NUR 513 Assemble a Body of Evidence Supporting your Proposal for Practice Change

NUR 513 Assemble a Body of Evidence Supporting your Proposal for Practice Change
Assemble a body of evidence supporting your proposal for practice change. Perform a literature review to gather research evidence. Critique the merit of each article using the information in Chapter 5 & 6 in Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt (2019) as a guide. Present relevant cultural and contextual factors, your own individual experience and degree of expertise in this area, and preferences and values of the population.
Use the qualitativePreview the document [XLSX, file size 21 KB] and quantitativePreview the document [XLSX, file size 21 KB] research score cards to help organize your work and develop your own thoughts about the merits of each study. It is not necessary to complete a critique if one of your sources is a clinical guideline. A completed research score card must be submitted for each article when you submit your paper. Submit all research score cards to the separate dropbox, using the appropriate score card for each study, labeled M6A1: Research Critique Forms Submission Only.
You should have a minimum of seven sources (external evidence) that provide evidence about your proposed change in practice.
All seven external sources must be primary sources, robust systematic reviews, or clinical guidelines derived form a large data base.
Five of these sources must be from peer-reviewed nursing journals.
NUR 513 Assemble a Body of Evidence Supporting your Proposal for Practice Change
Two sources can be from other disciplines (if appropriate), but must also be peer reviewed.
You may use a clinical guideline as one of your sources, if appropriate.
Phase III: Comparative Evaluation/Decision Making
Synthesize the results of the evidence. Logically present and analyze the evidence, comparing and contrasting the results. This is not an annotated bibliography or a series of summaries of each article. It is a synthesis of pertinent information from the evidence. Evaluate all of the available evidence (external sources, relevant cultural and contextual factors, your own individual experience and degree of expertise in this area, and preferences and values of the population) and determine if it provides sufficient evidence to support an evidence based practice change.
This portion of the paper should be 8-10 pages in length (not including title page or references) and is due Week 10. You will receive a grade on this portion of the paper and instructor feedback. You should review the feedback, and incorporate it into Part II. Your grade on Part II will be partially dependent on revisions made to Part I.
Refer to the Master’s Library Guide (Links to an external site.) for additional assistance. You can locate your specific course by clicking on the dropdown menu under, the Courses tab.
Evidence-based health care practices are available for a number of conditions such as asthma, heart failure, and diabetes. However, these practices are not always implemented in care delivery, and variation in practices abound.1–4 Traditionally, patient safety research has focused on data analyses to identify patient safety issues and to demonstrate that a new practice will lead to improved quality and patient safety.5 Much less research attention has been paid to how to implement practices. Yet, only by putting into practice what is learned from research will care be made safer.5 Implementing evidence-based safety practices are difficult and need strategies that address the complexity of systems of care, individual practitioners, senior leadership, and—ultimately—changing health care cultures to be evidence-based safety practice environments.5
Nursing has a rich history of using research in practice, pioneered by Florence Nightingale.6–9 Although during the early and mid-1900s, few nurses contributed to this foundation initiated by Nightingale,10 the nursing profession has more recently provided major leadership for improving care through application of research findings in practice.11
Evidence-based practice (EBP) is the conscientious and judicious use of current best evidence in conjunction with clinical expertise and patient values to guide health care decisions.12–15 Best evidence includes empirical evidence from randomized controlled trials; evidence from other scientific methods such as descriptive and qualitative research; as well as use of information from case reports, scientific principles, and expert opinion. When enough research evidence is available, the practice should be guided by research evidence in conjunction with clinical expertise and patient values. In some cases, however, a sufficient research base may not be available, and health care decision making is derived principally from nonresearch evidence sources such as expert opinion and scientific principles.16 As more research is done in a specific area, the research evidence must be incorporated into the EBP.

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