction to the Chapter and Background to the Problem.. 26 Identification of the Gap. 28 Theoretical Foundations and/or Conceptual Framework. 30 Review of the Literature. 32 Methodology and instrumentation/data sources/research materials. 36 Summary. 39 Chapter 3: Methodology. 42 Introduction. 42 Statement of the Problem.. 43 Research Questions and/or Hypotheses. 44 Research Methodology. 45 Research Design. 47 Population and Sample Selection. 48 Quantitative sample size. 49 Qualitative sample size. 50 Research Materials, Instrumentation OR Sources of Data. 54 Trustworthiness (for Qualitative Studies) 58 Credibility. 59 Transferability. 60 Dependability. 60 Confirmability. 61 Validity (for Quantitative Studies) 61 Reliability (for Quantitative Studies) 63 Data Collection and Management 64 Data Analysis Procedures. 66 Ethical Considerations. 69 Limitations and Delimitations. 72 Summary. 73 Chapter 4: Data Analysis and Results. 75 Introduction. 75 Descriptive Findings. 76 Data Analysis Procedures. 80 Results. 82 Summary. 90 Chapter 5: Summary, Conclusions, and Recommendations. 93 Introduction and Summary of Study. 93 Summary of Findings and Conclusion. 94 Implications. 97 Theoretical implications. 97 Practical implications. 98 Future implications. 98 Strengths and weaknesses of the study. 98 Recommendations. 99 Recommendations for future research. 99 Recommendations for future practice. 100 References. . 103 Appendix A. Site Authorization Letter(s) 108 Appendix B. IRB Approval Letter 109 Appendix C. Informed Consent 110 Appendix D. Copy of Instruments and Permissions Letters to Use the Instruments. 111 Appendix E. Power Analyses for Sample Size Calculation (Quantitative Only) 112 Appendix F. Additional Appendices. 113 List of TablesTable 1. Correct Formatting for a Multiple Line Table Title is Single Spacing and Should Look Like this Example……………………………………………………………… 78Table 2. Equality of Emotional Intelligence Mean Scores by Gender……………………….. 84Table 3. The Servant Leader……………………………………………………………………………….. 86 Note: Single space multiple-line table titles; double space between entries per example above. The List of Tables and List of Figures (styled as Table of Figures) have been formatted as such in this template. Update the List of Tables in the following manner: [Right click à Update Field à Update Entire Table], and the table title and subtitle will show up with the in-text formatting. After you update your List of Tables, you will need to manually remove the italics from each of your table titles per the example above. List of FiguresFigure 1. IRB alert………………………………………………………………………………………………. 70Figure 2. Correlation for SAT composite score and time spent on Facebook……………… 87 Note: single-space multiple line figure titles; double-space between entries per example in List of Tables on previous page. Use sentence case for figure titles. After you update your List of Figures, you will need to manually remove the italics per the example above. Chapter 1: Introduction to the Study IntroductionThis section describes what the researcher will investigate, including the research questions, hypotheses, and basic research design. The introduction develops the significance of the study by describing how the study is new or different from other studies, how it addresses something that is not already known or has not been studied before, or how it extends prior research on the topic in some way. This section should also briefly describe the basic nature of the study and provide an overview of the contents of Chapter 1.The GCU Dissertation Template provides the structure for the GCU dissertation. The template provides important narrative, instructions, and requirements in each chapter and section. Learners must read the narrative in each section to fully understand what is required and also review the section criteria table which provides exact details on how the section will be scored. As the learner writes each section, s/he should delete the narrative and “Help” comments, but leave the criterion table, after each section, as this is how the committee members will evaluate the learners work. Additionally, when inserting their own narrative into the template, leaners should never remove the headings , as these are already formatted, or “styled.” Removing the headings will cause the text to have to be reformatted, that is, you will need to reapply the style. “Styles” are a feature in Word that defines what the text looks like on the page. For example, the style “Heading 1, used for Chapter headings and the List of Tables title, the List of Figures title, the References title, and the Appendices title, has set up to conform to APA: bold, double spaced, “keep with next,” Times New Roman 12. In addition, the automatic TOC “reads” these styles so that the headings show up in the TOC and exactly match those in the text.The navigation pane in Word shows the first and second level headings that will appear in the Table of Contents. To access the navigation pane, click on Home in a Word document>View Pane. Learners should consult their course e-books for additional guidance on constructing the various sections of the template (e.g., Grand Canyon University, 2015, 2016, 2017a, 2017b).Learners should keep in mind that they will write Chapters 1 through 3 as the dissertation proposal. However, there are changes that typically need to be made in these chapters to enrich the content or to improve the readability as the final dissertation manuscript is written. Often, after data analysis is complete, the first three chapters will need revisions to reflect a more in-depth understanding of the topic and to ensure consistency. Engaging in scholarly writing, understanding the criterion rubrics, and focusing on continuous improvement will help facilitate timely progression.To ensure the quality of both the proposal and final dissertation and reduce the time for AQR reviews, writing needs to reflect doctoral level, scholarly-writing standards from the very first draft . Each section within the proposal or dissertation should be well organized and easy for the reader to follow. Each paragraph should be short, clear, and focused. A paragraph should (1) be three to eight sentences in length, (2) focus on one point, topic, or argument, (3) include a topic sentence the defines the focus for the paragraph, and (4) include a transition sentence to the next paragraph. Include one space after each period. There should be no grammatical, punctuation, sentence structure, or APA formatting errors. Verb tense is an important consideration for Chapters 1 through 3. For the proposal, the researcher uses future tense (e.g., “The purpose of this proposed study is to…”), whereas in the dissertation, the chapters are revised to reflect past tense (e.g., “The purpose of this study was to…”). Taking the time to ensure high-quality, scholarly