Assignment: Advanced Research Writing Literature Review

Assignment: Advanced Research Writing Literature Review ORDER NOW FOR CUSTOMIZED AND ORIGINAL ESSAY PAPERS ON Assignment: Advanced Research Writing Literature Review 10 Source, minimum 2000 word Literature Review. Attached are the assignment instructions along with a “spider diagram” I did for last weeks discussion of potential categories and questions to be answered in the Lit Review. wa__4_literature_review_instructions.pdf lit_review_spider_diagram.pdf lit_review_sample_1.docx lit_review_sample_2.docx lit_review_sample_3.doc Assignment: Advanced Research Writing Literature Review Influences on Personal Opinions about Climate Change Student UMUC Influences on Personal Opinions about Climate Change Introduction Is climate change real? Is it anthropogenic, or influenced by human behavior? What influences the public’s beliefs on the occurrence of climate change? Despite overwhelming evidence and consensus among the scientific community that climate change is occurring and anthropogenic, public disbelief on both accounts is surprisingly strong. Of the research referenced for this literature review, all agree political ideology is the overwhelming factor in a persons’ belief or disbelief. These studies give insight as to how actual knowledge of climate change, media sources used to attain that knowledge, geography, gender, income, racial and ethnic identity and religiosity affect a person’s view. They shed light on how these factors interact with political affiliation and their ability to offset political ideology. Influence of Political Ideology The studies referenced here, and others, mention how political ideology is the primary predictor of whether a person believes in climate change, considers it anthropogenic, or will sup-port public policy to control it. Separating political ideology into its own topic is difficult due to it being so interwoven in most aspects of our daily lives. Borick and Rabe (2010) deliberate on the chicken-and-the-egg phenomenon in their paper examining factors that determine views of climate change. They discuss the psychological connection of belonging to a particular social group that provides social identity. They reference conclusions by sociologists and psychologists in trying to understand the physiological and cognitive traits that influence public opinion. The human need to belong to groups as they provide social identity, eliminate ambiguity and sensory sensitivity to political communications, are suggested as primary influencers that being in a political group influences thinking on climate change. However, it is also just as likely that having certain beliefs may make you more likely to identify with a group. Thus, the authors come to no conclusion as to whether a person believes in climate change based on Republican or Democratic Party affiliation or if personal beliefs in climate change determine his or her affiliation to a political party. Educational Influences Education is the second best predictor of belief in climate change and is often mentioned in studies as a counterweight to political ideology. Studies diverge, however, as to whether this is really the case. Williams (2011) sought to unearth how an individual’s choice of news sources, intentional and not, affect beliefs of anthropogenic climate change. What she calls “segmented media” sources — radio, magazines and the internet — she finds are particularly targeted at a similarly minded audience. She further discusses a theory called “selective exposure.” This theory suggests how a person’s predispositions reflect where they go to seek out information. They “selectively expose” themselves to news or ideas that reinforce their predispositions. Her paper discusses this theory in terms of both intentional and inadvertent information exposure. Williams mentions that search engine algorithms like Google take not only current search terms but also previous search terms into account when returning results. This means then that an internet search on the same topic by two people has the potential to yield very different search results. This affects the quality of the results and the ability to educate fully. It may also explain the finding that Republicans have a higher distrust in the media than Democrats do, and even Re-publicans who do believe in climate change, believe the media exaggerates it (Borick & Rabe 2010). Kilburn (2014) agrees that personal inclination to rely on particularly opinionated media sources moves a person in one direction or another on concern of climate change. News and internet sources can do the disservice of forming an echo chamber, reinforcing a person’s false assumptions that climate change is not occurring nor anthropogenic. As a result, a person is less likely to act constructively or support beneficial public policy.Assignment: Advanced Research Writing Literature Review The previously mentioned studies discuss influences on beliefs among adults. In a study focusing on adolescents, Stevenson, Peterson, and Bradshaw (2016) researched whether teacher beliefs influenced their students. The authors found that teachers who believed in climate change were teaching 92% of students, but teachers who believed it was anthropogenic taught only 12% of students. Their study concluded that even if a teacher did not believe in human-causation of climate change, students are yet were able to draw their own conclusions that climate change is happening and anthropogenic. While they may yet be too young to