Assignment: Hospital Falls Research

Assignment: Hospital Falls Research ORDER NOW FOR CUSTOMIZED AND ORIGINAL ESSAY PAPERS ON Assignment: Hospital Falls Research Write a 500-750 word description of your proposed capstone project topic. Make sure to include the following: Assignment: Hospital Falls Research The problem, issue, suggestion, initiative, or educational need that will be the focus of the project The setting or context in which the problem, issue, suggestion, initiative, or educational need can be observed. A description providing a high level of detail regarding the problem, issue, suggestion, initiative, or educational need. Impact of the problem, issue, suggestion, initiative, or educational need on the work environment, the quality of care provided by staff, and patient outcomes. Significance of the problem, issue, suggestion, initiative, or educational need and its implications to nursing. A proposed solution to the identified project topic You are required to retrieve and assess a minimum of 8 peer-reviewed articles. Please use only the articles that I have attached for the purpose of this paper. I have also attached an old paper that you can use to reword for this current paper. Assignment: Hospital Falls Research validation_of_nursing_outcome_content_fall_prevention_behavior_in_a_hospital_environment.pdf using_and_developing_the_evidence_base_in_primary_care.pdf understanding_inpatient_injurious_fall_rates_using_medicare_s_h_ospital_compare_data.pdf the_little_schmidy_pediatric_hospital_f…ent_index__a_diagnostic_accuracy_study.pdf outcome_of_in_patient_falls_in_hospitals_with_100__single_rooms_and_multi_bedded_wards_.pdf picot_falls.docx Literature Review Grand Canyon University: NRS 433V March 19, 2017 Since the 1950’s there has been a drastic global expansion of medical advancements in technology and practice, however the number of patient falls in hospitals has increased, occurring most frequently the bedside or in the bathroom of the hospital. Some factors influencing the rise in falls include patients being more heavily sedated, an improvement in accident reporting, a larger and more impaired elderly population, but most importantly is the decreasing amount of time that nurses spend bedside with a patient. Studies have proven that the more time nurses spend with a patient, improving the individuation of his or her care, the less likely they are to fall. For the growing pool of hospital patients 65 and older, will the increased presence of nurses at a patient’s bedside, compared to those receiving the current nurse attention, experience less falls during their stay in the hospital in addition to a lesser degree of severity in said falls. Assignment: Hospital Falls Research Dr. Weil, T (2015) presents different factors influencing the rising incidents of patient falls backed by studies and research in his article “Patient Falls in Hospitals: An Increasing Problem”. Dr. Weil lists improved reporting systems of patient incidents as a cause in the overall number of patient falls increasing, stating that “falls and related injuries are the most frequently reported adverse event among adults in hospital settings”. It is clear that with better methods of reporting patient falls in the hospital, there will be more reports of said falls, however the degree of increase in reports display more than just an increase of reporting of increasing patient falls. This suggests that patient falls are more closely linked to variables such as amount of time a nurse spends bedside with the patient and a lesser degree of sedation of patients to the increasing number of patient falls during their hospital stay. The article quotes that the amount of benzodiazepines prescribed to patients has a direct correlation with the patient’s risk of falling, especially at night when the majority of in hospital falls occur. One solution for this problem is to simply prescribe less drugs to the patients so they’re more aware and alert, or increasing the amount of nurse supervision and attention a patient receives along with the increased amount of sedatives they are prescribed. In a study conducted by Daiani Moraes Oliveira, Karina Silveira de Almeida Hammerschmidt, Soraia Dornelles Schoeller, Juliana Balbinot Reis Girondi, Katia Cilene Godinho Bertoncello, and Newton Ferreira de Paula Junior (2016), qualitative data was used to determine the best tools to assess the rest of falls among patients. This study was conducted in Brazil in the year 2014 due to the growing elderly population in Brazil, which is expected to surpass the amount of children and adolescents by 2030. The objective of the study was to determine an assessment of the risk a patient has of falling, the factor most closely looked in deciding the degree of risk was the patient’s vulnerability. Researchers determined that nurses spending the most time with the patients of highest vulnerability to a fall was successful in reducing both the severity and occurrences of falls in hospitals. In