Everglades University Orlando Social Media and Emotion Contrasting Views Essay 

Everglades University Orlando Social Media and Emotion Contrasting Views Essay Everglades University Orlando Social Media and Emotion Contrasting Views Essay ORDER NOW FOR CUSTOMIZED AND ORIGINAL NURSING PAPERS Question Description I’m working on a Psychology exercise and need support. Read your textbook chapters 9 and 10. This discussion focuses on chapter 9 and topics of emotion, the need to belong, making connections and social networking. Also read the articles “Science Blog – The First Side of the Coin, The Link Between Social Media and Happiness” and “Childmind.org – The Other Side of the Coin, The link Between Social Media and Depression” give a brief summary of the articles while focusing on the topic of social media and emotion. Then, discuss whether you believe that your connections on social media increase your sense of belonging? Why or why not? Does participation in social media make you happier? Sometimes, do they make you feel lonely or sad? Why or why not? Conclude by discussing your final verdict on the matter. Now that you’ve read about both sides of the coin/argument, which do you believe have more supporting evidence? Please make your initial post of approximately 300-400 words by Thursday at 11:59pm (eastern time) Remember, it is the quality of your discussion and responses that is the most important! Keep in mind that we are not in a traditional classroom environment and cannot have typical classroom discussions. This is meant to encourage similar interactions. Be creative and engaging! Be sure that you paraphrase information that you take from sources and properly attribute all content. Do not copy and paste the information. Unformatted Attachment Preview Chapter 9 – Learning Objectives: Motivational Concepts 9-1. Define motivation, and identify three key perspectives that help us understand motivated behaviors. Hunger 9-2. Describe the physiological factors that cause us to feel hungry. 9-3. Explain how cultural and situational factors affect our taste preferences and eating habits. 9-4. Explain how obesity affects physical and psychological health, and identify the factors involved in weight management. The Need to Belong 9-5. Discuss the evidence that points to our human need to belong. 9-6. Describe how social networking influences us. Achievement Motivation 9-7. Define achievement motivation, and describe some ways to encourage achievement. Emotion: Arousal, Behavior, and Cognition 9-8. Identify the three parts of an emotion, and discuss the theories that help us to understand our emotions. Embodied Emotion 9-9. Identify some basic emotions. 9-10. Describe the link between emotional arousal and the autonomic nervous system. 9-11. Describe how our body states relate to specific emotions. 9-12. Discuss the effectiveness of polygraphs in using body states to detect lies. Expressed and Experienced Emotion 9-13. Describe how we communicate nonverbally, and discuss how women and men differ in these abilities. 9-14. Discuss how gestures and facial expressions of emotion are understood within and across cultures. 9-15. Describe how facial expressions influence our feelings. Chapter 9 – Summary: Motivation is a need or desire that energizes and directs behavior. Drive-reduction theory maintains that physiological needs create psychological drives that seek to restore internal stability, or homeostasis. In addition, some motivated behaviors increase arousal, and we are pulled by external incentives. According to Maslow, some motives are more compelling than others. The need to belong is a major influence in motivating human behavior. Social bonds boosted our ancestors’ survival rates. We experience our need to belong when feeling the gloom of loneliness or joy of love, and when seeking social acceptance. People who excel are often self-disciplined individuals with strong achievement motivation. Hunger seems to originate from changes in glucose and insulin levels that are monitored by areas deep in the brain within the hypothalamus, as well as changes in the levels of appetite hormones such as ghrelin.Everglades University Orlando Social Media and Emotion Contrasting Views Essay > To control weight, the body also adjusts its basal metabolic rate. Body chemistry and environmental factors together influence our taste preferences. In studying obesity, psychologists have found that a number of physiological factors make it difficult to lose weight permanently. Those who wish to diet should set realistic goals, minimize exposure to food cues, exercise, and make a lifelong change in eating patterns. Emotions are psychological responses that involve an interplay among (1) physiological arousal, (2) expressive behavior, and (3) conscious experience. James and Lange argued that we feel emotion after we notice our bodily responses. Cannon and Bard contended that we feel emotion when our body responds. Schachter and Singer’s twofactor theory states that to experience emotion, we must be aroused and cognitively label the emotion. Some emotional responses are immediate, as sensory input bypasses the cortex, triggering a rapid reaction outside our conscious awareness. Others, especially responses to complex emotions, require interpretation. Carroll Izard has identified 10 basic emotions, most of which are present in infancy. Other emotions are variations of these 10. Although the physical arousal that occurs with the different emotions is for the most part indistinguishable, researchers have discovered subtle differences in brain circuits, finger temperatures, and hormones. In using physiological indicators to detect lies, the polygraph does better than chance but not nearly well enough to justify its widespread use. The Concealed Information Test is more effective. We decipher people’s emotions by “reading” their bodies, voices, and faces. Women are superior to men in emotional sensitivity and responsiveness. Although some gestures are culturally determined, facial expressions, such as those of happiness and fear, are universal. Facial expressions not only communicate emotion but also amplify the felt emotion. Chapter 10 – Learning Objectives: Stress: Some Basic Concepts 10-1. Discuss how our appraisal of an event affects our stress reaction, and identify the three main types of stressors. 