writing for each draft will save learners time in all the steps of the development and review phases of the dissertation process.As a doctoral researcher, it is the learner’s responsibility to ensure the clarity, quality, and correctness of their writing and APA formatting. The DC Network provides various resources to help learners improve their writing. Grand Canyon University also offers writing tutoring services through the Center for Learning Advancement on writing basics; however, the writing tutors do not provide any level of dissertation editing. The chair and committee members are not obligated to edit documents. Additionally, the AQR reviewers will not edit the proposal or dissertation. If learners do not have outstanding writing skills, they may need to identify a writing coach, editor, and/or other resource to help with writing and editing. Poorly-written proposals and dissertations will be immediately suspended in the various levels of review if submitted with grammatical, structural, and/or form-and-formatting errors.The quality of a dissertation is evaluated on the quality of writing and based on the criteria that GCU has established for each section of the dissertation. The criteria describe what must be addressed in each section within each chapter. As learners develop a section, first read the section description. Then, review each criterion contained in the table below the description. Learners use both the overall description and criteria as they write each section. Address each listed criterion in a way that it is clear to the chair and committee members. Learners should be able to point out where each criterion is met in each section.Prior to submitting a draft of the proposal or dissertation or a single chapter to the chair or committee members, learners should assess the degree to which each criterion has been met. Use the criteria table at the end of each section to complete this self-assessment. The following scores reflect the readiness of the document: 0 = Item Not Present or Unacceptable. Substantial Revisions Are Required. 1 = Item is Present. Does Not Meet Expectations. Revisions are Required. 2 = Item is Acceptable. Meets Expectations. 3 = Item is Exemplary. No Revisions Required. Sometimes the chair and committee members will score the work “between” numbers, such as a 1.5 or 2.5. The important thing to remember is that a minimum score of 2 is required on each criterion on the prospectus, proposal and dissertation before one can move to the next step. A good guideline to remember is that learners are not finished with the dissertation until the dean signs the cover page. Learners need to continuously and objectively self-evaluate the quality of writing and content for each section within the proposal or dissertation. Learners will score their work using the learner column in the criteria tables as evidence that they have critically evaluated their own work. When learners have completed a realistic, comprehensive self-evaluation of their work, then they may submit the document to the chair for review. Rating work as all 3’s will indicate that the learner has not done this. The chair will also review and score each section of the proposal and dissertation and will determine when it is ready for full committee review. Keep in mind the committee review process will likely require several editorial/revisions rounds, so plan for multiple revision cycles as learners develop their dissertation completion plan and project timeline. Notice the tables that certain columns have an X in the scoring box. As mentioned above, the chair will score all five chapters, the abstract and the reference list; the methodologist is only required to score Chapters 1, 3, and 4 and the abstract; the content expert is only required to score Chapters 1, 2, and 5 and the abstract. The chair and committee members will assess each criterion in their required chapters when they return the document with feedback.Once the document has been fully scored and approved by the chair and committee, and is approved for Level 2 or 5 review, the chair will submit one copy of the proposal or dissertation document with the fully scored assessment tables and one copy of the document with the assessment tables removed for AQR review. Refer to the Dissertation Milestone Guide for descriptions of levels of review and submission process. Criterion *(Score = 0, 1, 2, or 3) Learner Score Chair Score Methodologist Score Content Expert Score Introduction This section provides a brief overview of the research focus or problem, explains why this study is worth conducting, and discusses how this study will be completed. (Minimum three to four paragraphs or approximately one page) Dissertation topic is introduced and value of conducting the study is discussed. Discussion provides an overview of what is contained in the chapter. Section is written in a way that is well structured, has a logical flow, uses correct paragraph structure, uses correct sentence structure, uses correct punctuation, and uses correct APA format. *Score each requirement listed in the criteria table using the following scale: 0 = Item Not Present or Unacceptable. Substantial Revisions are Required.1 = Item is Present. Does Not Meet Expectations. Revisions are Required.2 = Item is Acceptable. Meets Expectations. Some Revisions May be Suggested or Required.3 = Item Exceeds Expectations. No Revisions are Required. Reviewer Comments: Background of the StudyThe background section of Chapter 1 describes the recent history of the problem under study. It provides a summary of results from the prior empirical research on the topic. First, the learner identifies the need for the study, referred to as a gap, which the dissertation study will address. Strategies learners can use to identify a need or gap include: Using results from prior studies. Using recommendations for further study. Using societal problems documented in the literature. Using broad areas of research in current empirical articles. Using needs identified in three to five research studies (primarily from the last three years. Next, the learner builds an argument or justification for the current study by presenting a series of logical arguments, each supported with citations from the literature. This need, called a gap, developed from the literature, is the basis for creating the problem statement. A local need is appropriate for a study. However, the learner needs to situate the “need” or problem by discussing how it is applicable beyond the local setting and contributes to societal and/or professional needs. The problem statement is developed based on the need or gap defined in the Background to the Study section. Criterion *(Score = 0, 1, 2, or 3) Learner Score Chair Score Methodologist Score Content Expert Score Background of the Study Minimum two to three