the article “Understanding Inpatient Injurious Fall Rates Using Medicare’s Hospital Compare Data”, by Huey-Ming Tzeng, Hsou Mei Hu, and Chang-Yi Yin (2016), the quantitative data regarding patient falls in hospital care is examined. This study was designed to explore the relationship between total bedside time with a nurse a patient has received to their risk of falls. Data revealed that hospitals that ranked highest in staff attentiveness had the the lowest rate of patient fall incidents. Hospitals that had more individual care, such as more private rooms and more nurses per patient, showed to have a much lower rate of patient falls. On the other hand, hospitals with multiple people per room and nurses fulfilling more duties and therefore spending less time bedside with patients had the highest rates of patient falls while in hospital care in the study. This study concluded that hospitals with the highest patient satisfaction measures held the lowest rates of patient falls due to many factors, but most significantly the degree of attention each patient received from a nurse. Assignment: Hospital Falls Research Literature Review Practice Problem/Issue and PICOT Question For the growing pool of hospital patients 65 and older, will the increased presence of nurses at a patient’s bedside, compared to those receiving the current nurse attention, experience less falls during their stay in the hospital in addition to a lesser degree of severity in said falls. References Moraes, D., De Almeida, K., Dornelles, S., Reis Girondi, J., Godinho, K., de Paula, N. (2016). Assessment Instrument for falls among the hospitalized elderly (Hospital aide): Nurse analyzing vulnerability and mobility. Journal Of Nursing UFPE / Revista De Enfermagem UFPE. 10(11):4065-4074. Available from: CINAHL Complete, Ipswich, MA. Accessed March 14, 2017. To develop a tool for assessing vulnerability to falls in hospitalized elderly. Method: exploratory and descriptive study with a qualitative approach. It conducted an evaluation of the items that make up the Assessment Instrument for Falls in Elderly (AIFE) used in the Family Health Strategy, selecting those related to vulnerability to falls in hospitalized elderly, focusing on mobility dimension. Results: some functional assessment tools were adapted and/or added, which outlined the AIFE Hospital, presented through schematic and visual flowchart figures. In it, the mobility was subdivided into individual (identification, sense organs, musculoskeletal system, assessment activities of daily life; assessment of balance and gait, history of falls and fractures) and environmental (environmental scale of risk of falls). Conclusion: IRAQI Hospital assists in determining the individual profile and vulnerability of the elderly, for the prevention of falls, actions are scheduled. Descriptors: Aged; Accidental Falls; Hospitalization; Nursing. Weil, T. (2015). Feature Article: Patient falls in hospitals: An increasing problem. Geriatric Nursing . 36:342-347. Retrieved from http://www.gnjournal.com/article/S0197-4572(15)00287-6/abstract?cc=y= Despite six decades of worldwide efforts that include publishing virtually hundreds of related epidemiological-type studies, there has been an increase (estimated to be 46% per 1000 patient days from 1954–6 to 2006–10) in the number of patient falls in hospitals and other health care facilities. These still occur most frequently near the bedside or in the bathroom, among mentally confused or physically impaired patients, and often involve those with greater comorbidity. The reasons that hospitals during the past half century have demonstrated a significant increase in patient falls per discharge or per patient days are numerous, are not completely surprising, and are certainly interrelated: improved accident reporting systems; on the average older, more impaired, more acutely ill, and more heavily sedated patients; and, less time spent by nursing personnel at the bedside. Most safety committees are not as effective as they should be, since they have difficulty in implementing a long-term, aggressive, facility-wide prevention program. Within that context, it may be worthwhile to discuss the advantages of nursing leadership rather than a representative of the facility’s management staff to chair these safety committees. Huey-Ming, T. (2016). Understanding Inpatient Injurious Fall Rates Using Medicare’s Hospital Compare Data. MEDSURG Nursing . 