Discussion: Utilization of the Betty Neuman Health Care Systems Model

Discussion: Utilization of the Betty Neuman Health Care Systems Model ORDER NOW FOR CUSTOMIZED AND ORIGINAL ESSAY PAPERS ON Discussion: Utilization of the Betty Neuman Health Care Systems Model For this assignment develop a scholarly paper that includes the following criteria Discussion: Utilization of the Betty Neuman Health Care Systems Model: 2. Define theory and the purpose of theory. 3. Define and discuss the nursing metaparadigm. a. Explain each of the four concepts that comprise the nursing metaparadigm 4. Explain the importance of theory in nursing practice. a. provide and discuss two examples from current practice 5. The scholarly paper should be 4-5 pages excluding the title and reference pages. 6. Include level 1 and level 2 headings. 7. The paper should begin with an introductory paragraph that includes the purpose statement. The introductory paragraph and purpose statement allow the reader to understand what the paper/assignment is going to address. 8. The paper should include a conclusion. 9. Write the paper in third person, not first person (meaning do not use ‘we’ or ‘I’). 10. Include a minimum of three references from professional peer-reviewed nursing journals (review in Ulrich Periodical Directory) to support the paper. ***You may use historical references. (Definition of historical reference: reference to a well-known person, place event or literary work that adds meaning to the paper.) 11. APA format is required (attention to spelling/grammar, a title page, a reference page, and in-text citations). attachment_1 attachment_2 attachment_3 BRIEFS The Birth of a Curriculum: Utilization of the Betty Neuman Health Care Systems Model in an Integrated Baccalaureate Program SISTER LORELDA KILCHENSTEIN, RN, MSN, Assistant Professor. Maternity Nursing; IRENE M. YAKULIS, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor and Director, Junior Year Undergraduate Program, University of Pittsburgh School ol Nursing, Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania The authors acknowledge the support of Dr Jane Knox, Associate Dean tor Undergraduate Academic Attairs, in the preparation otthis ariicie. The authors have had the recent experience of participating in a total cumculum revision. In this article we would like to share our curriculum revision process and the results of our efforts — the current integrated nursing curriculum at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing. The current undergraduate curriculum at the University of Pittsburgh began as a tiny developing embryo. A Curriculum Revision T^sk Force, with representatives from each clinical area and with an appointed Curriculum Director, was fonned to lead the faculty in the work of revision. As many other nursing programs had already discovered, the rationale for change was all too apparent: lack of a permeating conceptual framework; repetition of content; emphasis on acute care; a lengthy, expensive program; and inflexible schedules with limited regard for the student who was “different.” To nurture our curriculum embryo the faculty investigated social, political, economic and health trends, invited curriculum consultants, conducted total faculty workshops, and labored in small work groups. The critical path technique was utilized to identify the steps in the revision process: philosophy, purpose, program objectives, conceptual framework, level objectives, course behaviors, and evaluation. Finally, a conceptual framework emerged from the joint efforts ofthe Curriculum Revision T^k Force and the total faculty. If you, the reader, have utilized total faculty input for curriculum development, you will know that we chose a long, rocky road. However, you will understand the feeling of being able to share with all faculty, a curriculum attained through mutual struggle. 126 The conceptual framework of our curriculum was derived from the major concepts valued by the faculty and also from adopted components ofthe “Betty Neuman HealthCare Systems Model: A Total Approach to Patient Problems” (Riehl and Roy, 1974, pp. 99-110). In the Neuman Model, man is looked upon as an open system in contact with his environment, Man as an open system strives to maintain varying degrees of harmony and balance between the internal and external environment. Normal lines of defense protect the individual, and represent his state of wellness and his usual level of adaptation. Discussion: Utilization of the Betty Neuman Health Care Systems Model These normal lines of defense include physiological, psychological, sociocultural, and developmental variables. Health is viewed as being on a continuum with movement between a state of optimum well-being and degrees of deviation. The health of man is dependent upon both the system as a whole and the ability of the system to interact with stressors. Depending upon man’s reactions to stressors, primary, secondary and tertiary prevention may be needed, so that he may either return to or maintain optimum well-being. Nursing focuses on man as an individual, family, or society. Tbe goal of nursing is to assist man to attain a maximal level of health through the use of purposeful interventions aimed toward strengthening adaptive mechanisms or decreasing stress factors. In achieving this goal, nursing utilized the nursing process as the mode of practice for primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention. After the faculty had agreed upon the conceptual framework, we knew that