Discussion: Power point related to public health operations in the US

Discussion: Power point related to public health operations in the US ORDER NOW FOR CUSTOMIZED AND ORIGINAL ESSAY PAPERS ON Discussion: Power point related to public health operations in the US Please read the following articles below, then do a ppt (8-10 slides, not more than 10 slides) about the question below: Discuss the differences between MaHIM and the public health Incident Command System (ICS). Please discuss the differences with regards to operation sector (because the presentation is about those differences related to operations in public health). Discussion: Power point related to public health operations in the US Important notes: 1- Please just put clear points in each slide (with pictures if possible) and a paragraph as a description for each slide in the comments (of each slide) below. Consider yourself the presenter of this ppt, you will not put long sentences in the slides, and you will put description (that include very simple words) below each slide in the comments to help you read and smoothly do the presentation. 2- Use APA format for citation mahim_poster.pdf mahim__1_.pdf public_health_ics_2005.pdf Incident Management System Monitoring A Comprehensive Functional System Description for Mass Casualty Medical and Health Incident Management • Joseph A. Barbera, M.D. Co-Director, Institute for Crisis, Disaster, and Risk Management The George Washington University Jurisdiction A Liaison Media Message REGIONAL MANAGEMENT COORDINATION FUNCTION Jurisdiction B Safety Public Information Tracking (rumor control, etc.) • Anthony G. Macintyre, M.D. The George Washington University COMMUNITY MEDICAL and HEALTH INCIDENT MANAGEMENT Functional Area Public Information (media/public affairs) COMMUNITY A EMERGENCY OPERATION CENTER Support Functions COMMUNITY MEDICAL and HEALTH Incident Management Functional Area STATE and FEDERAL ASSISTANCE to COMMUNITY A COMMUNITY B EMERGENCY OPERATION CENTER Support Functions STATE and FEDERAL ASSISTANCE to COMMUNITY B Supported By The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation MEDICAL and HEALTH OPERATIONS FUNCTIONAL AREA Incident Epidemiological Profiling Community Health Surveillance Patient Surveillance & Tracking Rapid Epidemiological Investigation Anomaly Confirmation Incident Diagnostics Pre-Hospital Care Emergency Medical Services Acute Medical Care Mental Health Population Mental Health Interventions Victim Extraction/ Casualty Collection Non Hospital-Based Care Victim Mental Health Interventions Victim Triage Emergency & Hospitalized Care Victims’ Family Assistance Services Victim Treatment Response Resource On-Scene Staging Patient Distribution Clinical Laboratory Diagnostics Medical Care Operational Medicine Environment Lab & “Field” Diagnostics Criminal Investigation Diagnostics Animal Surveillance Environmental Surveillance Post-Acute Medical Care Patient Diagnostics Medical Evacuation/ Inter-Facility Transport MEDICAL and HEALTH MEDICAL and HEALTH SUPPORT MEDICAL and HEALTH SUPPORT Operations Staging LOGISTICS FUNCTIONAL AREA PLANNING FUNCTIONAL AREA Hazard/Threat/ Disease Containment Public Health Population Based Interventions Mass (or Targeted) Prophylaxis/Immunization Body Recovery/Handling (pre-morgue) Mortuary Services (identification, pathology/ autopsy, forensics) Isolation (all types) General Emergency Response (Operations related to medical activities) Fire Suppression Scene Security/ Perimeter Control Search & Rescue Evacuation Strategies Public Warning/Alerts & Public Education Victim Decontamination Environmental Based Interventions Environmental Decontamination & Cleanup of Hazard Food, Water, & Sanitary Inspection Animal & Vector Control Waste Disposal Decedents’ Family Assistance Services Technical Support Communications Post-Morgue Services Hazard Site “Hot Zone” Security Version 2.0 12/02 Copyrighted Material. All Rights Reserved. Mass Fatality Care Traffic Control Hazardous Materials Response Law Enforcement Specialized Equipment Maintenance & Repair Technical Evaluations of Hazard Impact on Response Capabilities Transportation Support Personnel Transport Supplies & Equipment Transport Supplies & Equipment Support Acquisition & Maintenance Personnel Processing Support Solicited Volunteer Processing Pharmaceuticals/ Vaccines Registration & Badging “Sterile” Supplies Credentialing Medical Equipment Blood Products General Supplies Unsolicited Volunteer Processing Registration & ID/ Skills Verification Assignment Equipment Decontamination Rehabilitation & Return Personnel Support Personnel Feeding & Billeting Personnel Medical Care Acute Care (medical & psychological) Post-Acute Care (medical & psychological) Preventive Medicine Information Processing (MH-LIF) Information Collection, Analysis, Formatting & Reporting Community Health Surveillance Data Processing Patient Surveillance & Tracking (PSAT) Data Processing Boundary Function Information Processing Resource Status Tracking Physical Health & Hygiene Mental Health Mass Evacuation Responder Rehabilitation Public Works & Engineering Personnel Health Surveillance (incident & post-incident) Personnel Family Assistance Functional Area Report Tracking Plans Development & Assessment (Action Planning) Event Epidemiological