25(4):255-269. Retrieved from https://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-461945696.html Beginning in FY2009, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) ended payment for care needed to treat certain preventable inpatient injuries that occur during hospitalization (e.g., fractures, dislocations, intracranial injuries) and often are caused by patient falls. In October 2014, CMS began reducing Medicare payments for hospitals scoring in the top quartile for rates of harmful conditions experienced by patients during hospitalization. This hospital-acquired conditions reduction program continued in FY2016 (Government Printing Office [GPO], 2013a; Medicare.gov, 2016). In 2011, the national average rate for injurious falls that occurred during hospitalization was 0.53 per 1,000 Medicare fee-for-service discharges in U.S. acute care hospitals (CMS, 2013a). Wong and associates (2011) concluded hospital stays of patient fallers with serious injury in the United States could be 6.3 days longer compared with patients who do not fall during hospital stays. Inpatient injurious falls continue to be the most prevalent of eight adverse conditions identified by CMS (2013a). Frank, L., Gay, C., Meer, C., et al. (2017). The Little Schmidt Pediatric Hospital Fall Risk Assessment Index: A diagnostic accuracy study. International Journal Of Nursing Studies . 68:51-59. Retrieved from http://www.journalofnursingstudies.com/article/S0020-7489(16)30248-6/abstract Despite six decades of worldwide efforts that include publishing virtually hundreds of related epidemiological-type studies, there has been an increase (estimated to be 46% per 1000 patient days from 1954–6 to 2006–10) in the number of patient falls in hospitals and other health care facilities. These still occur most frequently near the bedside or in the bathroom, among mentally confused or physically impaired patients, and often involve those with greater comorbidity. The reasons that hospitals during the past half century have demonstrated a significant increase in patient falls per discharge or per patient days are numerous, are not completely surprising, and are certainly interrelated: improved accident reporting systems; on the average older, more impaired, more acutely ill, and more heavily sedated patients; and, less time spent by nursing personnel at the bedside. Most safety committees are not as effective as they should be, since they have difficulty in implementing a long-term, aggressive, facility-wide prevention program. Within that context, it may be worthwhile to discuss the advantages of nursing leadership rather than a representative of the facility’s management staff to chair these safety committees. Thomas, S., Mackintosh, S. (2016). Improvement of Physical Therapist Assessment of Risk of Falls in the Hospital and Discharge Handover Through an Intervention to Modify Clinical Behavior. Physical Therapy . 96(6):764-773. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/openview/44f19993c0fff12cc3dbd396d2ca6e89/1.pdf?pq-origsite=gscholar&cbl=40771 Beginning in FY2009, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) ended payment for care needed to treat certain preventable inpatient injuries that occur during hospitalization (e.g., fractures, dislocations, intracranial injuries) and often are caused by patient falls. In October 2014, CMS began reducing Medicare payments for hospitals scoring in the top quartile for rates of harmful conditions experienced by patients during hospitalization. This hospital-acquired conditions reduction program continued in FY2016 (Government Printing Office [GPO], 2013a; Medicare.gov, 2016). In 2011, the national average rate for injurious falls that occurred during hospitalization was 0.53 per 1,000 Medicare fee-for-service discharges in U.S. acute care hospitals (CMS, 2013a). Wong and associates (2011) concluded hospital stays of patient fallers with serious injury in the United States could be 6.3 days longer compared with patients who do not fall during hospital stays. Inpatient injurious falls continue to be the most prevalent of eight adverse conditions identified by CMS (2013a). Singh, I., Okeke, J., Edwards, C. (2015). Outcome of in-patient falls in hospitals with 100% single rooms and multi-bedded wards. Age & Ageing [serial online]. 44(6):1032-1035. Available from: CINAHL Complete, Ipswich, MA. Accessed March 14, 2017. To develop a tool for assessing vulnerability to falls in hospitalized elderly. Method: exploratory and descriptive study with a qualitative approach. It conducted an evaluation of the items that make up the Assessment Instrument for Falls in Elderly (AIFE) used in the Family Health Strategy, selecting those related to vulnerability to falls in hospitalized elderly, focusing on mobility dimension. Results: some functional assessment tools were adapted and/or added, which outlined the AIFE Hospital, presented through schematic and visual flowchart figures. In it, the mobility was subdivided into individual (identification, sense organs, musculoskeletal system, assessment activities of daily life; assessment of balance and gait, history of falls and fractures) and environmental (environmental scale of risk of falls). Conclusion: IRAQI Hospital assists in determining the individual profile and vulnerability of the elderly, for the prevention of falls, actions are scheduled. Assignment: Hospital Falls Research Get a 10 % discount on an order above $ 100 Use the following coupon code : NURSING10

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Assignment: Hospital Falls Research

