Assignment: Immunization Presentation

Assignment: Immunization Presentation
Assignment: Immunization Presentation
Directions For this Assignment you are creating a PowerPoint® presentation. Your presentation audience is the community. The topic is immunization/ vaccination. Information should include herd immunity, types of immunity related to vaccination, immunization effects on the individual, and community as well as worldwide effects of immunization. Additionally content should include vaccination trends, myths, disease statistics for those conditions prevented with vaccination, and pediatric vaccination schedule/s. Legal, ethical, and cultural considerations should be addressed. The presentation must have speaker notes per slide; 1–3 paragraphs. The PowerPoint should be developed in a professional design and style; succinct, not overly wordy, with a tasteful amount of elegant text and visual appeal, as well as accurate and complete content.Number of content slides are 12, not to exceed 14. Title slide and reference slide required and not included in the total. This presentation should adhere to appropriate 6th edition APA format. Number of content slides are 12, not to exceed 14. Title slide and reference slide required and not included in the total. This presentation should adhere to appropriate 6th edition APA format.
The first piece in this series looked at how hosts protect themselves from microbial invasion.
Certain infectious diseases are nevertheless common due to low efficiency against certain pathogens and pathogen evasion processes; some are occupationally related, with the risk to health care workers being especially well documented [1,2].
Because immunization can prevent certain occupationally transmitted illnesses, this article will investigate how different vaccine types regulate adaptive responses to provide further protection.
However, we must first analyze the phrases active and passive immunity.
Immune responses, both active and passive
The process of exposing the body to an antigen in order to produce an adaptive immune response takes days/weeks to mature, but the response can endure a long time—even a lifetime.
Natural and acquired immunity are the two types of active immunity.
Infection with the hepatitis A virus (HAV) in the wild, for example, triggers a natural active immune response that usually results in lifelong protection.
Similarly, administering two doses of hepatitis A vaccination results in an acquired active immune response that provides long-term (potentially permanent) protection. Because the hepatitis A vaccination has only been available since the late 1980s, follow-up studies of duration of protection have been limited to 25 years—hence the disclaimer concerning duration of protection mentioned earlier.
Passive immunity is the process of generating IgG antibodies to guard against infection; it provides instant, but temporary protection—a few weeks to three or four months at most.
Natural and acquired immunity are the two most common classifications for passive immunity.
The transfer of maternal tetanus antibody (mostly IgG) across the placenta offers natural passive protection to the newborn for several weeks/months until the antibody is destroyed and lost.
Acquired passive immunity, on the other hand, refers to the procedure of collecting serum from immune people, pooling it, concentrating the immunoglobulin fraction, and injecting it to protect a vulnerable person.
The following are the four most prevalent immunoglobulin preparations:
I Bio Products Laboratory: Human Hepatitis B Immunoglobulin Ph.Eur.* Human hepatitis B immunoglobulin is available in 200 and 500 IU vial sizes.
Every millilitre includes 10–100 mg/ml of human protein, with gammaglobulins accounting for at least 95% of the total (IgG).
This product is made with plasma from USA-sourced, pre-screened donors.
Hepatitis B antibody is not present in one millilitre.
It is used in the workplace to protect non-immune health care workers who are exposed to hepatitis B viruses immediately (together with an appropriate vaccination programme).
(ii) Bio Products Laboratory: Human Rabies Immunoglobulin Ph.Eur.*
The 500 IU vial size of human rabies immunoglobulin is available.
Each millilitre contains 40–180 mg/ml human protein, with gammaglobulins accounting for at least 95% of the total (IgG).
This product is made with plasma from USA-sourced, pre-screened donors.
The amount of rabies antibodies in a millilitre is not 150 IU.
It is given as part of post-exposure prophylaxis to non-immune people who have been exposed to rabies.
iii) Bio Products Laboratory: Human Tetanus Immunoglobulin Ph.Eur.*
A 250 IU vial of human tetanus immunoglobulin is available. Each millilitre contains 40–180 mg/ml human protein, with gammaglobulins accounting for at least 95% of the total (IgG). This product is made with plasma from vetted donors in the United States.
Tetanus antibody in one millilitre is not 100 IU.
This preparation is unlikely to be used by health-care providers; it is given as part of the management of tetanus-prone wounds with substantial soil/manure contamination and as part of the management of all wounds if the individual is suspected of being non-immune.
(iv) Bio Products Laboratory: Human Varicella-Zoster Immunoglobulin Ph.Eur.*
Each vial contains 250 mg protein (40–180 mg/ml), with gammaglobulins accounting for at least 95% of the total (IgG). This product is made with plasma from vetted donors in the United States.
A millilitre of Varicella-Zoster antibody does not contain 100 IU.
It is administered to non-immune people who have been exposed to chickenpox as part of their post-exposure prophylaxis.

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