Contributions of Nursing Informatics Pioneers

Contributions of Nursing Informatics Pioneers ORDER NOW FOR CUSTOMIZED AND ORIGINAL ESSAY PAPERS ON Contributions of Nursing Informatics Pioneers One of the major drivers in recent health care reform legislation is the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act’s (ARRA) HiTech Incentive. Contributions of Nursing Informatics Pioneers. This act, passed in 2009, earmarked $22 billion for the adoption of electronic health records (EHRs), with a goal of 100% adoption in all practice settings by the year 2014. The HiTech Act provides an example of the pivotal role that health information technology plays in the delivery of quality health care services. Yet, health information technology is a relatively new field. This Application Assignment provides an opportunity for you to examine the contributions of pioneers in this arena and consider how their contributions have influenced health informatics and nursing practice today. To prepare: ? Visit the AMIA Video Library 1: Nursing Informatics Pioneers webpage listed in the Learning Resources. ? Review the biographies and video presentations of pioneers who are of interest to you, or may hold a position that you aspire to achieve. ? Select two nursing informatics pioneers and conduct further research on their contributions. ? Consider how their contributions have influenced health information technology and nursing practice today. By Day 7 of Week 2 Write a scholarly 3- to 4-page paper comparing two nursing informatics pioneers. Synthesize your thoughts using the bullets below as a guide: ? What are the professional accomplishments of each individual? ? How have their contributions influenced nursing practice? ? How have their contributions shaped the field of nursing informatics? ? What lessons can you take away from their experiences? ? What skills or ideas demonstrated by these leaders might you apply to your professional practice? attachment_1 attachment_2 attachment_3 attachment_4 attachment_5 • • • • • • • • • One of the major drivers in recent health care reform legislation is the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act’s (ARRA) HiTech Incentive. This act, passed in 2009, earmarked $22 billion for the adoption of electronic health records (EHRs), with a goal of 100% adoption in all practice settings by the year 2014. The HiTech Act provides an example of the pivotal role that health information technology plays in the delivery of quality health care services. Yet, health information technology is a relatively new field. This Application Assignment provides an opportunity for you to examine the contributions of pioneers in this arena and consider how their contributions have influenced health informatics and nursing practice today. To prepare: Visit the AMIA Video Library 1: Nursing Informatics Pioneers webpage listed in the Learning Resources. Review the biographies and video presentations of pioneers who are of interest to you, or may hold a position that you aspire to achieve. Select two nursing informatics pioneers and conduct further research on their contributions. Consider how their contributions have influenced health information technology and nursing practice today. By Day 7 of Week 2 Write a scholarly 3- to 4-page paper comparing two nursing informatics pioneers. Synthesize your thoughts using the bullets below as a guide: What are the professional accomplishments of each individual? How have their contributions influenced nursing practice? How have their contributions shaped the field of nursing informatics? What lessons can you take away from their experiences? What skills or ideas demonstrated by these leaders might you apply to your professional practice? Grading Criteria Document: Week 2 Application 1 Rubric (Word document) Video Library 1: Nursing Informatics Pioneers Patricia Abbott PhD, RN, FAAN, FACMI Dr. Abbott is best known for her early work in helping to establish the Nursing Informatics Specialty. She was a member of the Author team for the original Scope and Standards of NI Practice with the ANA, and then her work.. Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Ida M. Androwich PhD, RNC, FAAN Dr. Androwich is a Professor of Nursing at Loyola University Chicago teaching graduate courses in Health Care Informatics, Systems, and PopulationBased…Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Jean M. Arnold, EdD, RN Dr. Arnold is Professor Emerita in nursing informatics, Rutgers University College of Nursing with a doctoral degree from Teachers College, Columbia University …Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Suzanne Bakken DNSc, RN, FAAN, FACMI Suzanne Bakken, RN, DNSc, FAAN, is Alumni Professor of Nursing and Professor of Biomedical Informatics at Columbia University …Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Marion Ball, EdD Dr. Ball’s career started in 1965 at the University of Kentucky, she worked on computerizing a clinical lab system. She also promoted and supported numerous activities…Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Patty Brennan PhD, RN, FAAN, FACMI Dr. Patricia Flatley Brennan is the Lillian L. Moehlman Bascom Professor, School of Nursing and College of Engineering, University of WisconsinMadison. She developed…Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Pat Button, EdD, RN Dr. Button is Chief Nursing Officer for Zynx Health, where she is responsible for the ZynxCare™ product that provides customizable evidence based interdisciplinary…Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Betty L. Chang DNSc, RN, FNP-C, FAAN Dr. Betty L. Chang’s major contributions in informatics have been in the area of Nursing Education and Research. She began in the early 1980’s by designing..Contributions of Nursing Informatics Pioneers .Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Connie Delaney PhD, RN, FAAN, FACMI Connie White Delaney is Dean & Professor, School of Nursing, The University of Minnesota where she also holds an informatics appointment in the School of Medicine…Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Carole A. Gassert PhD, RN, FACMI, FAAN Alliance for Nursing Informatics (ANI) announces the appointment of Carole A. Gassert…Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Susan J. Grobe, PhD, RN Dr. Grobe is known for her contributions …Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Rosemary Kennedy, MBA, RN Rosemary Kennedy is the Chief Nursing Informatics Officer for Siemens Medical Solutions. In this role, she provides professional practice leadership…Read more View her video Listen to audio Read transcript of the interview Debra Konicek RN, MSN, BC Managing Director of the College of American Pathologists’ (CAP) Professional Services division, is responsible for …Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Norma Lang, PhD, RN, FAAN Norma M. Lang is the Howe Endowed Chair for Healthcare Transformation, University of WisconsinMilwaukee College of Nursing and Aurora Health Care …Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Karen S. Martin, RN, MSN, FAAN Karen is a health care consultant. She participated in early Omaha System research and development …Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Susan Matney, MSN, RN Susan has worked as a nurse since 1981 and began her career in informatics in 1997. She has been involved in the creation and implementation of the…Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Kathleen A. Mcormick PhD, RN, FAAN, FACMI Dr. McCormick is Senior Principal Scientist/Vice President, SAIC-Frederick in Rockville, Md …Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Judy Murphy RN, FACMI, FHIMSS For over 25 years Judy Murphy has been a leader and pioneer in the nursing informatics community …Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Susan K. Newbold PhD, RN-BC, FAAN, FHIMSS Dr. Newbold is a Healthcare Informatics Consultant based in Franklin, TN. She founded CARING …Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Judy G. Ozbolt PhD, RN, FAAN, FACMI, FAIMBE Judy Ozbolt received her BSN from Duke University in 1967. Following Peace Corps assignments in Turkey and Liberia, she earned an MS and a PhD …Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Carol Romano RN, BC, CNAA, FAAN Rear Admiral Romano is the Acting Chief of Staff for the Office of the Surgeon General and Chief Nurse Officer for the Public…Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Virginia K. Saba Dr. Saba, a nationally and internationally known pioneer of computer technology in nursing has for over 40 years …Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Patricia M. Schwirian, Phd, RN Dr. Schwirian is Professor Emerita, The Ohio State University College of Nursing & Department of Family Medicine…Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Joyce E. Sensmeier RN, MS, RN-BC, CPHIMS, FHIMSS Joyce Sensmeier MS, RN-BC, CPHIMS, FHIMSS, FAAN began her career in Nursing Informatics at Palos Community Hospital …Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Roy L. Simpson, RN, C, FNAP, FAAN Roy L. Simpson, RN, C, CMAC, FNAP, FAAN, is vice president, nursing informatics, at Cerner Corporation. Contributions of Nursing Informatics Pioneers He is responsible for strategic sales/planning the patient…Read more View his video Read transcript of the interview Diane J. Skiba, PhD, FACMI, FAAN Dr. Diane J. Skiba is Professor and Coordinator of Healthcare Informatics at the University of Colorado Denver. Since 1980, she has dedicated …Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Nancy Staggers Dr. Nancy Staggers has an extensive background in clinical informatics, from determining user requirements to application prototyping, system selection, large systems …Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Marianne Tallberg View her video Linda Q. Thede PhD, RN, C Dr. Thede is Professor Emeritus from the College of Nursing at Kent State University where she participated in numerous university committees studying and implementing …Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview James P. Turley, PhD, RN Dr. Turley is Associate Professor at the School of Health Information Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston…Read more View his video Read transcript of the interview Judith J. Warren PhD, RN, FAAN, FACMI Judith J. Warren, PhD, RN, BC, FAAN, FACMI is the Christine A. Hartley Centennial Professor at the University of Kansas School of Nursing …Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Charlotte Weaver, RN, PhD Dr. Weaver is Senior Vice President and Chief Clinical Officer for Gentiva Health Services, Atlanta, GA. Formerly, she held executive positions …Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Elizabeth E. Weiner PhD, RN-BC, FAAN Betsy Weiner, PhD, RN-BC, FACMI, FAAN, is the Senior Associate Dean for Informatics at the Vanderbilt University School of Nursing …Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Rita Zielstorff RN, MS, FAAN,FACMI Rita D. Zielstorff is an internationally recognized expert in clinical information systems. She began her informatics career in 1971 at the Laboratory …Read more View her video Read transcript of the interview Health Informatics E.J.S. Hovenga et al. (Eds.) IOS Press, 2010 © 2010 The authors and IOS Press. All rights reserved. doi:10.3233/978-1-60750-476-4-9 9 2. Health Informatics – An Introduction Evelyn.J.S.HOVENGA1, RN, PhD (UNSW), FACHI, FACSa, Michael R KIDD, MBBS, MD, DCCH, DipRACOG, FRACGP, FACHI, FAFPM (Hon), FHKCFP (Hon), FRNZCGP (Hon), MAICDb, Sebastian GARDE Dr. sc. hum., Dipl.