Assignment: Hospital Falls Research ORDER NOW FOR CUSTOMIZED AND ORIGINAL ESSAY PAPERS ON Assignment: Hospital Falls Research Write a 500-750 word description of your proposed capstone project topic. Make sure to include the following: Assignment: Hospital Falls Research The problem, issue, suggestion, initiative, or educational need that will be the focus of the project The setting or context in which the problem, issue, suggestion, initiative, or educational need can be observed. A description providing a high level of detail regarding the problem, issue, suggestion, initiative, or educational need. Impact of the problem, issue, suggestion, initiative, or educational need on the work environment, the quality of care provided by staff, and patient outcomes. Significance of the problem, issue, suggestion, initiative, or educational need and its implications to nursing. A proposed solution to the identified project topic You are required to retrieve and assess a minimum of 8 peer-reviewed articles. Please use only the articles that I have attached for the purpose of this paper. I have also attached an old paper that you can use to reword for this current paper. Assignment: Hospital Falls Research validation_of_nursing_outcome_content_fall_prevention_behavior_in_a_hospital_environment.pdf using_and_developing_the_evidence_base_in_primary_care.pdf understanding_inpatient_injurious_fall_rates_using_medicare_s_h_ospital_compare_data.pdf the_little_schmidy_pediatric_hospital_f…ent_index__a_diagnostic_accuracy_study.pdf outcome_of_in_patient_falls_in_hospitals_with_100__single_rooms_and_multi_bedded_wards_.pdf picot_falls.docx Literature Review Grand Canyon University: NRS 433V March 19, 2017 Since the 1950’s there has been a drastic global expansion of medical advancements in technology and practice, however the number of patient falls in hospitals has increased, occurring most frequently the bedside or in the bathroom of the hospital. Some factors influencing the rise in falls include patients being more heavily sedated, an improvement in accident reporting, a larger and more impaired elderly population, but most importantly is the decreasing amount of time that nurses spend bedside with a patient. Studies have proven that the more time nurses spend with a patient, improving the individuation of his or her care, the less likely they are to fall. For the growing pool of hospital patients 65 and older, will the increased presence of nurses at a patient’s bedside, compared to those receiving the current nurse attention, experience less falls during their stay in the hospital in addition to a lesser degree of severity in said falls. Assignment: Hospital Falls Research Dr. Weil, T (2015) presents different factors influencing the rising incidents of patient falls backed by studies and research in his article “Patient Falls in Hospitals: An Increasing Problem”. Dr. Weil lists improved reporting systems of patient incidents as a cause in the overall number of patient falls increasing, stating that “falls and related injuries are the most frequently reported adverse event among adults in hospital settings”. It is clear that with better methods of reporting patient falls in the hospital, there will be more reports of said falls, however the degree of increase in reports display more than just an increase of reporting of increasing patient falls. This suggests that patient falls are more closely linked to variables such as amount of time a nurse spends bedside with the patient and a lesser degree of sedation of patients to the increasing number of patient falls during their hospital stay. The article quotes that the amount of benzodiazepines prescribed to patients has a direct correlation with the patient’s risk of falling, especially at night when the majority of in hospital falls occur. One solution for this problem is to simply prescribe less drugs to the patients so they’re more aware and alert, or increasing the amount of nurse supervision and attention a patient receives along with the increased amount of sedatives they are prescribed. In a study conducted by Daiani Moraes Oliveira, Karina Silveira de Almeida Hammerschmidt, Soraia Dornelles Schoeller, Juliana Balbinot Reis Girondi, Katia Cilene Godinho Bertoncello, and Newton Ferreira de Paula Junior (2016), qualitative data was used to determine the best tools to assess the rest of falls among patients. This study was conducted in Brazil in the year 2014 due to the growing elderly population in Brazil, which is expected to surpass the amount of children and adolescents by 2030. The objective of the study was to determine an assessment of the risk a patient has of falling, the factor most closely looked in deciding the degree of risk was the patient’s vulnerability. Researchers determined that nurses spending the most time with the patients of highest vulnerability to a fall was successful in reducing both the severity and occurrences of falls in hospitals. In