10-2. Describe how the body responds to stress. Stress Effects and Health 10-3. Explain how stress influences our immune system. 10-4. Describe how stress increases coronary heart disease risk. 10-5. Discuss whether stress causes illness. Coping With Stress 10-6. Identify two basic ways that people cope with stress. 10-7. Describe how our sense of control influences stress and health. 10-8. Describe how optimists and pessimists differ, and explain why our outlook on life matters. 10-9. Discuss how social support and finding meaning in life influence health. Managing Stress Effects 10-10. Describe how well aerobic exercise helps manage stress and improve wellbeing. 10-11. Describe the ways in which relaxation and meditation might influence stress and health. 10-12. Discuss whether religious involvement relates to health. Chapter 10 – Summary: Exposure to prolonged stress can increase our susceptibility to serious illness. Walter Cannon viewed our response to stress as a fight-or-flight system. Hans Selye saw it as a three-stage general adaptation syndrome. Modern research assesses the health consequences of various life experiences. The field of psychoneuro-immunology studies the mind-body interactions that may result from stress. Stress may affect the progression of several serious illnesses, including AIDS and cancer. Coronary heart disease has been linked with the anger-prone Type A personality. Several factors affect our ability to cope with stress, including our feelings of personal control, our basic outlook on life, and our supportive connections. Stress management programs include training in aerobic exercise, meditation, and relaxation. Researchers seek to identify factors that may link spirituality and health. Happiness boosts people’s perceptions of the world and their willingness to help others. However, even significant positive events seldom increase happiness for long, a fact explained by the adaptationlevel and relative deprivation principles. … Purchase answer to see full attachment Get a 10 % discount on an order above $ 100 Use the following coupon code : NURSING10

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Everglades University Orlando Social Media and Emotion Contrasting Views Essay 

Everglades University Orlando Social Media and Emotion Contrasting Views Essay Everglades University Orlando Social Media and Emotion Contrasting Views Essay ORDER NOW FOR CUSTOMIZED AND ORIGINAL NURSING PAPERS Question Description I’m working on a Psychology exercise and need support. Read your textbook chapters 9 and 10. This discussion focuses on chapter 9 and topics of emotion, the need to belong, making connections and social networking. Also read the articles “Science Blog – The First Side of the Coin, The Link Between Social Media and Happiness” and “Childmind.org – The Other Side of the Coin, The link Between Social Media and Depression” give a brief summary of the articles while focusing on the topic of social media and emotion. Then, discuss whether you believe that your connections on social media increase your sense of belonging? Why or why not? Does participation in social media make you happier? Sometimes, do they make you feel lonely or sad? Why or why not? Conclude by discussing your final verdict on the matter. Now that you’ve read about both sides of the coin/argument, which do you believe have more supporting evidence? Please make your initial post of approximately 300-400 words by Thursday at 11:59pm (eastern time) Remember, it is the quality of your discussion and responses that is the most important! Keep in mind that we are not in a traditional classroom environment and cannot have typical classroom discussions. This is meant to encourage similar interactions. Be creative and engaging! Be sure that you paraphrase information that you take from sources and properly attribute all content. Do not copy and paste the information. Unformatted Attachment Preview Chapter 9 – Learning Objectives: Motivational Concepts 9-1. Define motivation, and identify three key perspectives that help us understand motivated behaviors. Hunger 9-2. Describe the physiological factors that cause us to feel hungry. 9-3. Explain how cultural and situational factors affect our taste preferences and eating habits. 9-4. Explain how obesity affects physical and psychological health, and identify the factors involved in weight management. The Need to Belong 9-5. Discuss the evidence that points to our human need to belong. 9-6. Describe how social networking influences us. Achievement Motivation 9-7. Define achievement motivation, and describe some ways to encourage achievement. Emotion: Arousal, Behavior, and Cognition 9-8. Identify the three parts of an emotion, and discuss the theories that help us to understand our emotions. Embodied Emotion 9-9. Identify some basic emotions. 9-10. Describe the link between emotional arousal and the autonomic nervous system. 9-11. Describe how our body states relate to specific emotions. 