-Inform. Med., FACHIc, Carola HULLIN LUCAY COSSIO RN, BN, Hons, PhD (Melb.Uni)d a Director, eHealth Education, Consultant, openEHR Foundation, and Honorary Senior Research Associate, Centre for Health Informatics & Multiprofessional Education, University College London, Honorary Academic Fellow, Austin Health, Melbourne, Adjunct Professor, Central Queensland University Rockhampton, Queensland, and Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia b Executive Dean, Faculty of Health Sciences, Flinders University, Australia c Senior Developer, Ocean Informatics, Düsseldorf, Germany d Co-Founder eHealth Systems, Santiago, Chile, Melbourne, Australia Abstract. This chapter gives an educational overview of: • the scope of the health informatics discipline • health informatics and e-health definitions • health informatics professional networks • potential benefits of applying health informatics technologies Keywords. Medical Informatics, Information Systems, Health, Computer Systems, Knowledge Introduction Health Informatics is a highly interdisciplinary field that may be defined as “an evolving scientific discipline that deals with the collection, storage, retrieval, communication and optimal use of health related data, information and knowledge. The discipline utilises the methods and technologies of the information sciences for the purposes of problem solving, decision making and assuring highest quality health care in all basic and applied areas of the biomedical sciences” [1]. Contributions of Nursing Informatics Pioneers 1. eHealth The term e-health only came into widespread usage a few years ago at the turn of the century. It was preceded by telemedicine, teleradiology or telehealth. As this became more common place most people realised that telemedicine or telehealth was simply 1 Corresponding Author: [email protected] 10 E.J.S. Hovenga et al. / Health Informatics – An Introduction about the delivery of health care via the use of telecommunications. With rapid advances and the convergence of these technologies with information technologies these terms became obsolete. There is no agreed definition for e-health, yet this term is widely used by many. Oh et al. [2] undertook a systematic review of 1209 abstracts and 430 citations and found 10 different definitions for the term eHealth, and from a Google search an additional 41 unique definitions were located ranging in length from 3 to 74 words. The most common universal themes were health and technology. In addition 6 less frequently mentioned themes emerged: commerce, stakeholders, outcomes, place and perspectives. The word Internet was mentioned in 27 of the 51 definitions and only one definition included the term integration. The adoption of technologies to better manage health information and communication within a nation’s health industry enables significant productivity and efficiency improvements to be achieved. It enables the provision of a more effective and efficient health workforce who are thus enabled to provide higher quality, safer and more accessible care in multiple locations producing better health outcomes. The adoption of health informatics or e-health is simply a requirement of doing business in 21st century healthcare [3]. This requires educational organizations to build the necessary workforce capacity so that these technologies can be developed, implemented and used optimally. 2. Health Informatics Discipline The discipline of health informatics has arisen from the earlier established science of medical informatics [4] [5] [6]. The field of health informatics is very extensive. For example at the twelfth’s world congress on medical informatics held in Brisbane in 2007, Australia close to 300 papers and as many posters were presented and classified into any one of 71 different topics covering all aspects of the technology and many different applications by a vast array of health professionals in all types of health care related settings, including clinical, management, administrative, policy and research based in community and institutional settings. It is noted that the first world congress on medical informatics was held in 1974 in Stockholm, Sweden . Although the two disciplines share many concepts, and the terms are often interchangeable, in this textbook we have chosen to focus on the use of information technology in all areas of health care, rather than just focus on the delivery of medical services by medical practitioners. The term health informatics is all embracing and medical informatics could be viewed as a subset of health informatics along with nursing or dental informatics. Many countries have established a health informatics group, society