the developing embryo must continue to be nourished. We arrived at a consensus regarding theoretical formulations that would strengthen the curriculum. The major theoretical formulations included: systems theory, stress reaction theory, change theory, and role theory. These theoretical formulations infiuenced the selection of content and served to cement our concepts together. In addition to the theoretical formulations, vertical and horizontal strands were developed. The strands are viewed as pervasive organizing themes throughout the curriculum. They are derived from the philosophy of the school, the program objectives and the conceptual framework. The vertical strands identify the concepts of progression that occur as the student moves upward from one level to the next. They include: Man as an Individual, Family and Society; Health Continuum, Levels of Prevention, Health Education, Research, and Leadership. The horizontal strands are used throughout the learning experience. They include: Knowledge, Nursing Process, and the Professional Nursing Role. We view the Professional Nursing Role as that of care giver, with selected behaviors related to Research, Health Education and Leadership. Figure 1 demonstrates the progression and permeation of the strands in our curriculum. The identification of stressors is a key component of the Betty Neuman Model. Because of the wide range of potential stressors in the universe, faculty recognized the need to identify broad constructs which could be used to categorize the stressors. The faculty identified five constructs as essential for man to maintain a state of equilibrium with his environment. Discussion: Utilization of the Betty Neuman Health Care Systems Model These constructs form the base for the identification of stressors in clients throughout the curriculum. They also serve to organize the curriculum content and to assist the student in the analysis of data. These constructs are defined in Figure 2. The curriculum is designed to cover four academic years of full-time study. Courses in the School of Nursing are taken concurrently with courses in the College of Arts and Sciences throughout the four years. Many of the courses were selected to refiect our concern for the dimensions of man. Psychology, Biological Nature of Man, Cultural and Ethnic Infiuences on Man, and Human Development are included in the Freshman year. These courses provide a knowledge base that will enable tbe student to understand the psychological, physiological, socio-cultural and developmental variables which are central to our view of man. In the selection of courses, consideration was also given to the curriculum strands. An introductory Research course was VOL. 23, NO. 3, MARCH 1984 SummaTy The authors have described the birth of an integrated baccalaureate curriculum at JOURNAL OF NURSING EDUCATION FIGURE 1 CURRICULUM STRANDS Senior Year NOI included in the Sophomore year to provide support for the vertical strand of Research. The strands of leadership and health education are introduced in the Freshman year and built upon in subsequent years. However, the Senior year nursing courses — Health Issues, Health Tfeam Collaboration and Professional Nursing Role — provide in-depth knowledge and practice for these strands. The Freshman year establishes the foundation for the study of nursing. Knowledge ofthe nursing process is presented. During this year students are introduced to Man, Health, and Nursing as these concepts are described in our conceptual framework. The focus of the Sophomore year is primary prevention. The clinical courses during this year emphasize the use ofthe nursing process with healthy individuals to identify possible risk factors associated with stressors and to maintain and strengthen the individuals’ lines of defense. Clinical experiences are offered in a variety of settings and all students have experience with children, pregnant women, adults, and the elderly. The Junior year courses focus upon secondary and tertiary prevention with the individual and family who are experiencing the stress of illness. The students apply the nursing process to minimize the effects of stressors which have penetrated man’s lines of defense and to facilitate his restabilization. The clinical experiences are designed so that all students will have contact with children, maternity clients, adults, the elderly and the mentally ill. During the Senior year, students’ experiences are planned to facilitate synthesis of knowledge and the application ofthe nursing process with clients in all levels of prevention and in a variety of settings. The emphasis is on individual, family, and group systems experiencing stressors which may result or have resulted in major health problems. Discussion: Utilization of the Betty Neuman Health Care Systems Model Students are also expected to increase their competence in carrying out the behaviors inherent in the professional nursing role. The ultimate purpose of our baccalaureate program is to prepare a professional practitioner of nursing, who. through the use ofthe nursing process can assist individuals, families and groups in a variety of settings to achieve and maintain optimal health. We believe our program also provides a foundation for continuing intellectual and personal development. t- O < U Z LU > Junior Year LU H Q. Z) a LU u. O I3 1 LU Sophomore Year LU CO LU X CO X (T 0 OC LU I liJ PROFESSIONAL NURSING ROLE Freshman Year NURSING PROCESS KNOWLEDGE — Senior Year (Empirical and Theoretical) Vertical