the article “Understanding Inpatient Injurious Fall Rates Using Medicare’s Hospital Compare Data”, by Huey-Ming Tzeng, Hsou Mei Hu, and Chang-Yi Yin (2016), the quantitative data regarding patient falls in hospital care is examined. This study was designed to explore the relationship between total bedside time with a nurse a patient has received to their risk of falls. Data revealed that hospitals that ranked highest in staff attentiveness had the the lowest rate of patient fall incidents. Hospitals that had more individual care, such as more private rooms and more nurses per patient, showed to have a much lower rate of patient falls. On the other hand, hospitals with multiple people per room and nurses fulfilling more duties and therefore spending less time bedside with patients had the highest rates of patient falls while in hospital care in the study. This study concluded that hospitals with the highest patient satisfaction measures held the lowest rates of patient falls due to many factors, but most significantly the degree of attention each patient received from a nurse. Assignment: Hospital Falls Research Literature Review Practice Problem/Issue and PICOT Question For the growing pool of hospital patients 65 and older, will the increased presence of nurses at a patient’s bedside, compared to those receiving the current nurse attention, experience less falls during their stay in the hospital in addition to a lesser degree of severity in said falls. References Moraes, D., De Almeida, K., Dornelles, S., Reis Girondi, J., Godinho, K., de Paula, N. (2016). Assessment Instrument for falls among the hospitalized elderly (Hospital aide): Nurse analyzing vulnerability and mobility. Journal Of Nursing UFPE / Revista De Enfermagem UFPE. 10(11):4065-4074. Available from: CINAHL Complete, Ipswich, MA. Accessed March 14, 2017. To develop a tool for assessing vulnerability to falls in hospitalized elderly. Method: exploratory and descriptive study with a qualitative approach. It conducted an evaluation of the items that make up the Assessment Instrument for Falls in Elderly (AIFE) used in the Family Health Strategy, selecting those related to vulnerability to falls in hospitalized elderly, focusing on mobility dimension. Results: some functional assessment tools were adapted and/or added, which outlined the AIFE Hospital, presented through schematic and visual flowchart figures. In it, the mobility was subdivided into individual (identification, sense organs, musculoskeletal system, assessment activities of daily life; assessment of balance and gait, history of falls and fractures) and environmental (environmental scale of risk of falls). Conclusion: IRAQI Hospital assists in determining the individual profile and vulnerability of the elderly, for the prevention of falls, actions are scheduled. Descriptors: Aged; Accidental Falls; Hospitalization; Nursing. Weil, T. (2015). Feature Article: Patient falls in hospitals: An increasing problem. Geriatric Nursing . 36:342-347. Retrieved from http://www.gnjournal.com/article/S0197-4572(15)00287-6/abstract?cc=y= Despite six decades of worldwide efforts that include publishing virtually hundreds of related epidemiological-type studies, there has been an increase (estimated to be 46% per 1000 patient days from 1954–6 to 2006–10) in the number of patient falls in hospitals and other health care facilities. These still occur most frequently near the bedside or in the bathroom, among mentally confused or physically impaired patients, and often involve those with greater comorbidity. The reasons that hospitals during the past half century have demonstrated a significant increase in patient falls per discharge or per patient days are numerous, are not completely surprising, and are certainly interrelated: improved accident reporting systems; on the average older, more impaired, more acutely ill, and more heavily sedated patients; and, less time spent by nursing personnel at the bedside. Most safety committees are not as effective as they should be, since they have difficulty in implementing a long-term, aggressive, facility-wide prevention program. Within that context, it may be worthwhile to discuss the advantages of nursing leadership rather than a representative of the facility’s management staff to chair these safety committees. Huey-Ming, T. (2016). Understanding Inpatient Injurious Fall Rates Using Medicare’s Hospital Compare Data. MEDSURG Nursing . 