or association. Such organizations then choose to become a member of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) and this organization hosts international conferences together with the local national member organization to promote the discipline, enable international networking to take place and to share experiences. IMIA has set about to define the health informatics discipline via its scientific map and the educational recommendations. Both are IMIA endorsed documents available from www.imia.org although they are both in the process of being updated[7]. The current scientific map has seven categories as detailed in Table 1: 11 E.J.S. Hovenga et al. / Health Informatics – An Introduction Table 1 IMIA Scientific Map Categories Applied Technology Information Applications DataHumanEducation Technology and Products Infrastructure Organizational and Infrastructure Related Knowledge Clinical Disciplines These original IMIA Scientific Map categories have been extended to fourteen organizing concepts or categories in the latest draft, these are presented in the Table 2. Table 2– IMIA’s 2008 Draft Organizing Concepts of the Health Informatics Discipline 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. ICT (Computer Science) for Health Health & Social Care processes Health (Care) Records Health & Social Care industry Health Informatics Standards Knowledge Domains & Knowledge Discovery Legal & Ethical 8. People in Organisations 9. Politics & Policy 10. Contributions of Nursing Informatics Pioneers Technologies for Health 11. Terminology, Classification & Grouping 12. Uses of Clinical Information 13. Using Informatics to Support Clinical 14. Computer Systems Applications in Health (Toolkit) Numerous concepts fit within each category ranging from around 20 to more than 60 indicating the enormous scope of this discipline. This clearly demonstrates not only the scope of the Health Informatics discipline but also the needs from a healthcare system perspective. The discipline is very broad, has lots of depth and may be classified into computing (incl. all information and communications technologies) or health (incl. healthy living, population health, health service delivery, health policy) problem spaces. This means that no health informatician has the same set of knowledge and skills as another, each tends to focus on their own strengths and areas of interests in either problem space although all need to possess a basic set of competencies. The figures below show the key differences for each problem space [8]. The shaded portion in Figure 1 represents Health Informatics in the problem space of computing. Health Informaticians need knowledge/skills throughout the spectrum in the computing space, from some practical knowledge in Computer Hardware and Architecture to a profound theoretical understanding as well as application skills on the organisational and information systems layer. Figure 1: The Overall Place of Health Informatics in the Problem Space of Computing 12 E.J.S. Hovenga et al. / Health Informatics – An Introduction The Health problem space is complex. For example, sharing electronic health records is a more complex task than sharing financial information or travel bookings. There are lots of different types of information; progress notes, appointments, documents, collections of images, laboratory results, registries etc. The variety of information is obvious in the paper world where there are hundreds or thousands of different forms in just one hospital, putting at risk people receiving healthcare services. Health care is constantly changing in three ways (breadth, depth, complexity): new information, information in finer-grained detail, and new relationships are always being discovered or becoming relevant complicating this space further. Therefore – more than in other computing discipline – in addition to an understanding of content in the computing problem space, an understanding of the health problem space content is fundamental for Health Informaticians. The shaded portion in Figure 2 represents Health Informatics in the health problem space which is essentially the reverse of the depth of skills and knowledge required from the computing space. Figure 2 The Overall Place of Health Informatics in the Health Problem Space Every health informatics project requires a team of people who collectively contribute the necessary set of skills and knowledge to that project, thus teamwork and the ability to work collaboratively with others are skills every health informatician requires. The difference between information systems specialists and health information systems specialists is that the latter place a greater emphasis on the application of the technology/systems in health care. They focus on solving very complex medical or health related problems using the information technology to the fullest extent as the tool to achieve that. This often means the need for a change in work practices. 3. Potential Benefits of Applying ICT in the Health Industry The application of cutting edge technologies pertaining to the computer, communication and information sciences has much to offer the health sciences. We are E.J.S. Hovenga et al. / Health Informatics – An Introduction 13 of the view that appropriate use of these technologies will result in improved health, lower costs and improved service delivery methods [9]. 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