Concept of progression from the Freshman Year to the Senior Year Horizontal Concepts to guide and direct students during their learning experiences Curriculum Revision Task Force 11979). Faculty Packet Unpublished manuscript. University of Pittsburgh. School of Nursing. FIGURE 2 Mobility — state ot being capable of movir>g; of facilitating a movement Integrity — harmonious interaction between the dimensions of man, a stale of wholeness, being complete, intact, sound Ingestion/Egestion — Ingestion — process whereby substances are taken into and utilized by the body Egestion — the yield or total of anylhmgproducedbythebody.i e .energy, or metabolic by-products excreted via kidneys, lungs, skin and G I tract Stimulation — dynamic process whereby a being is excited toward activity and growth, which includes those factors which energize vital activities and maintain ones awareness and interest in life Affiliation — refers to the state of relating or belonging to someone, a cause or a goal, cither than oneself. It is the need to be associated with others in an interdependent way It deals with the development of the capacity to give and receive from others, a lifelong process of socialization Curncufum Revision Task Force. (1979)- Faculty Packet Unpublished manuscript. University of Pittsburgh. School of Nursing. the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing. The curriculum design reflects our philosophy and our conceptual framework and includes components ofthe Betty Neuman Health Care Systems Model, The major theoretical formulations, the vertical and horizontal strands and the constructs for categorization of stressors are also described. Reference Riehl. J.P, Roy. C (19741. Conceptual models for nursing practice. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofls. 127 Guest Editorial Honoring Dr. Betty Neuman’s Contributions to Nursing Science Editor’s Note Betty Neuman is a leader in the development of nursing knowledge. Many of her works have been published in Nursing Science Quarterly over the last 25 years.The Editorial Board is pleased to honor her and her work with this special issue. Nursing Science Quarterly 25(4) 297–299 © The Author(s) 2012 Reprints and permission: sagepub.com/journalsPermissions.nav DOI: 10.1177/0894318412457064 http://nsq.sagepub.com Eileen Gigliotti, RN; PhD1 Keywords Neuman systems model Betty Neuman Reflective of the continued development of the Neuman sys- tems model (NSM) since its inception in 1970, the 13th Biennial Neuman SystemsDiscussion: Utilization of the Betty Neuman Health Care Systems Model Model Symposium (June, 2011) featured presentations concerning innovations in NSM- based education, practice, and research from both novices and experts. At the symposium, Dr. Neuman humbly expressed her gratefulness to all for their enthusiastic use of the model noting that, though she created the model, it is its innovative use by educators, practitioners, and researchers alike that is the basis of its success. As a tribute to Dr. Neuman’s vision and graciousness, I would like to focus this guest editorial on recent innovative uses of the NSM, many of which are detailed in the issue. 1Professor,The City University of NewYork,The College of Staten Island; Professor and Deputy Executive Officer,The Graduate Center,NewYork Editor: Rosemarie Rizzo Parse, RN, PhD, FAAN, Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Loyola University Chicago, 320 Fort Duquesne Blvd. #25H, Pittsburgh, PA 15222 Email: [email protected] 298 Nursing Science Quarterly 25(4) Several years ago, to further the development of the NSM and highlight innovations, the NSM Trustee Group decided to establish centers of NSM excellence. The first established center was the NSM Research Institute, in June 2004, to help further the use of the NSM as a research model and to build ties among NSM researchers. Since that time, five NSM research fellows have been named, in recognition of their contributions. In addition, a research grant was established in honor of Dr. Patricia Chadwick, a past NSM trustee who was committed to excellence in scholarship. To date, two research grants have been awarded. Also, in June 2008, the NSM Research Institute held its first think tank at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York where lively dis- cussion among invited NSM scholars centered on varied conceptualizations of NSM. One result of this discussion was Dr. Neuman’s changing the wording of her description of a core response in the new- est NSM text (Neuman, 2011), to include all person variables and to clarify that one could reconstitute after a core response. Another breakthrough was Gehrling’s (2011) clarification of the dual nature of the concept of reconstitution. These new advances, as well as others, are detailed in my article in this present edition. In addition, at the 13th Biennial NSM symposium, Dr. Theresa Gunter Lawson, a 2011 NSM research fellow, reflected on building her program of research concerning sexually-transmitted diseases and adolescents (Gunter- Lawson, 2011) and Dr. Nancy Manister, the 2011 recipient of the research grant, presented her work on obesity among clergy (Manister, 2011). Notably, Manister’s study (Manister, 2012), the first to empirically test relations among the normal line of defense, lines of resistance, and core response, reflects Neuman’s clarified core response. The theoretical rationale for her study is presented as an exemplar in this issue. Following establishment of the Research Institute, the