paragraphs or approximately one page The background section of Chapter 1 provides a brief history of the problem.Provides a summary of results from the prior empirical research on the topic. Using results, societal needs, recommendations for further study, or needs identified in three to five research studies (primarily from the last three years), the learner identifies the stated need, called a gap.Builds a justification for the current study, using a logical set of arguments supported by citations. The problem is discussed as applicable beyond the local setting and contributes to societal and/or professional needs. Section is written in a way that is well structured, has a logical flow, uses correct paragraph structure, uses correct sentence structure, uses correct punctuation, and uses correct APA format. *Score each requirement listed in the criteria table using the following scale: 0 = Item Not Present or Unacceptable. Substantial Revisions are Required.1 = Item is Present. Does Not Meet Expectations. Revisions are Required.2 = Item is Acceptable. Meets Expectations. Some Revisions May be Suggested or Required.3 = Item Exceeds Expectations. No Revisions are Required. Reviewer Comments: Problem StatementResearch problems are socially constructed, meaning that a problem may not be considered one until society recognizes it as a problem. For example, spousal abuse was recognized as a problem after women earned more rights. Research problems are not determined only by how much one knows about it, but by the need to investigate phenomena that affect people in order to improve their lives (Krysik & Flynn, 2013).The Problem Statement section begins with a declarative statement of the problem under study, such as “It is not known if and to what degree/extent…” or “It is not known how/why…” Other examples are: It is not known _____. Absent from the literature is______. While the literature indicates ____________, it is not known in (school/district/organization/community) if __________. This section then describes general population affected by the problem along with the importance, scope or opportunity for the problem and the importance of addressing the problem. Questions to consider when writing the problem include: What is the need in the world or gap in the literature that this problem statement addresses? What is the real issue that is affecting society, students, organizations? At what frequency is the problem occurring? What is the extent of human suffering that the problem produces? Why has the problem received lack of attention in the past? What does the literature and research say about the problem that can and should be addressed at this time? What are the negative outcomes that this issue is addressing? This section ends with a description of the unit of analysis, which is the phenomenon, individuals, group or organization under study. Specifically, at the conceptual level, the unit of analysis is the entity/thing (social organization, community, group, individual, social artifacts, policies/principles, or phenomenon) that the researcher wants to be able to say something about. It is the main focus of the study. The unit of analysis is that which the researcher is studying. At the implementation level, the unit of analysis gets determined and defined by the research question/problem statement. Criterion * (Score = 0, 1, 2, or 3) Learner Score Chair Score Methodologist Score Content Expert Score States the specific problem proposed for research with a clear declarative statement.Discusses the problem statement in relation to the gap or need in the world, considering such issues as: real issues affecting society, students, or organizations; the frequency that the problem occurs; the extent of human suffering the problem produces, the perceived lack of attention in the past; the discussion of the problem in the literature and research about what should be addressed vis à vis the problem; the negative outcomes the issue addresses. Describes the general population affected by the problem. The general population refers to all individuals that could be affected by the study problem.Example: All older adults in the US who are 65 yrs. or older. The target population is a more specific sub-population of interest from the general population, such as low income older adults (? 65 yrs.) in AZ. Thus, the sample is derived from the target population, not from the general one. Describes the unit of analysis, which is the phenomenon, individuals, group or organization under study. Discusses the importance, scope, or opportunity for the problem and the importance of addressing the problem. Section is written in a way that is well structured, has a logical flow, uses correct paragraph structure, uses correct sentence structure, uses correct punctuation, and uses correct APA format. *Score each requirement listed in the criteria table using the following scale: 0 = Item Not Present or Unacceptable. Substantial Revisions are Required.1 = Item is Present. Does Not Meet Expectations. Revisions are Required.2 = Item is Acceptable. Meets Expectations. Some Revisions May be Suggested or Required.3 = Item Exceeds Expectations. No Revisions are Required. Reviewer Comments: Purpose of the StudyThe Purpose of the Study section of Chapter 1 provides a reflection of the problem statement and identifies how the study will be accomplished. It explains how the proposed study will contribute to the field. The section begins with a declarative statement, “The purpose of this study is….” Included in this statement are also the research design, target population, variables (quantitative) or phenomena (qualitative) to be studied, and the geographic location. Further, the section clearly defines the variables, relationship of variables, or comparison of groups for quantitative studies. For qualitative studies, this section describes the nature of the phenomenon/a to be explored. Keep in mind that the purpose of the study is restated in other chapters of the dissertation and should be worded exactly as presented in this section of Chapter 1. Criterion *(Score = 0, 1, 2, or 3) Learner Score Chair Score Methodologist Score Content Expert Score PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Minimum two to three paragraphs Begins with one sentence that identifies the research methodology and design, target population, variables (quantitative) or phenomena (qualitative) to be studied and geographic location.This can be presented as a declarative statement: “The purpose of this study is….” that identifies the research methodology and design, population, variables (quantitative) or phenomena (qualitative) to be studied and geographic location. Describes the target population and geographic location. Quantitative Studies : Defines the variables and relationship of variables. Qualitative Studies : Describes