have developed significant ideological leanings like their parents, adolescents can still be guided by what they see their family and friends’ beliefs to be. Stevenson et al. (2016) point out “Although climate change knowledge may more directly influence beliefs among adolescents than among adults, other insights on adolescent perceptions of climate change suggest that socio-cultural factors such as gender, ethnicity and descriptive norms may shape climate change beliefs, raising questions about the relative importance of teacher climate change beliefs on those of their students.” Guy, Kashima, Walker, O’Neill (2014) found that people with actual specific knowledge of climatic processes and human affects of climate change were more willing to accept the occurrence of climate change, and found this knowledge could diminish the effect of a person’s political ideology. They also theorized that those who agree with the scientific community on climate change are more likely to pursue accurate evidence about it. On the other hand, the study by Hamilton, Hartter, Lemcke-Stampone, Moore and Safford (2015), found the opposite. They establish that even if a person is knowledgeable about the detrimental effects of climate change, political leanings negate the normally considered positive effects of education. They also theorize that a more educated person may just be better at finding information that aligns with their preconceptions. Guy, et al. (2014) agree. Their study found that perceived scientific knowledge intensified the effect of ideology. Which may explain why their study establishes that the more educated a Republican is, the less likely they are to believe climate change is occurring and anthropogenic. Whereas the more educated a Democrat is, the more likely they are to believe. Other Influential Factors Geography Geography is one of numerous factors that can sway beliefs on climate change. Borick and Rabe (2010) say that geography does not seem to be a determining factor in general, and that mainstream Republicans are generally less likely to believe in climate change. For those that do believe in climate change, personal experience with hotter weather or extreme storms is a factor though. In a specific case, they did find that Mississippians in particular are more likely to believe. They theorize this is due to hurricanes Dennis, Rita and Katrina being fresh in respondents’ minds. This aligns with what Hamilton, et al. (2015) found. Their study was conducted in New Hampshire, which did not take the direct hit from Hurricane Sandy and so they felt it had little, if any, statistical impact on beliefs. Gender Gender is often referenced as an influential factor in belief of climate change, though neither of the studies referenced here give reasons why. Hamilton, et al. (2015) state that if all other factors remain the same, women are 21% more likely to believe that climate change is happening and human caused. The study by Borick and Rabe (2010), found correlation between certain demographics and influencing factors, specifically, that “Gender had a statistically significant effect on five factors, with women more likely than men to re-port that local temperatures, hurricanes, declining polar bears, the Gore documentary, and droughts have increased belief in global warming” (p. 790). Income Belief or disbelief in climate change is also dependent upon income. Borick and Rabe (2010) mention that “Family income affects the impact of a number of factors regarding belief in global warming, with lower-income individuals more likely than wealthier individuals to report that hurricanes and drought made them more likely to acknowledge climate change” (p.790). Going into more detail, Williams (2011) presumes that wealthier people are happy with their social status, so are more likely to believe that they can keep their wealth if they deny their actions contribute to climate change or keep their status quo by voting against policy changes. Whether comparing wealthy versus low-income populations within a single country or industrialized nations versus nations with less developed economies, those populations with the least amount of resources are often the ones most impacted by a changing climate. They also bear a proportionally greater burden in mitigating it. Much of the studies here focus on the United States or other industrialized countries. A study by Running (2014) draws attention globally via international surveys and reports from the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. She pointed out that economic and industrial development is largely responsible for current environmental problems, and that the economic benefits of that industrialization have not been equitably distributed. She recommends a cost-benefit analysis of economically diverse populations before mitigation policies are established, so those that have created the pollution are also responsible for alleviating it, not shifting the burden to the most vulnerable. Race Racial or ethnic identity coupled with majority/minority status proves to be a unique factor on belief in climate change. Shuldt and Pearson (2016) conducted a study that showed non-Whites are more likely to base their feelings on climate change by their susceptibility to the negative effects of climate change. Interestingly, their study found that though non-Whites are more likely to believe in climate change, they are not more likely than Whites to support policies to mitigate it, nor are they more likely to identify themselves as “environmentalists.” As previously mentioned, being a Democrat or Republican likely identifies a person as a believer or non-believer in climate change, respectively. Not so for non-Whites. This study shows that political ideology holds much less sway than for non-Whites. Understanding the beliefs of this demographic is important for developing public policy and garnering their support.Assignment: Advanced Research Writing Literature Review Religiosity As previously discussed, a person identifying himself or herself as a Republican is less likely to believe climate change is occurring and less likely to believe it is anthropogenic. General thought equates religiosity to conservatism and therefore belonging to the Republican Party. That is an oversimplification of the nuances and influence of different faiths. A paper by Kilburn (2014) discusses how evangelical Protestants are Bible literalists who believe climate change is natural in origin. Ironically, this group was found to be more concerned about climate change than the religiously unaffiliated. His study concluded that while climate change is highly politicized and political identity does have some effect on personal beliefs, religious beliefs do not automatically mean personal concern is in line with political party ideology. Conclusion Scientists are in near-unanimous agreement about climate change but the public lags behind. While belief in climate change is intertwined with a person’s political ideology, that political ideology is formed by, and interconnected with, the numerous factors discussed here. The study by Nisbet and Myers (2007) provide a great primer on overall how the public views various aspects of climate change. They elaborate on the public’s awareness and understanding of climate change, the confidence in the science behind it, concern for climate change consequences and policy support for actions. They found the American public scored very low on actual knowledge, as illustrated by the confusion of climate change with ozone depletion. They assume that due to deliberate misinformation by some media sources, the public also scored low on whether scientists were in consensus about the reality of climate change. As for accepting policies that impact economic interests, their study concluded that people would support policies such as limiting industry and automobile emissions or tax incentives for using solar or wind power, but did not support policies that would regulate personal behavior. Borick and Rabe (2010) bring up a great point about the importance of understanding who believes in climate change. They also urge policy makers about the necessity to understand the substantial subset of the public that does not. Sibley and Kurz (2013) argue that getting people to agree on anthropogenic causes is not necessarily an impediment in gathering support for or willingness to act on public policies. They concluded that personal belief in climate change a more likely to affect a change in behavior or willingness to accept a change in living standards than whether a person believed climate change is anthropogenic. This suggests that focusing more time, money and resources on educating the public about the reality of climate change vice the responsibility humans play, will have greater effect on conservation efforts and support for local policies and international agreements. References Borick, C. P., & Rabe, B. G. (2010). A reason to believe: examining the factors that determine individual views on global warming. Social Science Quarterly (Wiley-Blackwell), 91 (3), 777-800. doi:10.1111/j.1540-6237.2010.00719.x Guy S., Kashima Y., Walker I., and O’Neill S. (2014), Investigating the effects of knowledge and ideology on climate change beliefs, European Journal of Social Psychology, 44 (5), 421-429. doi: 10.1002/ejsp.2039 Hamilton, L. C., Hartter, J., Lemcke-Stampone, M., Moore, D. W., & Safford, T. G. (2015). Tracking public beliefs about anthropogenic climate change. Plos One, 10 (9), e0138208. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0138208 Kilburn, H. W. (2014). Religion and foundations of American public opinion towards global cli-mate change. Environmental Politics, 23 (3), 473-489. doi:10.1080/09644016.2013.859777 Nisbet, M. C., & Myers, T. (2007). The polls–Trends: Twenty years of public opinion about global warming. Public Opinion Quarterly, 71 (3), 444-470. doi:10.1093/poq/nfm031 Running, K. (2015). Towards climate justice: How do the most vulnerable weigh environment–economy trade-offs?. Social Science Research , 50217-228. doi:10.1016/j.ssresearch.2014.11.018 Sibley, C. G., & Kurz, T. (2013). A model of climate belief profiles: How much does it matter if people question human causation?. Analyses of Social Issues & Public Policy, 13 (1), 245-261. doi:10.1111/asap.12008 Schuldt, J. P., & Pearson, A. R. (2016). The role of race and ethnicity in climate change polarization: evidence from a U.S. national survey experiment. Climatic Change, 136 , 495-505. doi: 10.1007/s10584-016-1631-3 Stevenson, K. T., Peterson, M. N., & Bradshaw, A. (2016). How climate change beliefs among U.S. teachers do and do not translate to students. Plos ONE, 11 (9), 1. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0161462 Williams, A. E. (2011). Media evolution and public understanding of climate science. Politics & the Life Sciences, 30 (2), 20-30. doi.org/10.2990/30_2_20 Get a 10 % discount on an order above $ 100 Use the following coupon code : NURSING10