Educational Academy was established in 2010 at the Biennial Trustee Meeting in The Netherlands. This award was named in honor of Dr. Rosalie Mirenda (NSM Trustee Emeritus) and, at the 13th Biennial Symposium the first NSM educa- tion fellows were named: Anna Helewka and Sanna Boxley- Harges. Discussion: Utilization of the Betty Neuman Health Care Systems Model With many years experience using the NSM in nursing education in Canada and the United States respec- tively, they led the education plenary session presenting the need for rigorous inquiry into nursing curriculum design. Notably, they focused on practical applications and adapting the NSM-based curriculum to the needs of the millennial learner (Boxley-Harges & Helewka, 2011) This plenary session also highlighted the continued use of the NSM as an educational model and the contributions of Dr. Lois Lowry were recognized. Dr. Lowry has assisted countless nursing programs to develop NSM-based curricula and is greatly responsible for the continued widespread use of the NSM as both an educational and a research model. In this issue, Sanna Boxley-Harges, along with colleague Sara Beckman provide further insight into lessons learned in implementing an NSM-based curriculum which they gleaned from their many years of leadership in nursing education. Also in this issue Marilyn McClure presents her innovative work (McClure, 2011) on using the NSM in simulation debriefing sessions. Finally, in 2011, the NSM Practice Center was established. At the symposium’s practice plenary session, Breckenridge and colleagues presented work on four translational research projects using the NSM-based RAIN (Research Approach in Nursing) model (Breckenridge, Grosik, Kristiniak, & Shields, 2011). Breckenridge’s (2011) RAIN model is a major reason why Abington Memorial Hospital, in Pennsylvania has been designated a Magnet Hospital. At this plenary session, innovations in practice were also the focus of colleagues from The Netherlands (de Kuiper, de Jong, & Dobbenberg, 2011) where the NSM has been adopted as a model for nursing practice in several institu- tions. In addition, Merks (2011) presented his work on implementation of the NSM in The Netherlands, and his work is featured in Baumann’s international column in this issue. As well, Lowry’s research highlights spirituality as a focal person variable, and in this issue, both her research and the research of Cobb shed new light on the role of spirituality in nursing practice. I, and countless others, know from personal experience that it is Dr. Neuman who has made such innovations possi- ble. She has consistently been accessible, enthusiastic, and open to new uses of the model. Discussion: Utilization of the Betty Neuman Health Care Systems Model It has thus been an honor to write this guest editorial for the NSM issue and to dedicate this issue to Dr. Betty Neuman who is truly the wind beneath our wings. Declaration of Conflicting Interests The author(s) declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article. Funding The author(s) received no financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article References Boxley-Harges, S., & Helewka, A. (2011, June). Evidence based education: Reality or created environment? Paper presented at the 13th Biennial Neuman Systems Model Symposium, Lehigh Valley, PA. Breckenridge, D. (2011). The Neuman systems model and evidence based nursing practice. In B. Neuman & J. Fawcett (Eds.), The Neuman systems model (5th ed., pp. 245-252). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education. Breckenridge, D., Grosik, C., Kristiniak, S., & Shields, K. (2011, June). NSM theory guided evidence based practice in USA- Magnet hospitals. Paper presented at the 13th Biennial Neuman Systems Model Symposium, Lehigh Valley, PA. Gigliotti 299 de Kuiper, M., de Jong, A., & Dobbenberg, A. (2011, June). Chang- ing healthcare in the Netherlands and the theoretical contribu- tion of the NSM. Paper presented at the 13th Biennial Neuman Systems Model Symposium, Lehigh Valley, PA. Gehrling, K. R. (2011). Reconstitution. In B. Neuman & J. Fawcett (Eds.), The Neuman systems model (5th ed., pp 89-99). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education. Gunter-Lawson, T. (2011, June). Application of the Neuman sys- tems model to the work of a teacher-scholar. Paper presented at the 13th Biennial Neuman Systems Model Symposium, Lehigh Valley, PA. Manister, N. (2011, June). Role stress and eating behaviors among clergy. Paper presented at the 13th Biennial Neuman Systems Model Symposium, Lehigh Valley, PA. Manister, N. (2012). The relations between role stress, eating behav- iors and obesity in congregational clergy. (Doctoral dissertation, The City University of New York, 2012). Dissertation Abstracts International. McClure, M. (2011, June). Medieval metaphorical adaptation of the NSM as an educational tool in the patient simulation labo- ratory. Paper presented at the 13th Biennial Neuman Systems Model Symposium, Lehigh Valley, PA. Merks, A. (2011, June). The use of LJNMEI in the implementation of the NSM. Paper presented at the 13th Biennial Neuman Sys- tems Model Symposium, Lehigh Valley, PA. Neuman, B. (2011). The Neuman systems model. In B. Neuman & J. Fawcett (Eds.), The Neuman systems model (5th ed., pp 3-33). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education. Research Issues Viol … Get a 10 % discount on an order above $ 100 Use the following coupon code : NURSING10