the nature of the phenomena to be explored. Section is written in a way that is well structured, has a logical flow, uses correct paragraph structure, uses correct sentence structure, uses correct punctuation, and uses correct APA format. *Score each requirement listed in the criteria table using the following scale: 0 = Item Not Present or Unacceptable. Substantial Revisions are Required.1 = Item is Present. Does Not Meet Expectations. Revisions are Required.2 = Item is Acceptable. Meets Expectations. Some Revisions May be Suggested or Required.3 = Item Exceeds Expectations. No Revisions are Required. Reviewer Comments: Research Questions and/or HypothesesThis section narrows the focus of the study and specifies the research questions to address the problem statement. Based on the research questions, it describes the variables or groups and their hypothesized relationship for a quantitative study or the phenomena under investigation for a qualitative study. The research questions and hypotheses should be derived from, and are directly aligned with, the problem statement and theoretical foundation (theory(s) or model(s). The Research Questions and/or Hypotheses section of Chapter 1 will be presented again in Chapter 3 to provide clear continuity for the reader and to help frame data analysis in Chapter 4.If the study is qualitative, state the research questions the study will answer, and describe the phenomenon to be studied. Qualitative studies will typically have one overarching research question with three or more subquestions. If the study is quantitative or mixed methods, state the research questions the study will answer, identify the variables, and state the hypotheses (predictive statements) using the format appropriate for the specific design. For quantitative studies, the research questions align with the purpose statem

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Assignment: acknowledge and identify grants and other means of financial support

Assignment: acknowledge and identify grants and other means of financial support Assignment: acknowledge and identify grants and other means of financial support Assignment: acknowledge and identify grants and other means of financial support Details: The literature review is the second chapter of your dissertation. It is a place where you synthesize the information you have been reading and demonstrate how it all connects to your dissertation topic. This assignment will allow you to begin developing, if you have not already started, your literature review around your chosen dissertation topic. Assignment: acknowledge and identify grants and other means of financial support General Requirements: Use the following information to ensure successful completion of the assignment: Refer to the most current dissertation prospectus template in the DC (dc.gcu.edu) for details and criteria for literature review (Chapter 2). Instructors will be using a grading rubric to grade the assignments. It is recommended that learners review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment in order to become familiar with the assignment criteria and expectations for successful completion of the assignment. Doctoral learners are required to use APA style for their writing assignments. The APA Style Guide is located in the Student Success Center. Directions: Draft the Introduction to your literature review (Chapter 2). The Introduction should include, among other items, An opening sentence that describes the topic to be investigated A description of the importance of the topic to the field Asummary of the themes to be addressed in the chapter (the literature review). Revise any draft pieces from the 10 Strategic Points related to the Literature Review (Chapter 2) that you created in previous courses incorporating the feedback from your instructor. Complete criteria for the literature review draft are available in the most current prospectus template located in the DC. Draft the Summary to your literature review (Chapter 2). Among other ideas, the Summary should note Conflicting information (tensions)in the existing literature Omitted information (gaps) in the existing literature How the study you are doing is new and different How your study will add scholarly value to the field of study. Please follow instructions of assignment based on what is listed above. Please also cite any references in APA 6th edition format. I have attached the dissertation template for reference. This assignment only focuses on Chapter 2. I have also included my 10 research strategic points. Please let me know if further info is needed. dissertation_template_v_8_01.03.18.docx original_research_10_str The Dissertation Title Appears in Title Case and is CenteredSubmitted byInsert Your Full Legal Name (No Titles, Degrees, or Academic Credentials) Equal Spacing~2.0” – 2.5” A Dissertation Presented in Partial Fulfillmentof the Requirements for the DegreeDoctorate of Education(or) Doctorate of Philosophy(or) Doctorate of Business Administration Equal Spacing~2.0” – 2.5” Grand Canyon UniversityPhoenix, Arizona[Insert Current Date Until Date of Dean’s Signature] © by Your Full Legal Name (No Titles, Degrees, or Academic Credentials), 2017All rights reserved.GRAND CANYON UNIVERSITY The Dissertation Title Appears in Title Case and is Centered byInsert Your Full Legal Name (No Titles, Degrees, or Academic Credentials) Approved [Insert Current Date Until Date of Dean’s Signature] DISSERTATION COMMITTEE:Full Legal Name, Ed.D., DBA, or Ph.D., Dissertation ChairFull Legal Name, Ed.D., DBA, or Ph.D., Committee MemberFull Legal Name, Ed.D., DBA, or Ph.D., Committee Member ACCEPTED AND SIGNED: ________________________________________Michael R. Berger, Ed.D.Dean, College of Doctoral Studies_________________________________________Date GRAND CANYON UNIVERSITY The Dissertation Title Appears in Title Case and is Centered I verify that my dissertation represents original research, is not falsified or plagiarized, and that I accurately reported, cited, and referenced all sources within this manuscript in strict compliance with APA and Grand Canyon University (GCU) guidelines. I also verify my dissertation complies with the approval(s) granted for this research investigation by GCU Institutional Review Board (IRB). _____________________________________________ ______________________[Type Doctoral Learner Name Beneath Signature] Date AbstractThe abstract is required for the dissertation manuscript only. It is not a required page for the proposal. The abstract, typically read first by other researchers, is intended as an accurate, nonevaluative, concise summary, or synopsis of the research study. It is usually the last item completed when writing the dissertation. The purpose of the abstract is to assist future researchers in accessing the research material and other vital