Projection MEDICAL and HEALTH SUPPORT MEDICAL and HEALTH OPERATIONS FUNCTIONAL AREA ADMINISTRATION & FINANCE FUNCTIONAL AREA Finance Support Resource/Equipment Claims Tracking Regulatory Compliance Liability Measuring Effectiveness Financial Reports & Record Keeping Licensure/Certification Alternate & Long-Range Strategy Planning Vendor Contracting Medication & Medical Device Regulatory Facilitation Contingency Planning Mutual Aid Financial Remuneration Demobilization Planning Personnel Compensation Briefing Support Personnel Claims Processing & Tracking Hazard-Related Expert Information Document Control & Archiving Information Systems Administration Information Systems Design & Application Information Systems Support . Discussion: Power point related to public health operations in the US This System Description outlines the functions (and their relationships) necessary for adequate mass casualty medical incident management. It is not an organizational chart. For further details see Medical and Health Incident Management (MaHIM) System Final Report December 2002. Available at www.seas.gwu.edu/~icdm LOGISTICS FUNCTIONAL AREA PLANNING FUNCTIONAL AREA MANAGEMENT BY REACTION ADMINISTRATION & FINANCE FUNCTIONAL AREA (Proactive) Response Phase (Reactive) Business Loss Recovery Administration Response Phase Operational Recovery Certification Business & Data Systems Crisis Administration MEDICAL and HEALTH SUPPORT MANAGEMENT BY OBJECTIVES Incident Notification Recognized First Response & initial assessment Tactical Management addresses immediate needs Transitional MANAGEMENT MEETING establishes Incident Manager (IM) & possibly Unified Management (UM) 1 ACTION PLAN (AP): A written description of the incident 2 INFORMATION PROCESSING: • Community health surveillance • Patient tracking • Resource status • Boundary functions information • Expert information • Functional area reports Assess progress utilizing measures of effectiveness 3 SUPPORTIVE PLANS: • • • • • Health & Safety Plan Event Epidemiological Projection Alternative Strategies Contingency & Long-Range Planning Demobilization Planning IM/UMsets overall incident objectives & priorities MANAGEMENT MEETING evaluates & revises incident objectives objectives, strategies, tactics, and supporting plans for a specific operational period. Equipment Certification Responder Certification for Specialized Equipment MEDICAL and HEALTH SUPPORT Healthcare Infrastructure Business Continuity (Admin. & Finance) Healthcare Facility Regulations Coordination Public Health Legal Interpretation MEDICAL and HEALTH SUPPORT The Planning Cycle PLANNING MEETING develops incident strategy & tactics to accomplish the incident objectives Information processing2 & Supportive Plans 3 development Action Plan (AP)1 preparation & approval Beginning of Operational Period OPERATIONS BRIEFING briefs the operational leaders on the AP Execute AP & initiate planning for the next Operational Period Figure adapted from: Planning Cycle, U.S. Coast Guard Incident Management Handbook, U.S. Coast Guard COMDTPUB P3120.17 April 2001 Medical and Health Incident Management (MaHIM) System Final Report – December 2002 A Comprehensive Functional System Description for Mass Casualty Medical and Health Incident Management Joseph A. Barbera, M.D. Co-Director, The George Washington University, Institute for Crisis, Disaster, and Risk Management Anthony G. Macintyre, M.D. The George Washington University Supported by The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Medical and Health Incident Management (MaHIM) System: A Comprehensive Functional System Description for Mass Casualty Medical and Health Incident Management Joseph A. Barbera, M.D. Co-Director, The George Washington University, Institute for Crisis, Disaster, and Risk Management Anthony G. Macintyre, M.D. The George Washington University This document may be referenced using the following: Barbera J.A., Macintyre A.G. Medical and Health Incident Management (MaHIM) System: A Comprehensive Functional System Description for Mass Casualty Medical and Health Incident Management. Institute for Crisis, Disaster, and Risk Management, The George Washington University. Washington, D.C., October 2002. Supported by a grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. Copyright 2002, Institute for Crisis, Disaster, and Risk Management The George Washington University Graphic Design: Ann Kollegger Design • Proofreading: Marjorie Weber (TQM — Total Quality Management) Table of Contents Preface Preface Chapter 1 Executive Summary Chapter 2 Introduction and Background Chapter 3 Project Methodology: Objectives, Assumptions, and Description of the Process Chapter 4 MaHIM: Objectives and Assumptions Chapter 5 MaHIM: Functional System Description Overview Chapter 6 MaHIM: Medical and Health Incident Management Functional Area Chapter 7 MaHIM: Medical and Health Operations Functional Area Chapter 8 MaHIM: Medical and Health Support Functional Areas Chapter 9 MaHIM: Concept of Operations Chapter 10 Project Findings and Conclusions Appendix A Document Research List Appendix B Project Work Plan and Task Completion Schedule Appendix C MaHIM Peer Review Group Appendix D Acronyms Preface Project Goal This project was designed to develop a peer-reviewed, requirements-based operational model