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Discussion: Utilization of the Betty Neuman Health Care Systems Model

Discussion: Utilization of the Betty Neuman Health Care Systems Model ORDER NOW FOR CUSTOMIZED AND ORIGINAL ESSAY PAPERS ON Discussion: Utilization of the Betty Neuman Health Care Systems Model For this assignment develop a scholarly paper that includes the following criteria Discussion: Utilization of the Betty Neuman Health Care Systems Model: 2. Define theory and the purpose of theory. 3. Define and discuss the nursing metaparadigm. a. Explain each of the four concepts that comprise the nursing metaparadigm 4. Explain the importance of theory in nursing practice. a. provide and discuss two examples from current practice 5. The scholarly paper should be 4-5 pages excluding the title and reference pages. 6. Include level 1 and level 2 headings. 7. The paper should begin with an introductory paragraph that includes the purpose statement. The introductory paragraph and purpose statement allow the reader to understand what the paper/assignment is going to address. 8. The paper should include a conclusion. 9. Write the paper in third person, not first person (meaning do not use ‘we’ or ‘I’). 10. Include a minimum of three references from professional peer-reviewed nursing journals (review in Ulrich Periodical Directory) to support the paper. ***You may use historical references. (Definition of historical reference: reference to a well-known person, place event or literary work that adds meaning to the paper.) 11. APA format is required (attention to spelling/grammar, a title page, a reference page, and in-text citations). attachment_1 attachment_2 attachment_3 BRIEFS The Birth of a Curriculum: Utilization of the Betty Neuman Health Care Systems Model in an Integrated Baccalaureate Program SISTER LORELDA KILCHENSTEIN, RN, MSN, Assistant Professor. Maternity Nursing; IRENE M. YAKULIS, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor and Director, Junior Year Undergraduate Program, University of Pittsburgh School ol Nursing, Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania The authors acknowledge the support of Dr Jane Knox, Associate Dean tor Undergraduate Academic Attairs, in the preparation otthis ariicie. The authors have had the recent experience of participating in a total cumculum revision. In this article we would like to share our curriculum revision process and the results of our efforts — the current integrated nursing curriculum at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing. The current undergraduate curriculum at the University of Pittsburgh began as a tiny developing embryo. A Curriculum Revision T^sk Force, with representatives from each clinical area and with an appointed Curriculum Director, was fonned to lead the faculty in the work of revision. As many other nursing programs had already discovered, the rationale for change was all too apparent: lack of a permeating conceptual framework; repetition of content; emphasis on acute care; a lengthy, expensive program; and inflexible schedules with limited regard for the student who was “different.” To nurture our curriculum embryo the faculty investigated social, political, economic and health trends, invited curriculum consultants, conducted total faculty workshops, and labored in small work groups. The critical path technique was utilized to identify the steps in the revision process: philosophy, purpose, program objectives, conceptual framework, level objectives, course behaviors, and evaluation. Finally, a conceptual framework emerged from the joint efforts ofthe Curriculum Revision T^k Force and the total faculty. If you, the reader, have utilized total faculty input for curriculum development, you will know that we chose a long, rocky road. However, you will understand the feeling of being able to share with all faculty, a curriculum attained through mutual struggle. 126 The conceptual framework of our curriculum was derived from the major concepts valued by the faculty and also from adopted components ofthe “Betty Neuman HealthCare Systems Model: A Total Approach to Patient Problems” (Riehl and Roy, 1974, pp. 99-110). In the Neuman Model, man is looked upon as an open system in contact with his environment, Man as an open system strives to maintain varying degrees of harmony and balance between the internal and external environment. Normal lines of defense protect the individual, and represent his state of wellness and his usual level of adaptation. Discussion: Utilization of the Betty Neuman Health Care Systems Model These normal lines of defense include physiological, psychological, sociocultural, and developmental variables. Health is viewed as being on a continuum with movement between a state of optimum well-being and degrees of deviation. The health of man is dependent upon both the system as a whole and the ability of the system to interact with stressors. Depending upon man’s reactions to stressors, primary, secondary and tertiary prevention may be needed, so that he may either return to or maintain optimum well-being. Nursing focuses on man as an individual, family, or society. Tbe goal of nursing is to assist man to attain a maximal level of health through the use of purposeful interventions aimed toward strengthening adaptive mechanisms or decreasing stress factors. In achieving this goal, nursing utilized the nursing process as the mode of practice for primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention. After the faculty had agreed upon the conceptual framework, we knew that