information contained in the dissertation. Although few people typically read the full dissertation after publication, the abstract will be read by many scholars and researchers. Consequently, great care must be taken in writing this page of the dissertation. The content of the abstract covers the purpose of the study, problem statement, theoretical foundation, research questions stated in narrative format, sample, location, methodology, design, data sources, data analysis, results, and a valid conclusion of the research. The most important finding(s) should be stated with actual data/numbers (quantitative) or themes (qualitative) to support the conclusion(s). The abstract does not appear in the table of contents and has no page number. The abstract is double-spaced, fully justified with no indentations or citations, and no longer than one page. Refer to the APA Publication Manual , 6th Edition, for additional guidelines for the development of the dissertation abstract. Make sure to add the keywords at the bottom of the abstract to assist future researchers. Keywords : Abstract, assist future researchers, 150 to 250 words, vital information Criterion *(Score = 0, 1, 2, or 3) Learner Score Chair Score Methodologist Score Content Expert Score ABSTRACT (Dissertation Only—Not Required for the Proposal) The abstract is typically read first by other researchers and is an accurate, non-evaluative, concise summary or synopsis of the research study. The abstract provides a succinct summary of the study and MUST include the purpose of the study, theoretical foundation, research questions (stated in narrative format), sample, location, methodology, design, data analysis, and results, as well as, a valid conclusion of the research. Abstracts must be double-spaced, fully justified with no indentions. (one page) The abstract provides a succinct summary of the study and MUST include: the purpose of the study, theoretical foundation, research questions stated in narrative format, sample, location, methodology, design, data sources, data analysis, results, and a valid conclusion of the research. Note: The most important finding(s) should be stated with actual data/numbers (quantitative) ~or~ themes (qualitative) to support the conclusion(s). The abstract is written in APA format, one paragraph fully justified with no indentations, double-spaced with no citations, and includes key search words. Keywords are on a new line and indented. The abstract is written in a way that is well structured, has a logical flow, uses correct paragraph structure, uses correct sentence structure, uses correct punctuation, and uses correct APA format. Assignment: acknowledge and identify grants and other means of financial support Assignment: acknowledge and identify grants and other means of financial support *Score each requirement listed in the criteria table using the following scale: 0 = Item Not Present or Unacceptable. Substantial Revisions are Required.1 = Item is Present. Does Not Meet Expectations. Revisions are Required.2 = Item is Acceptable. Meets Expectations. Some Revisions May be Suggested or Required.3 = Item Exceeds Expectations. No Revisions are Required. Reviewer Comments: DedicationAn optional dedication may be included here. While a dissertation is an objective, scientific document, this is the place to use the first person and to be subjective. The dedication page is numbered with a Roman numeral, but the page number does not appear in the Table of Contents. It is only included in the final dissertation and is not part of the proposal. If this page is not to be included, delete the heading, the body text, and the page break below. AcknowledgmentsAn optional acknowledgements page can be included here. This is another place to use the first person. If applicable, acknowledge and identify grants and other means of financial support. Also acknowledge supportive colleagues who rendered assistance. The acknowledgments page is numbered with a Roman numeral, but the page number does not appear in the table of contents. This page provides a formal opportunity to thank family, friends, and faculty members who have been helpful and supportive. The acknowledgements page is only included in the final dissertation and is not part of the proposal. If this page is not to be included, delete the heading, the body text, and the page break below. Table of Contents List of Tables. xi List of Figures. xii Chapter 1: Introduction to the Study. 1 Introduction. 1 Background of the Study. 6 Problem Statement 7 Purpose of the Study. 10 Research Questions and/or Hypotheses. 11 Advancing Scientific Knowledge and Significance of the Study. 14 Rationale for Methodology. 15 Nature of the Research Design for the Study. 17 Definition of Terms. 19 Assumptions, Limitations, Delimitations. 21 Assumptions. 21 Limitations and delimitations. 22 Summary and Organization of the Remainder of the Study. 23 Chapter 2: Literature Review.. 26 Introduction to the Chapter and Background to the Problem.. 26 Identification of the Gap. 28 Theoretical Foundations and/or Conceptual Framework. 30 Review of the Literature. 32 Methodology and instrumentation/data sources/research materials. 36 Summary. 39 Chapter 3: Methodology. 42 Introduction. 42 Statement of the Problem.. 43 Research Questions and/or Hypotheses. 44 Research Methodology. 45 Research Design. 47 Population and Sample Selection. 48 Quantitative sample size. 49 Qualitative sample size. 50 Research Materials, Instrumentation OR Sources of Data. 54 Trustworthiness (for Qualitative Studies) 58 Credibility. 59 Transferability. 60 Dependability. 60 Confirmability. 61 Validity (for Quantitative Studies) 61 Reliability (for Quantitative Studies) 63 Data Collection and Management 64 Data Analysis Procedures. 66 Ethical Considerations. 69 Limitations and Delimitations. 72 Summary. 73 Chapter 4: Data Analysis and Results. 75 Introduction. 75 Descriptive Findings. 76 Data Analysis Procedures. 80 Results. 82 Summary. 90 Chapter 5: Summary, Conclusions, and Recommendations. 93 Introduction and Summary of Study. 93 Summary of Findings and Conclusion. 94 Implications. 97 Theoretical implications. 97 Practical implications. 98 Future implications. 98 Strengths and weaknesses of the study. 98 Recommendations. 99 Recommendations for future research. 99 Recommendations for future practice. 100 References. . 103 Appendix A. Site Authorization Letter(s) 108 Appendix B. IRB Approval Letter 109 Appendix C. Informed Consent 110 Appendix D. Copy of Instruments and Permissions Letters to Use the Instruments. 111 Appendix E. Power Analyses for Sample Size Calculation (Quantitative Only) 112 Appendix F. Additional Appendices. 113 List of TablesTable 1. Correct Formatting for a Multiple Line Table Title is Single Spacing and Should Look Like this Example……………………………………………………………… 78Table 2. Equality of Emotional Intelligence Mean Scores by Gender……………………….. 