for mass casualty response, based upon medical, public health, and emergency management science.Discussion: Power point related to public health operations in the US The model provides a single, comprehensive system description of the functional components critical to effective response for any mass casualty incident. It describes the functions according to management system constructs, delineating the critical relationships between functions, both within the system and with important nonmedical emergency response functions such as law enforcement and fire services. It also describes the system processes that coordinate these many component functions to work toward a common goal: the limitation of morbidity (injury or illness) and mortality (deaths) in a population exposed to a major hazard. While the model is qualified as being for “mass casualties” it is intended to be interpreted into daily operations. The development process for the model was based upon several core themes: • An all-hazards approach (natural, technological, and human induced) that is applicable to planning for all mass casualty incidents. • A peer-review methodology from a range of experts to promote multidisciplinary acceptance and application of the model to diverse geographic regions. • A focus on the central issues of incident management organization, information management, communication connectivity, medical surveillance, medical patient care capacity, and patient specialty care. This is not an attempt to define the innumerable and rapidly evolving technical requirements (“how to do it”), but rather it describes the functional requirements (“what needs to be done”) of a comprehensive system. The term “system” in this project means a clearly described functional structure, including defined processes, that coordinates otherwise diverse parts to achieve a common goal. “development process assumptions”) and provides a functional description of the model developed in the project: the Medical and Health Incident Management (MaHIM) System. Incident management and response components are designated by the term “function.” A description of each of the functions and sub-functions and how they primarily relate within the MaHIM System is provided in Chapters 5-8. A Concept of Operations (Chapter 9) assists the reader in understanding how management processes coordinate the functions to operate as a comprehensive system. It must be emphasized that this is not an “organizational” model. To use the model as a planning tool, readers should determine which organizations within their jurisdiction are responsible for each of the described functions, sub-functions, and processes. Delineating these findings in the MaHIM layout then provides a customized organizational model for that individual jurisdiction. The model is intended to be a primarily formative rather than an evaluative tool. In other words, this model is designed to assist a region or jurisdiction in developing an optimally effective mass casualty capability. It is not intended to be used as a pass/fail grading method for current systems and personnel. Because of the ever-increasing importance and prevalence of the Metropolitan Medical Response System (MMRS)** across the United States, this model has been designed to meet or exceed the requirements of the MMRS contracts. It may therefore be a useful tool for the communities involved with the MMRS program. The authors are indebted to Greg Shaw, Lissa Westerman, and John R. Harrald, Ph.D., for their research, administrative, and editing support in this project. The authors would also like to express their appreciation to the experts who participated so fully in the project review process (a list of participating reviewers is found in Appendix C). Their comments and suggestions helped greatly to improve the accuracy and focus of this project and the final model. For the purposes of this project, the term “mass casualties” is defined using Secretary of HHS Tommy Thompson’s definition of greater than 500 casualties.* How To Use This Document This document provides a broad overview of the breadth and complexity of mass casualty medical incident response. The document moves through a description of the background information and science upon which this project is based (the * 31 January 02 Letter from Secretary of Health and Human Services Tommy Thompson to state governors, copy distributed to the American Hospital Association, Enclosure 2: Critical Benchmarks for Bioterrorism Preparedness Planning: “7. Discussion: Power point related to public health operations in the US Develop a time line for implementation of regional hospital Plans that would accommodate in an emergency at least 500 patients.” “Casualty” refers to any human accessing health or medical services, including mental health services and fatality care, as a result of a hazard impact. Joseph A. Barbera, M.D. Anthony G. Macintyre, M.D. ** The Metropolitan Medical Response System is a program under the Office of Emergency Response of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services that provides preparedness funds for communities to improve health and medical capabilities for mass casualty incidents. More information is available at: http://ndms.dhhs.gov/index.html. 1-1 Mass Casualty