25(4):255-269. Retrieved from https://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-461945696.html Beginning in FY2009, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) ended payment for care needed to treat certain preventable inpatient injuries that occur during hospitalization (e.g., fractures, dislocations, intracranial injuries) and often are caused by patient falls. In October 2014, CMS began reducing Medicare payments for hospitals scoring in the top quartile for rates of harmful conditions experienced by patients during hospitalization. This hospital-acquired conditions reduction program continued in FY2016 (Government Printing Office [GPO], 2013a; Medicare.gov, 2016). In 2011, the national average rate for injurious falls that occurred during hospitalization was 0.53 per 1,000 Medicare fee-for-service discharges in U.S. acute care hospitals (CMS, 2013a). Wong and associates (2011) concluded hospital stays of patient fallers with serious injury in the United States could be 6.3 days longer compared with patients who do not fall during hospital stays. Inpatient injurious falls continue to be the most prevalent of eight adverse conditions identified by CMS (2013a). Frank, L., Gay, C., Meer, C., et al. (2017). The Little Schmidt Pediatric Hospital Fall Risk Assessment Index: A diagnostic accuracy study. International Journal Of Nursing Studies . 68:51-59. Retrieved from http://www.journalofnursingstudies.com/article/S0020-7489(16)30248-6/abstract Despite six decades of worldwide efforts that include publishing virtually hundreds of related epidemiological-type studies, there has been an increase (estimated to be 46% per 1000 patient days from 1954–6 to 2006–10) in the number of patient falls in hospitals and other health care facilities. These still occur most frequently near the bedside or in the bathroom, among mentally confused or physically impaired patients, and often involve those with greater comorbidity. The reasons that hospitals during the past half century have demonstrated a significant increase in patient falls per discharge or per patient days are numerous, are not completely surprising, and are certainly interrelated: improved accident reporting systems; on the average older, more impaired, more acutely ill, and more heavily sedated patients; and, less time spent by nursing personnel at the bedside. Most safety committees are not as effective as they should be, since they have difficulty in implementing a long-term, aggressive, facility-wide prevention program. Within that context, it may be worthwhile to discuss the advantages of nursing leadership rather than a representative of the facility’s management staff to chair these safety committees. Thomas, S., Mackintosh, S. (2016). Improvement of Physical Therapist Assessment of Risk of Falls in the Hospital and Discharge Handover Through an Intervention to Modify Clinical Behavior. Physical Therapy . 96(6):764-773. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/openview/44f19993c0fff12cc3dbd396d2ca6e89/1.pdf?pq-origsite=gscholar&cbl=40771 Beginning in FY2009, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) ended payment for care needed to treat certain preventable inpatient injuries that occur during hospitalization (e.g., fractures, dislocations, intracranial injuries) and often are caused by patient falls. In October 2014, CMS began reducing Medicare payments for hospitals scoring in the top quartile for rates of harmful conditions experienced by patients during hospitalization. This hospital-acquired conditions reduction program continued in FY2016 (Government Printing Office [GPO], 2013a; Medicare.gov, 2016). In 2011, the national average rate for injurious falls that occurred during hospitalization was 0.53 per 1,000 Medicare fee-for-service discharges in U.S. acute care hospitals (CMS, 2013a). Wong and associates (2011) concluded hospital stays of patient fallers with serious injury in the United States could be 6.3 days longer compared with patients who do not fall during hospital stays. Inpatient injurious falls continue to be the most prevalent of eight adverse conditions identified by CMS (2013a). Singh, I., Okeke, J., Edwards, C. (2015). Outcome of in-patient falls in hospitals with 100% single rooms and multi-bedded wards. Age & Ageing [serial online]. 44(6):1032-1035. Available from: CINAHL Complete, Ipswich, MA. Accessed March 14, 2017. To develop a tool for assessing vulnerability to falls in hospitalized elderly. Method: exploratory and descriptive study with a qualitative approach. It conducted an evaluation of the items that make up the Assessment Instrument for Falls in Elderly (AIFE) used in the Family Health Strategy, selecting those related to vulnerability to falls in hospitalized elderly, focusing on mobility dimension. Results: some functional assessment tools were adapted and/or added, which outlined the AIFE Hospital, presented through schematic and visual flowchart figures. In it, the mobility was subdivided into individual (identification, sense organs, musculoskeletal system, assessment activities of daily life; assessment of balance and gait, history of falls and fractures) and environmental (environmental scale of risk of falls). Conclusion: IRAQI Hospital assists in determining the individual profile and vulnerability of the elderly, for the prevention of falls, actions are scheduled. Assignment: Hospital Falls Research Get a 10 % discount on an order above $ 100 Use the following coupon code : NURSING10

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