84Table 3. The Servant Leader……………………………………………………………………………….. 86 Note: Single space multiple-line table titles; double space between entries per example above. The List of Tables and List of Figures (styled as Table of Figures) have been formatted as such in this template. Update the List of Tables in the following manner: [Right click à Update Field à Update Entire Table], and the table title and subtitle will show up with the in-text formatting. After you update your List of Tables, you will need to manually remove the italics from each of your table titles per the example above. List of FiguresFigure 1. IRB alert………………………………………………………………………………………………. 70Figure 2. Correlation for SAT composite score and time spent on Facebook……………… 87 Note: single-space multiple line figure titles; double-space between entries per example in List of Tables on previous page. Use sentence case for figure titles. After you update your List of Figures, you will need to manually remove the italics per the example above. Chapter 1: Introduction to the Study IntroductionThis section describes what the researcher will investigate, including the research questions, hypotheses, and basic research design. The introduction develops the significance of the study by describing how the study is new or different from other studies, how it addresses something that is not already known or has not been studied before, or how it extends prior research on the topic in some way. This section should also briefly describe the basic nature of the study and provide an overview of the contents of Chapter 1.The GCU Dissertation Template provides the structure for the GCU dissertation. The template provides important narrative, instructions, and requirements in each chapter and section. Learners must read the narrative in each section to fully understand what is required and also review the section criteria table which provides exact details on how the section will be scored. As the learner writes each section, s/he should delete the narrative and “Help” comments, but leave the criterion table, after each section, as this is how the committee members will evaluate the learners work. Additionally, when inserting their own narrative into the template, leaners should never remove the headings , as these are already formatted, or “styled.” Removing the headings will cause the text to have to be reformatted, that is, you will need to reapply the style. “Styles” are a feature in Word that defines what the text looks like on the page. For example, the style “Heading 1, used for Chapter headings and the List of Tables title, the List of Figures title, the References title, and the Appendices title, has set up to conform to APA: bold, double spaced, “keep with next,” Times New Roman 12. In addition, the automatic TOC “reads” these styles so that the headings show up in the TOC and exactly match those in the text.The navigation pane in Word shows the first and second level headings that will appear in the Table of Contents. To access the navigation pane, click on Home in a Word document>View Pane. Learners should consult their course e-books for additional guidance on constructing the various sections of the template (e.g., Grand Canyon University, 2015, 2016, 2017a, 2017b).Learners should keep in mind that they will write Chapters 1 through 3 as the dissertation proposal. However, there are changes that typically need to be made in these chapters to enrich the content or to improve the readability as the final dissertation manuscript is written. Often, after data analysis is complete, the first three chapters will need revisions to reflect a more in-depth understanding of the topic and to ensure consistency. Engaging in scholarly writing, understanding the criterion rubrics, and focusing on continuous improvement will help facilitate timely progression.To ensure the quality of both the proposal and final dissertation and reduce the time for AQR reviews, writing needs to reflect doctoral level, scholarly-writing standards from the very first draft . Each section within the proposal or dissertation should be well organized and easy for the reader to follow. Each paragraph should be short, clear, and focused. A paragraph should (1) be three to eight sentences in length, (2) focus on one point, topic, or argument, (3) include a topic sentence the defines the focus for the paragraph, and (4) include a transition sentence to the next paragraph. Include one space after each period. There should be no grammatical, punctuation, sentence structure, or APA formatting errors. Verb tense is an important consideration for Chapters 1 through 3. For the proposal, the researcher uses future tense (e.g., “The purpose of this proposed study is to…”), whereas in the dissertation, the chapters are revised to reflect past tense (e.g., “The purpose of this study was to…”). Taking the time to ensure high-quality, scholarly writing for each draft will save learners time in all the steps of the development and review phases of the dissertation process.As a doctoral researcher, it is the learner’s responsibility to ensure the clarity, quality, and correctness of their writing and APA formatting. The DC Network provides various resources to help learners improve their writing. Grand Canyon University also offers writing tutoring services through the Center for Learning Advancement on writing basics; however, the writing tutors do not provide any level of dissertation editing. The chair and committee members are not obligated to edit documents. Additionally, the AQR reviewers will not edit the proposal or dissertation. If learners do not have outstanding writing skills, they may need to identify a writing coach, editor, and/or other resource to help with writing and editing. Poorly-written proposals and dissertations will be immediately suspended in the various levels of review if submitted with grammatical, structural, and/or form-and-formatting errors.The quality of a dissertation is evaluated on the quality of writing and based on the criteria that GCU has established for each section of the dissertation. The criteria describe what must be addressed in each section within each chapter. As learners develop a section, first read the section description. Then, review each criterion contained in the table below the description. Learners use both the overall description and criteria as they write each section. Address each listed criterion in a way that it is clear to the chair and committee members. Learners should be able to point out where each criterion is met in each section.Prior to submitting a draft of the proposal or dissertation or a single chapter to the chair or committee members, learners should assess the degree to which each criterion has been met. Use the criteria table at the end of each section to complete this self-assessment. The following scores reflect the readiness of the document: 0 = Item Not Present or Unacceptable. Substantial Revisions Are Required. 