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Assignment: Advanced Research Writing Literature Review

Assignment: Advanced Research Writing Literature Review ORDER NOW FOR CUSTOMIZED AND ORIGINAL ESSAY PAPERS ON Assignment: Advanced Research Writing Literature Review 10 Source, minimum 2000 word Literature Review. Attached are the assignment instructions along with a “spider diagram” I did for last weeks discussion of potential categories and questions to be answered in the Lit Review. wa__4_literature_review_instructions.pdf lit_review_spider_diagram.pdf lit_review_sample_1.docx lit_review_sample_2.docx lit_review_sample_3.doc Assignment: Advanced Research Writing Literature Review Influences on Personal Opinions about Climate Change Student UMUC Influences on Personal Opinions about Climate Change Introduction Is climate change real? Is it anthropogenic, or influenced by human behavior? What influences the public’s beliefs on the occurrence of climate change? Despite overwhelming evidence and consensus among the scientific community that climate change is occurring and anthropogenic, public disbelief on both accounts is surprisingly strong. Of the research referenced for this literature review, all agree political ideology is the overwhelming factor in a persons’ belief or disbelief. These studies give insight as to how actual knowledge of climate change, media sources used to attain that knowledge, geography, gender, income, racial and ethnic identity and religiosity affect a person’s view. They shed light on how these factors interact with political affiliation and their ability to offset political ideology. Influence of Political Ideology The studies referenced here, and others, mention how political ideology is the primary predictor of whether a person believes in climate change, considers it anthropogenic, or will sup-port public policy to control it. Separating political ideology into its own topic is difficult due to it being so interwoven in most aspects of our daily lives. Borick and Rabe (2010) deliberate on the chicken-and-the-egg phenomenon in their paper examining factors that determine views of climate change. They discuss the psychological connection of belonging to a particular social group that provides social identity. They reference conclusions by sociologists and psychologists in trying to understand the physiological and cognitive traits that influence public opinion. The human need to belong to groups as they provide social identity, eliminate ambiguity and sensory sensitivity to political communications, are suggested as primary influencers that being in a political group influences thinking on climate change. However, it is also just as likely that having certain beliefs may make you more likely to identify with a group. Thus, the authors come to no conclusion as to whether a person believes in climate change based on Republican or Democratic Party affiliation or if personal beliefs in climate change determine his or her affiliation to a political party. Educational Influences Education is the second best predictor of belief in climate change and is often mentioned in studies as a counterweight to political ideology. Studies diverge, however, as to whether this is really the case. Williams (2011) sought to unearth how an individual’s choice of news sources, intentional and not, affect beliefs of anthropogenic climate change. What she calls “segmented media” sources — radio, magazines and the internet — she finds are particularly targeted at a similarly minded audience. She further discusses a theory called “selective exposure.” This theory suggests how a person’s predispositions reflect where they go to seek out information. They “selectively expose” themselves to news or ideas that reinforce their predispositions. Her paper discusses this theory in terms of both intentional and inadvertent information exposure. Williams mentions that search engine algorithms like Google take not only current search terms but also previous search terms into account when returning results. This means then that an internet search on the same topic by two people has the potential to yield very different search results. This affects the quality of the results and the ability to educate fully. It may also explain the finding that Republicans have a higher distrust in the media than Democrats do, and even Re-publicans who do believe in climate change, believe the media exaggerates it (Borick & Rabe 2010). Kilburn (2014) agrees that personal inclination to rely on particularly opinionated media sources moves a person in one direction or another on concern of climate change. News and internet sources can do the disservice of forming an echo chamber, reinforcing a person’s false assumptions that climate change is not occurring nor anthropogenic. As a result, a person is less likely to act constructively or support beneficial public policy.Assignment: Advanced Research Writing Literature Review The previously mentioned studies discuss influences on beliefs among adults. In a study focusing on adolescents, Stevenson, Peterson, and Bradshaw (2016) researched whether teacher beliefs influenced their students. The authors found that teachers who believed in climate change were teaching 92% of students, but teachers who believed it was anthropogenic taught only 12% of students. Their study concluded that even if a teacher did not believe in human-causation of climate change, students are yet were able to draw their own conclusions that climate change is happening and anthropogenic. While they may yet be too young to