Medical and Health Incident Management The Institute for Crisis, Disaster, and Risk Management The George Washington University, FINAL REPORT 12/02 Executive Summary Introduction The attacks of September 11th, followed shortly by the anthrax dissemination event in Florida, the National Capital Region (NCR), and the New York metropolitan area, have confirmed that the United States faces a true threat of intentional mass casualty* incidents caused by terrorism. These events of 2001, coupled with the results of recent exercises (TOPOFF 2000, Dark Winter, and others), have also demonstrated that as a system, U.S. medical response is not adequately prepared, resourced, or organized to deal with mass casualty incidents, particularly those resulting from bioterrorism. There are no mass casualty response standards that organize all health and medical responses within a jurisdiction. With few exceptions, federal and state preparedness programs have not placed visible priority on establishing comprehensive medical and health emergency management systems, and no comprehensive, published system model exists. Furthermore, the effects of this poor coordination are exacerbated by the negative impact of adverse medical economic and political decisions on the surge and specialty capabilities of individual medical assets. Examination of medical response to mass casualty events in the United States reveals several recurring concepts: • The initial response to any event will be almost entirely based upon locally available health and medical organizations. • The response to a mass casualty incident impacts an entire community and involves numerous diverse medical and public health entities, including healthcare facilities, public health departments, emergency medical services, medical laboratories, and individual healthcare practitioners. • Healthcare facilities have traditionally planned and responded to emergencies as individual entities, not as part of a larger system. • Public health departments are not traditionally integrated with emergency response operations, including the acute care medical and mental health communities.Discussion: Power point related to public health operations in the US 1 Rather than recognizing and addressing these recurring, large-scale issues, the current approach to mass casualty incident preparedness is primarily focused upon individual problems that were experienced during the events of 2001, or are anticipated in future mass casualty incidents. Disease surveillance, patient tracking, rapid laboratory diagnostics, and many other identified issues are being addressed individually in an effort to achieve adequate preparedness for future mass casualty events. Careful examination of these issues suggests that they must be solved through processes that involve many diverse organizations, and this can only be accomplished through comprehensive management. To address these deficiencies in a rapid, effective, and community-wide manner, a well-defined and developed mass casualty response system must first be established. The MaHIM System project was undertaken to address this critical management deficiency. The goal is to reduce future morbidity and mortality in mass casualty incidents and other emergencies by providing a model system, adaptable to any individual community, that promotes optimal medical management and response operations. MaHIM describes an overarching system for organizing and managing the many diverse medical and public health entities involved in mass casualty response. The product of this study is a requirements-based, planning framework derived from a functional analysis of mass casualty care. The model provides a systematic approach for a community (defined as an individual jurisdiction) to use in developing its own medical response capability. In a sense, it can be viewed as a “tool-kit” that provides assistance with everything from broad-based management strategies to more discrete, actionable items such as the requirements for processing unsolicited volunteers during a response. Though the entire system description may initially appear quite complex, the overriding management principles are straightforward and relevant to all communities, from the smallest to the largest and most diverse. Some portions of the project are stand-alone, in that a community can use * “Casualty” refers to any human accessing health or medical services, including mental health services and fatality care, as a result of a hazard impact. Joseph A. Barbera, M.D. Anthony G. Macintyre, M.D. 1-3 Mass Casualty Medical and Health Incident Management The Institute for Crisis, Disaster, and Risk Management The George Washington University, FINAL REPORT 12/02 1 Executive Summary Incident Command System INCIDENT COMMAND Operations Sector Logistics Sector Plans Sector Finance Sector Figure 1-1 these specific components to focus on the narrower management challenges within a mass casualty emergency. MaHIM also provides a framework for interjurisdictional, regional cooperation during a large-scale response. The model is based upon established medical, public health, and emergency management science and best practice, including concepts from the Incident Command (Management) System. 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