the developing embryo must continue to be nourished. We arrived at a consensus regarding theoretical formulations that would strengthen the curriculum. The major theoretical formulations included: systems theory, stress reaction theory, change theory, and role theory. These theoretical formulations infiuenced the selection of content and served to cement our concepts together. In addition to the theoretical formulations, vertical and horizontal strands were developed. The strands are viewed as pervasive organizing themes throughout the curriculum. They are derived from the philosophy of the school, the program objectives and the conceptual framework. The vertical strands identify the concepts of progression that occur as the student moves upward from one level to the next. They include: Man as an Individual, Family and Society; Health Continuum, Levels of Prevention, Health Education, Research, and Leadership. The horizontal strands are used throughout the learning experience. They include: Knowledge, Nursing Process, and the Professional Nursing Role. We view the Professional Nursing Role as that of care giver, with selected behaviors related to Research, Health Education and Leadership. Figure 1 demonstrates the progression and permeation of the strands in our curriculum. The identification of stressors is a key component of the Betty Neuman Model. Because of the wide range of potential stressors in the universe, faculty recognized the need to identify broad constructs which could be used to categorize the stressors. The faculty identified five constructs as essential for man to maintain a state of equilibrium with his environment. Discussion: Utilization of the Betty Neuman Health Care Systems Model These constructs form the base for the identification of stressors in clients throughout the curriculum. They also serve to organize the curriculum content and to assist the student in the analysis of data. These constructs are defined in Figure 2. The curriculum is designed to cover four academic years of full-time study. Courses in the School of Nursing are taken concurrently with courses in the College of Arts and Sciences throughout the four years. Many of the courses were selected to refiect our concern for the dimensions of man. Psychology, Biological Nature of Man, Cultural and Ethnic Infiuences on Man, and Human Development are included in the Freshman year. These courses provide a knowledge base that will enable tbe student to understand the psychological, physiological, socio-cultural and developmental variables which are central to our view of man. In the selection of courses, consideration was also given to the curriculum strands. An introductory Research course was VOL. 23, NO. 3, MARCH 1984 SummaTy The authors have described the birth of an integrated baccalaureate curriculum at JOURNAL OF NURSING EDUCATION FIGURE 1 CURRICULUM STRANDS Senior Year NOI included in the Sophomore year to provide support for the vertical strand of Research. The strands of leadership and health education are introduced in the Freshman year and built upon in subsequent years. However, the Senior year nursing courses — Health Issues, Health Tfeam Collaboration and Professional Nursing Role — provide in-depth knowledge and practice for these strands. The Freshman year establishes the foundation for the study of nursing. Knowledge ofthe nursing process is presented. During this year students are introduced to Man, Health, and Nursing as these concepts are described in our conceptual framework. The focus of the Sophomore year is primary prevention. The clinical courses during this year emphasize the use ofthe nursing process with healthy individuals to identify possible risk factors associated with stressors and to maintain and strengthen the individuals’ lines of defense. Clinical experiences are offered in a variety of settings and all students have experience with children, pregnant women, adults, and the elderly. The Junior year courses focus upon secondary and tertiary prevention with the individual and family who are experiencing the stress of illness. The students apply the nursing process to minimize the effects of stressors which have penetrated man’s lines of defense and to facilitate his restabilization. The clinical experiences are designed so that all students will have contact with children, maternity clients, adults, the elderly and the mentally ill. During the Senior year, students’ experiences are planned to facilitate synthesis of knowledge and the application ofthe nursing process with clients in all levels of prevention and in a variety of settings. The emphasis is on individual, family, and group systems experiencing stressors which may result or have resulted in major health problems. Discussion: Utilization of the Betty Neuman Health Care Systems Model Students are also expected to increase their competence in carrying out the behaviors inherent in the professional nursing role. The ultimate purpose of our baccalaureate program is to prepare a professional practitioner of nursing, who. through the use ofthe nursing process can assist individuals, families and groups in a variety of settings to achieve and maintain optimal health. We believe our program also provides a foundation for continuing intellectual and personal development. t- O < U Z LU > Junior Year LU H Q. Z) a LU u. O I3 1 LU Sophomore Year LU CO LU X CO X (T 0 OC LU I liJ PROFESSIONAL NURSING ROLE Freshman Year NURSING PROCESS KNOWLEDGE — Senior Year (Empirical and Theoretical) Vertical