have developed significant ideological leanings like their parents, adolescents can still be guided by what they see their family and friends’ beliefs to be. Stevenson et al. (2016) point out “Although climate change knowledge may more directly influence beliefs among adolescents than among adults, other insights on adolescent perceptions of climate change suggest that socio-cultural factors such as gender, ethnicity and descriptive norms may shape climate change beliefs, raising questions about the relative importance of teacher climate change beliefs on those of their students.” Guy, Kashima, Walker, O’Neill (2014) found that people with actual specific knowledge of climatic processes and human affects of climate change were more willing to accept the occurrence of climate change, and found this knowledge could diminish the effect of a person’s political ideology. They also theorized that those who agree with the scientific community on climate change are more likely to pursue accurate evidence about it. On the other hand, the study by Hamilton, Hartter, Lemcke-Stampone, Moore and Safford (2015), found the opposite. They establish that even if a person is knowledgeable about the detrimental effects of climate change, political leanings negate the normally considered positive effects of education. They also theorize that a more educated person may just be better at finding information that aligns with their preconceptions. Guy, et al. (2014) agree. Their study found that perceived scientific knowledge intensified the effect of ideology. Which may explain why their study establishes that the more educated a Republican is, the less likely they are to believe climate change is occurring and anthropogenic. Whereas the more educated a Democrat is, the more likely they are to believe. Other Influential Factors Geography Geography is one of numerous factors that can sway beliefs on climate change. Borick and Rabe (2010) say that geography does not seem to be a determining factor in general, and that mainstream Republicans are generally less likely to believe in climate change. For those that do believe in climate change, personal experience with hotter weather or extreme storms is a factor though. In a specific case, they did find that Mississippians in particular are more likely to believe. They theorize this is due to hurricanes Dennis, Rita and Katrina being fresh in respondents’ minds. This aligns with what Hamilton, et al. (2015) found. Their study was conducted in New Hampshire, which did not take the direct hit from Hurricane Sandy and so they felt it had little, if any, statistical impact on beliefs. Gender Gender is often referenced as an influential factor in belief of climate change, though neither of the studies referenced here give reasons why. Hamilton, et al. (2015) state that if all other factors remain the same, women are 21% more likely to believe that climate change is happening and human caused. The study by Borick and Rabe (2010), found correlation between certain demographics and influencing factors, specifically, that “Gender had a statistically significant effect on five factors, with women more likely than men to re-port that local temperatures, hurricanes, declining polar bears, the Gore documentary, and droughts have increased belief in global warming” (p. 790). Income Belief or disbelief in climate change is also dependent upon income. Borick and Rabe (2010) mention that “Family income affects the impact of a number of factors regarding belief in global warming, with lower-income individuals more likely than wealthier individuals to report that hurricanes and drought made them more likely to acknowledge climate change” (p.790). Going into more detail, Williams (2011) presumes that wealthier people are happy with their social status, so are more likely to believe that they can keep their wealth if they deny their actions contribute to climate change or keep their status quo by voting against policy changes. Whether comparing wealthy versus low-income populations within a single country or industrialized nations versus nations with less developed economies, those populations with the least amount of resources are often the ones most impacted by a changing climate. They also bear a proportionally greater burden in mitigating it. Much of the studies here focus on the United States or other industrialized countries. A study by Running (2014) draws attention globally via international surveys and reports from the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. She pointed out that economic and industrial development is largely responsible for current environmental problems, and that the economic benefits of that industrialization have not been equitably distributed. She recommends a cost-benefit analysis of economically diverse populations before mitigation policies are established, so those that have created the pollution are also responsible for alleviating it, not shifting the burden to the most vulnerable. Race Racial or ethnic identity coupled with majority/minority status proves to be a unique factor on belief in climate change. Shuldt and Pearson (2016) conducted a study that showed non-Whites are more likely to base their feelings on climate change by their susceptibility to the negative effects of climate change. Interestingly, their study found that though non-Whites are more likely to believe in climate change, they are not more likely than Whites to support policies to mitigate it, nor are they more likely to identify themselves as “environmentalists.” As previously mentioned, being a Democrat or Republican likely identifies a person as a believer or non-believer in climate change, respectively. Not so for non-Whites. This study shows that political ideology holds much less sway than for non-Whites. Understanding the beliefs of this demographic is important for developing public policy and garnering their support.Assignment: Advanced Research Writing Literature Review Religiosity As previously discussed, a person identifying himself or herself as a Republican is less likely to believe climate change is occurring and less likely to believe it is anthropogenic. General thought equates religiosity to conservatism and therefore belonging to the Republican Party. That is an oversimplification of the nuances and influence of different faiths. A paper by Kilburn (2014) discusses how evangelical Protestants are Bible literalists who believe climate change is natural in origin. Ironically, this group was found to be more concerned about climate change than the religiously unaffiliated. His study concluded that while climate change is highly politicized and political identity does have some effect on personal beliefs, religious beliefs do not automatically mean personal concern is in line with political party ideology. Conclusion Scientists are in near-unanimous agreement about climate change but the public lags behind. While belief in climate change is intertwined with a person’s political ideology, that political ideology is formed by, and interconnected with, the numerous factors discussed here. The study by Nisbet and Myers (2007) provide a great primer on overall how the public views various aspects of climate change. They elaborate on the public’s awareness and understanding of climate change, the confidence in the science behind it, concern for climate change consequences and policy support for actions. They found the American public scored very low on actual knowledge, as illustrated by the confusion of climate change with ozone depletion. They assume that due to deliberate misinformation by some media sources, the public also scored low on whether scientists were in consensus about the reality of climate change. As for accepting policies that impact economic interests, their study concluded that people would support policies such as limiting industry and automobile emissions or tax incentives for using solar or wind power, but did not support policies that would regulate personal behavior. Borick and Rabe (2010) bring up a great point about the importance of understanding who believes in climate change. They also urge policy makers about the necessity to understand the substantial subset of the public that does not. Sibley and Kurz (2013) argue that getting people to agree on anthropogenic causes is not necessarily an impediment in gathering support for or willingness to act on public policies. They concluded that personal belief in climate change a more likely to affect a change in behavior or willingness to accept a change in living standards than whether a person believed climate change is anthropogenic. This suggests that focusing more time, money and resources on educating the public about the reality of climate change vice the responsibility humans play, will have greater effect on conservation efforts and support for local policies and international agreements. References Borick, C. P., & Rabe, B. G. (2010). A reason to believe: examining the factors that determine individual views on global warming. Social Science Quarterly (Wiley-Blackwell), 91 (3), 777-800. doi:10.1111/j.1540-6237.2010.00719.x Guy S., Kashima Y., Walker I., and O’Neill S. (2014), Investigating the effects of knowledge and ideology on climate change beliefs, European Journal of Social Psychology, 44 (5), 421-429. doi: 10.1002/ejsp.2039 Hamilton, L. C., Hartter, J., Lemcke-Stampone, M., Moore, D. W., & Safford, T. G. (2015). Tracking public beliefs about anthropogenic climate change. Plos One, 10 (9), e0138208. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0138208 Kilburn, H. W. (2014). Religion and foundations of American public opinion towards global cli-mate change. Environmental Politics, 23 (3), 473-489. doi:10.1080/09644016.2013.859777 Nisbet, M. C., & Myers, T. (2007). The polls–Trends: Twenty years of public opinion about global warming. Public Opinion Quarterly, 71 (3), 444-470. doi:10.1093/poq/nfm031 Running, K. (2015). Towards climate justice: How do the most vulnerable weigh environment–economy trade-offs?. Social Science Research , 50217-228. doi:10.1016/j.ssresearch.2014.11.018 Sibley, C. G., & Kurz, T. (2013). A model of climate belief profiles: How much does it matter if people question human causation?. Analyses of Social Issues & Public Policy, 13 (1), 245-261. doi:10.1111/asap.12008 Schuldt, J. P., & Pearson, A. R. (2016). The role of race and ethnicity in climate change polarization: evidence from a U.S. national survey experiment. Climatic Change, 136 , 495-505. doi: 10.1007/s10584-016-1631-3 Stevenson, K. T., Peterson, M. N., & Bradshaw, A. (2016). How climate change beliefs among U.S. teachers do and do not translate to students. Plos ONE, 11 (9), 1. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0161462 Williams, A. E. (2011). Media evolution and public understanding of climate science. Politics & the Life Sciences, 30 (2), 20-30. doi.org/10.2990/30_2_20 Get a 10 % discount on an order above $ 100 Use the following coupon code : NURSING10

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