Assignment: Diabetes And Drug Treatments

Assignment: Diabetes And Drug Treatments
Assignment: Diabetes And Drug Treatments
Diabetes is an endocrine system disorder that affects millions of children and adults (ADA, 2011). If left untreated, diabetic patients are at risk for several alterations including heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, neuropathy, and blindness. There are various methods for treating diabetes, many of which include some form of drug therapy. The type of diabetes as well as the patient’s behavior factors will impact treatment recommendations. In this Assignment, you compare types of diabetes including drug treatments for type 1, type 2, gestational, and juvenile diabetes.
To prepare:
· Review this week’s media presentation on the endocrine system and diabetes, as well as Chapter 46 of the Arcangelo and Peterson text and the Peterson et al. article in the Learning Resources.
· Reflect on differences between types of diabetes including type 1, type 2, gestational, and juvenile diabetes.
· Select one type of diabetes.
· Consider one type of drug used to treat the type of diabetes you selected including proper preparation and administration of this drug. Then, reflect on dietary considerations related to treatment.
· Think about the short-term and long-term impact of the diabetes you selected on patients including effects of drug treatments.
Write a 2- to 3- page paper that addresses the following:
· Explain the differences between types of diabetes including type 1, type 2, gestational, and juvenile diabetes.
· Describe one type of drug used to treat the type of diabetes you selected including proper preparation and administration of this drug. Include dietary considerations related to treatment.
· Explain the short-term and long-term impact of this diabetes on patients including effects of drugs treatments.
The glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test is commonly used to identify type 2 diabetes.
The average blood sugar level for the previous two to three months is determined by this blood test.
The following is how the results are interpreted:
A percentage of less than 5.7 percent is considered normal.
Prediabetes affects 5.7 percent to 6.4 percent of the population.
Diabetes is diagnosed when a person’s blood sugar level is 6.5 percent or above on two different tests.
Your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes if the A1C test isn’t available or if you have specific conditions that interfere with an A1C test:
A random blood sugar test was performed.
Milligrams of sugar per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles of sugar per liter (mmol/L) of blood are used to measure blood sugar levels.
A level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or greater, regardless of when you last ate, indicates diabetes, especially if you also have signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and severe thirst.
A blood sugar test is performed after a period of fasting.
After an overnight fast, a blood sample is collected.
The following is how the results are interpreted:
It is normal to have a blood sugar level of less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L).
Prediabetes is defined as a blood sugar level of 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L).
Diabetes is diagnosed when blood sugar levels are 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or greater on two different tests.
Test for oral glucose tolerance.
Except during pregnancy, this test is less prevalent than the others.
You’ll need to fast overnight before going to the doctor’s office and drinking a sweet liquid.
For the next two hours, blood sugar levels are checked at regular intervals.
The following is how the results are interpreted:
A blood sugar level of less than 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L) is considered normal.
Prediabetes is defined as a blood sugar level of 140 to 199 mg/dL (7.8 to 11.0 mmol/L).
After two hours, a blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or greater indicates diabetes.
Screening.
The American Diabetes Association recommends routine type 2 diabetes screening using diagnostic testing in all individuals 45 and older, as well as in the following groups:
People under the age of 45 who are overweight or obese and have one or more diabetes risk factors
Women who have experienced gestational diabetes are at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life.
People with prediabetes are those who have been diagnosed with the disease.
Overweight or obese children with a family history of type 2 diabetes or other risk factors
Following a diagnosis,
If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, your doctor or health-care provider may perform further tests to differentiate between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, as the two disorders often require distinct treatments.
Your health care practitioner will test your A1C levels at least twice a year and if your therapy changes.
The A1C target range varies based on your age and other factors.
The American Diabetes Association recommends an A1C level of less than 7% for most persons.
Regular diagnostic tests will be performed to check for diabetic complications or concomitant diseases.
Additional Information
The A1C test measures the amount of sugar in your blood.
Treatment for type 2 diabetes includes: Glucose tolerance testing
Consumption of nutritious foods
Exercise on a regular basis
Loss of weight
Diabetes medication or insulin therapy could be an option.
Monitoring of blood sugar levels
These methods will help you maintain a normal blood sugar level, which will help you avoid or delay issues.

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