Concept of progression from the Freshman Year to the Senior Year Horizontal Concepts to guide and direct students during their learning experiences Curriculum Revision Task Force 11979). Faculty Packet Unpublished manuscript. University of Pittsburgh. School of Nursing. FIGURE 2 Mobility — state ot being capable of movir>g; of facilitating a movement Integrity — harmonious interaction between the dimensions of man, a stale of wholeness, being complete, intact, sound Ingestion/Egestion — Ingestion — process whereby substances are taken into and utilized by the body Egestion — the yield or total of anylhmgproducedbythebody.i e .energy, or metabolic by-products excreted via kidneys, lungs, skin and G I tract Stimulation — dynamic process whereby a being is excited toward activity and growth, which includes those factors which energize vital activities and maintain ones awareness and interest in life Affiliation — refers to the state of relating or belonging to someone, a cause or a goal, cither than oneself. It is the need to be associated with others in an interdependent way It deals with the development of the capacity to give and receive from others, a lifelong process of socialization Curncufum Revision Task Force. (1979)- Faculty Packet Unpublished manuscript. University of Pittsburgh. School of Nursing. the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing. The curriculum design reflects our philosophy and our conceptual framework and includes components ofthe Betty Neuman Health Care Systems Model, The major theoretical formulations, the vertical and horizontal strands and the constructs for categorization of stressors are also described. Reference Riehl. J.P, Roy. C (19741. Conceptual models for nursing practice. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofls. 127 Guest Editorial Honoring Dr. Betty Neuman’s Contributions to Nursing Science Editor’s Note Betty Neuman is a leader in the development of nursing knowledge. Many of her works have been published in Nursing Science Quarterly over the last 25 years.The Editorial Board is pleased to honor her and her work with this special issue. Nursing Science Quarterly 25(4) 297–299 © The Author(s) 2012 Reprints and permission: sagepub.com/journalsPermissions.nav DOI: 10.1177/0894318412457064 http://nsq.sagepub.com Eileen Gigliotti, RN; PhD1 Keywords Neuman systems model Betty Neuman Reflective of the continued development of the Neuman sys- tems model (NSM) since its inception in 1970, the 13th Biennial Neuman SystemsDiscussion: Utilization of the Betty Neuman Health Care Systems Model Model Symposium (June, 2011) featured presentations concerning innovations in NSM- based education, practice, and research from both novices and experts. At the symposium, Dr. Neuman humbly expressed her gratefulness to all for their enthusiastic use of the model noting that, though she created the model, it is its innovative use by educators, practitioners, and researchers alike that is the basis of its success. As a tribute to Dr. Neuman’s vision and graciousness, I would like to focus this guest editorial on recent innovative uses of the NSM, many of which are detailed in the issue. 1Professor,The City University of NewYork,The College of Staten Island; Professor and Deputy Executive Officer,The Graduate Center,NewYork Editor: Rosemarie Rizzo Parse, RN, PhD, FAAN, Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Loyola University Chicago, 320 Fort Duquesne Blvd. #25H, Pittsburgh, PA 15222 Email: [email protected] 298 Nursing Science Quarterly 25(4) Several years ago, to further the development of the NSM and highlight innovations, the NSM Trustee Group decided to establish centers of NSM excellence. The first established center was the NSM Research Institute, in June 2004, to help further the use of the NSM as a research model and to build ties among NSM researchers. Since that time, five NSM research fellows have been named, in recognition of their contributions. In addition, a research grant was established in honor of Dr. Patricia Chadwick, a past NSM trustee who was committed to excellence in scholarship. To date, two research grants have been awarded. Also, in June 2008, the NSM Research Institute held its first think tank at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York where lively dis- cussion among invited NSM scholars centered on varied conceptualizations of NSM. One result of this discussion was Dr. Neuman’s changing the wording of her description of a core response in the new- est NSM text (Neuman, 2011), to include all person variables and to clarify that one could reconstitute after a core response. Another breakthrough was Gehrling’s (2011) clarification of the dual nature of the concept of reconstitution. These new advances, as well as others, are detailed in my article in this present edition. In addition, at the 13th Biennial NSM symposium, Dr. Theresa Gunter Lawson, a 2011 NSM research fellow, reflected on building her program of research concerning sexually-transmitted diseases and adolescents (Gunter- Lawson, 2011) and Dr. Nancy Manister, the 2011 recipient of the research grant, presented her work on obesity among clergy (Manister, 2011). Notably, Manister’s study (Manister, 2012), the first to empirically test relations among the normal line of defense, lines of resistance, and core response, reflects Neuman’s clarified core response. The theoretical rationale for her study is presented as an exemplar in this issue. Following establishment of the Research Institute, the