1 = Item is Present. Does Not Meet Expectations. Revisions are Required. 2 = Item is Acceptable. Meets Expectations. 3 = Item is Exemplary. No Revisions Required. Sometimes the chair and committee members will score the work “between” numbers, such as a 1.5 or 2.5. The important thing to remember is that a minimum score of 2 is required on each criterion on the prospectus, proposal and dissertation before one can move to the next step. A good guideline to remember is that learners are not finished with the dissertation until the dean signs the cover page. Learners need to continuously and objectively self-evaluate the quality of writing and content for each section within the proposal or dissertation. Learners will score their work using the learner column in the criteria tables as evidence that they have critically evaluated their own work. When learners have completed a realistic, comprehensive self-evaluation of their work, then they may submit the document to the chair for review. Rating work as all 3’s will indicate that the learner has not done this. The chair will also review and score each section of the proposal and dissertation and will determine when it is ready for full committee review. Keep in mind the committee review process will likely require several editorial/revisions rounds, so plan for multiple revision cycles as learners develop their dissertation completion plan and project timeline. Notice the tables that certain columns have an X in the scoring box. As mentioned above, the chair will score all five chapters, the abstract and the reference list; the methodologist is only required to score Chapters 1, 3, and 4 and the abstract; the content expert is only required to score Chapters 1, 2, and 5 and the abstract. The chair and committee members will assess each criterion in their required chapters when they return the document with feedback.Once the document has been fully scored and approved by the chair and committee, and is approved for Level 2 or 5 review, the chair will submit one copy of the proposal or dissertation document with the fully scored assessment tables and one copy of the document with the assessment tables removed for AQR review. Refer to the Dissertation Milestone Guide for descriptions of levels of review and submission process. Criterion *(Score = 0, 1, 2, or 3) Learner Score Chair Score Methodologist Score Content Expert Score Introduction This section provides a brief overview of the research focus or problem, explains why this study is worth conducting, and discusses how this study will be completed. (Minimum three to four paragraphs or approximately one page) Dissertation topic is introduced and value of conducting the study is discussed. Discussion provides an overview of what is contained in the chapter. Section is written in a way that is well structured, has a logical flow, uses correct paragraph structure, uses correct sentence structure, uses correct punctuation, and uses correct APA format. *Score each requirement listed in the criteria table using the following scale: 0 = Item Not Present or Unacceptable. Substantial Revisions are Required.1 = Item is Present. Does Not Meet Expectations. Revisions are Required.2 = Item is Acceptable. Meets Expectations. Some Revisions May be Suggested or Required.3 = Item Exceeds Expectations. No Revisions are Required. Reviewer Comments: Background of the StudyThe background section of Chapter 1 describes the recent history of the problem under study. It provides a summary of results from the prior empirical research on the topic. First, the learner identifies the need for the study, referred to as a gap, which the dissertation study will address. Strategies learners can use to identify a need or gap include: Using results from prior studies. Using recommendations for further study. Using societal problems documented in the literature. Using broad areas of research in current empirical articles. Using needs identified in three to five research studies (primarily from the last three years. Next, the learner builds an argument or justification for the current study by presenting a series of logical arguments, each supported with citations from the literature. This need, called a gap, developed from the literature, is the basis for creating the problem statement. A local need is appropriate for a study. However, the learner needs to situate the “need” or problem by discussing how it is applicable beyond the local setting and contributes to societal and/or professional needs. The problem statement is developed based on the need or gap defined in the Background to the Study section. Criterion *(Score = 0, 1, 2, or 3) Learner Score Chair Score Methodologist Score Content Expert Score Background of the Study Minimum two to three paragraphs or approximately one page The background section of Chapter 1 provides a brief history of the problem.Provides a summary of results from the prior empirical research on the topic. Using results, societal needs, recommendations for further study, or needs identified in three to five research studies (primarily from the last three years), the learner identifies the stated need, called a gap.Builds a justification for the current study, using a logical set of arguments supported by citations. The problem is discussed as applicable beyond the local setting and contributes to societal and/or professional needs. Section is written in a way that is well structured, has a logical flow, uses correct paragraph structure, uses correct sentence structure, uses correct punctuation, and uses correct APA format. *Score each requirement listed in the criteria table using the following scale: 0 = Item Not Present or Unacceptable. Substantial Revisions are Required.1 = Item is Present. Does Not Meet Expectations. Revisions are Required.2 = Item is Acceptable. Meets Expectations. Some Revisions May be Suggested or Required.3 = Item Exceeds Expectations. No Revisions are Required. Reviewer Comments: Problem StatementResearch problems are socially constructed, meaning that a problem may not be considered one until society recognizes it as a problem. For example, spousal abuse was recognized as a problem after women earned more rights. Research problems are not determined only by how much one knows about it, but by the need to investigate phenomena that affect people in order to improve their lives (Krysik & Flynn, 2013).The Problem Statement section begins with a declarative statement of the problem under study, such as “It is not known if and to what degree/extent…” or “It is not known how/why…” Other examples are: It is not known _____. Absent from the literature is______. While the literature indicates ____________, it is not known in (school/district/organization/community) if __________. This section then describes general population affected by the problem along with the importance, scope or opportunity for the problem and the importance of addressing the problem. Questions to consider when writing the problem include: What is the need in the world or gap in the literature that this problem statement addresses? What is the real issue that is affecting society, students, organizations? At what frequency is the problem occurring? What is the extent of human suffering that the problem produces? Why has the problem received lack of attention in the past? What does the literature and research say about the problem that can and should be addressed at this time? What are the negative outcomes that this issue is addressing? This section ends with a description of the unit of analysis, which is the phenomenon, individuals, group or organization under study. Specifically, at the conceptual level, the unit of analysis is the entity/thing (social organization, community, group, individual, social artifacts, policies/principles, or phenomenon) that the researcher wants to be able to say something about. It is the main focus of the study. The unit of analysis is that which the researcher is studying. At the implementation level, the unit of analysis gets determined and defined by the research question/problem statement. Criterion * (Score = 0, 1, 2, or 3) Learner Score Chair Score Methodologist Score Content Expert Score States the specific problem proposed for research with a clear declarative statement.Discusses the problem statement in relation to the gap or need in the world, considering such issues as: real issues affecting society, students, or organizations; the frequency that the problem occurs; the extent of human suffering the problem produces, the perceived lack of attention in the past; the discussion of the problem in the literature and research about what should be addressed vis à vis the problem; the negative outcomes the issue addresses. Describes the general population affected by the problem. The general population refers to all individuals that could be affected by the study problem.Example: All older adults in the US who are 65 yrs. or older. The target population is a more specific sub-population of interest from the general population, such as low income older adults (? 65 yrs.) in AZ. Thus, the sample is derived from the target population, not from the general one. Describes the unit of analysis, which is the phenomenon, individuals, group or organization under study. Discusses the importance, scope, or opportunity for the problem and the importance of addressing the problem. Section is written in a way that is well structured, has a logical flow, uses correct paragraph structure, uses correct sentence structure, uses correct punctuation, and uses correct APA format. *Score each requirement listed in the criteria table using the following scale: 0 = Item Not Present or Unacceptable. Substantial Revisions are Required.1 = Item is Present. Does Not Meet Expectations. Revisions are Required.2 = Item is Acceptable. Meets Expectations. Some Revisions May be Suggested or Required.3 = Item Exceeds Expectations. No Revisions are Required. Reviewer Comments: Purpose of the StudyThe Purpose of the Study section of Chapter 1 provides a reflection of the problem statement and identifies how the study will be accomplished. It explains how the proposed study will contribute to the field. The section begins with a declarative statement, “The purpose of this study is….” Included in this statement are also the research design, target population, variables (quantitative) or phenomena (qualitative) to be studied, and the geographic location. Further, the section clearly defines the variables, relationship of variables, or comparison of groups for quantitative studies. For qualitative studies, this section describes the nature of the phenomenon/a to be explored. Keep in mind that the purpose of the study is restated in other chapters of the dissertation and should be worded exactly as presented in this section of Chapter 1. Criterion *(Score = 0, 1, 2, or 3) Learner Score Chair Score Methodologist Score Content Expert Score PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Minimum two to three paragraphs Begins with one sentence that identifies the research methodology and design, target population, variables (quantitative) or phenomena (qualitative) to be studied and geographic location.This can be presented as a declarative statement: “The purpose of this study is….” that identifies the research methodology and design, population, variables (quantitative) or phenomena (qualitative) to be studied and geographic location. Describes the target population and geographic location. Quantitative Studies : Defines the variables and relationship of variables. Qualitative Studies : Describes the nature of the phenomena to be explored. Section is written in a way that is well structured, has a logical flow, uses correct paragraph structure, uses correct sentence structure, uses correct punctuation, and uses correct APA format. *Score each requirement listed in the criteria table using the following scale: 0 = Item Not Present or Unacceptable. Substantial Revisions are Required.1 = Item is Present. Does Not Meet Expectations. Revisions are Required.2 = Item is Acceptable. Meets Expectations. Some Revisions May be Suggested or Required.3 = Item Exceeds Expectations. No Revisions are Required. Reviewer Comments: Research Questions and/or HypothesesThis section narrows the focus of the study and specifies the research questions to address the problem statement. Based on the research questions, it describes the variables or groups and their hypothesized relationship for a quantitative study or the phenomena under investigation for a qualitative study. The research questions and hypotheses should be derived from, and are directly aligned with, the problem statement and theoretical foundation (theory(s) or model(s). The Research Questions and/or Hypotheses section of Chapter 1 will be presented again in Chapter 3 to provide clear continuity for the reader and to help frame data analysis in Chapter 4.If the study is qualitative, state the research questions the study will answer, and describe the phenomenon to be studied. Qualitative studies will typically have one overarching research question with three or more subquestions. If the study is quantitative or mixed methods, state the research questions the study will answer, identify the variables, and state the hypotheses (predictive statements) using the format appropriate for the specific design. For quantitative studies, the research questions align with the purpose statement. Q

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