9-12. Discuss the effectiveness of polygraphs in using body states to detect lies. Expressed and Experienced Emotion 9-13. Describe how we communicate nonverbally, and discuss how women and men differ in these abilities. 9-14. Discuss how gestures and facial expressions of emotion are understood within and across cultures. 9-15. Describe how facial expressions influence our feelings. Chapter 9 – Summary: Motivation is a need or desire that energizes and directs behavior. Drive-reduction theory maintains that physiological needs create psychological drives that seek to restore internal stability, or homeostasis. In addition, some motivated behaviors increase arousal, and we are pulled by external incentives. According to Maslow, some motives are more compelling than others. The need to belong is a major influence in motivating human behavior. Social bonds boosted our ancestors’ survival rates. We experience our need to belong when feeling the gloom of loneliness or joy of love, and when seeking social acceptance. People who excel are often self-disciplined individuals with strong achievement motivation. Hunger seems to originate from changes in glucose and insulin levels that are monitored by areas deep in the brain within the hypothalamus, as well as changes in the levels of appetite hormones such as ghrelin.Everglades University Orlando Social Media and Emotion Contrasting Views Essay > To control weight, the body also adjusts its basal metabolic rate. Body chemistry and environmental factors together influence our taste preferences. In studying obesity, psychologists have found that a number of physiological factors make it difficult to lose weight permanently. Those who wish to diet should set realistic goals, minimize exposure to food cues, exercise, and make a lifelong change in eating patterns. Emotions are psychological responses that involve an interplay among (1) physiological arousal, (2) expressive behavior, and (3) conscious experience. James and Lange argued that we feel emotion after we notice our bodily responses. Cannon and Bard contended that we feel emotion when our body responds. Schachter and Singer’s twofactor theory states that to experience emotion, we must be aroused and cognitively label the emotion. Some emotional responses are immediate, as sensory input bypasses the cortex, triggering a rapid reaction outside our conscious awareness. Others, especially responses to complex emotions, require interpretation. Carroll Izard has identified 10 basic emotions, most of which are present in infancy. Other emotions are variations of these 10. Although the physical arousal that occurs with the different emotions is for the most part indistinguishable, researchers have discovered subtle differences in brain circuits, finger temperatures, and hormones. In using physiological indicators to detect lies, the polygraph does better than chance but not nearly well enough to justify its widespread use. The Concealed Information Test is more effective. We decipher people’s emotions by “reading” their bodies, voices, and faces. Women are superior to men in emotional sensitivity and responsiveness. Although some gestures are culturally determined, facial expressions, such as those of happiness and fear, are universal. Facial expressions not only communicate emotion but also amplify the felt emotion. Chapter 10 – Learning Objectives: Stress: Some Basic Concepts 10-1. Discuss how our appraisal of an event affects our stress reaction, and identify the three main types of stressors. 10-2. Describe how the body responds to stress. Stress Effects and Health 10-3. Explain how stress influences our immune system. 10-4. Describe how stress increases coronary heart disease risk. 10-5. Discuss whether stress causes illness. Coping With Stress 10-6. Identify two basic ways that people cope with stress. 10-7. Describe how our sense of control influences stress and health. 10-8. Describe how optimists and pessimists differ, and explain why our outlook on life matters. 10-9. Discuss how social support and finding meaning in life influence health. Managing Stress Effects 10-10. Describe how well aerobic exercise helps manage stress and improve wellbeing. 10-11. Describe the ways in which relaxation and meditation might influence stress and health. 10-12. Discuss whether religious involvement relates to health. Chapter 10 – Summary: Exposure to prolonged stress can increase our susceptibility to serious illness. Walter Cannon viewed our response to stress as a fight-or-flight system. Hans Selye saw it as a three-stage general adaptation syndrome. Modern research assesses the health consequences of various life experiences. The field of psychoneuro-immunology studies the mind-body interactions that may result from stress. Stress may affect the progression of several serious illnesses, including AIDS and cancer. Coronary heart disease has been linked with the anger-prone Type A personality. Several factors affect our ability to cope with stress, including our feelings of personal control, our basic outlook on life, and our supportive connections. Stress management programs include training in aerobic exercise, meditation, and relaxation. Researchers seek to identify factors that may link spirituality and health. Happiness boosts people’s perceptions of the world and their willingness to help others. However, even significant positive events seldom increase happiness for long, a fact explained by the adaptationlevel and relative deprivation principles. … Purchase answer to see full attachment Get a 10 % discount on an order above $ 100 Use the following coupon code : NURSING10

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