Educational Academy was established in 2010 at the Biennial Trustee Meeting in The Netherlands. This award was named in honor of Dr. Rosalie Mirenda (NSM Trustee Emeritus) and, at the 13th Biennial Symposium the first NSM educa- tion fellows were named: Anna Helewka and Sanna Boxley- Harges. Discussion: Utilization of the Betty Neuman Health Care Systems Model With many years experience using the NSM in nursing education in Canada and the United States respec- tively, they led the education plenary session presenting the need for rigorous inquiry into nursing curriculum design. Notably, they focused on practical applications and adapting the NSM-based curriculum to the needs of the millennial learner (Boxley-Harges & Helewka, 2011) This plenary session also highlighted the continued use of the NSM as an educational model and the contributions of Dr. Lois Lowry were recognized. Dr. Lowry has assisted countless nursing programs to develop NSM-based curricula and is greatly responsible for the continued widespread use of the NSM as both an educational and a research model. In this issue, Sanna Boxley-Harges, along with colleague Sara Beckman provide further insight into lessons learned in implementing an NSM-based curriculum which they gleaned from their many years of leadership in nursing education. Also in this issue Marilyn McClure presents her innovative work (McClure, 2011) on using the NSM in simulation debriefing sessions. Finally, in 2011, the NSM Practice Center was established. At the symposium’s practice plenary session, Breckenridge and colleagues presented work on four translational research projects using the NSM-based RAIN (Research Approach in Nursing) model (Breckenridge, Grosik, Kristiniak, & Shields, 2011). Breckenridge’s (2011) RAIN model is a major reason why Abington Memorial Hospital, in Pennsylvania has been designated a Magnet Hospital. At this plenary session, innovations in practice were also the focus of colleagues from The Netherlands (de Kuiper, de Jong, & Dobbenberg, 2011) where the NSM has been adopted as a model for nursing practice in several institu- tions. In addition, Merks (2011) presented his work on implementation of the NSM in The Netherlands, and his work is featured in Baumann’s international column in this issue. As well, Lowry’s research highlights spirituality as a focal person variable, and in this issue, both her research and the research of Cobb shed new light on the role of spirituality in nursing practice. I, and countless others, know from personal experience that it is Dr. Neuman who has made such innovations possi- ble. She has consistently been accessible, enthusiastic, and open to new uses of the model. Discussion: Utilization of the Betty Neuman Health Care Systems Model It has thus been an honor to write this guest editorial for the NSM issue and to dedicate this issue to Dr. Betty Neuman who is truly the wind beneath our wings. Declaration of Conflicting Interests The author(s) declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article. Funding The author(s) received no financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article References Boxley-Harges, S., & Helewka, A. (2011, June). Evidence based education: Reality or created environment? Paper presented at the 13th Biennial Neuman Systems Model Symposium, Lehigh Valley, PA. Breckenridge, D. (2011). The Neuman systems model and evidence based nursing practice. In B. Neuman & J. Fawcett (Eds.), The Neuman systems model (5th ed., pp. 245-252). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education. Breckenridge, D., Grosik, C., Kristiniak, S., & Shields, K. (2011, June). NSM theory guided evidence based practice in USA- Magnet hospitals. Paper presented at the 13th Biennial Neuman Systems Model Symposium, Lehigh Valley, PA. Gigliotti 299 de Kuiper, M., de Jong, A., & Dobbenberg, A. (2011, June). Chang- ing healthcare in the Netherlands and the theoretical contribu- tion of the NSM. Paper presented at the 13th Biennial Neuman Systems Model Symposium, Lehigh Valley, PA. Gehrling, K. R. (2011). Reconstitution. In B. Neuman & J. Fawcett (Eds.), The Neuman systems model (5th ed., pp 89-99). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education. Gunter-Lawson, T. (2011, June). Application of the Neuman sys- tems model to the work of a teacher-scholar. Paper presented at the 13th Biennial Neuman Systems Model Symposium, Lehigh Valley, PA. Manister, N. (2011, June). Role stress and eating behaviors among clergy. Paper presented at the 13th Biennial Neuman Systems Model Symposium, Lehigh Valley, PA. Manister, N. (2012). The relations between role stress, eating behav- iors and obesity in congregational clergy. (Doctoral dissertation, The City University of New York, 2012). Dissertation Abstracts International. McClure, M. (2011, June). Medieval metaphorical adaptation of the NSM as an educational tool in the patient simulation labo- ratory. Paper presented at the 13th Biennial Neuman Systems Model Symposium, Lehigh Valley, PA. Merks, A. (2011, June). The use of LJNMEI in the implementation of the NSM. Paper presented at the 13th Biennial Neuman Sys- tems Model Symposium, Lehigh Valley, PA. Neuman, B. (2011). The Neuman systems model. In B. Neuman & J. Fawcett (Eds.), The Neuman systems model (5th ed., pp 3-33). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education. Research Issues Viol … Get a 10 % discount on an order above $ 100 Use the following coupon code : NURSING10

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