Strategies in Crisis Communication Paper

Strategies in Crisis Communication Paper ORDER NOW FOR CUSTOMIZED AND ORIGINAL ESSAY PAPERS ON Strategies in Crisis Communication Paper This final exam is due on Thursday, April 29 @ 7 PM. Please upload your exam to Moodle as a PDF. This exam follows universal design principles and accommodates extra time. You are being given 48 hours to complete an exam that was originally scheduled for two hours. This final exam is made up of 5 pages in total. In this exam, you will write an 800-1000 word crisis communication plan for Hawaii Emergency Management Agency (HI-EMA) in the event of a Ballistic Missile Event (BME). In this crisis plan, you will focus on redesigning the “Stay Tuned” portion of HI-EMA’s public messaging described in the attached document “Guidance Summary for Coordinated Public Messaging.” In particular, you should make recommendations about platforms and key messages for delivering timely retraction of information about emergency events, as well as a process for ensuring shared information is factual. You will draw on the provided information about the 2018 Hawaii ballistic missile event false alert and Hawaii Emergency Management Agency crisis plan that I have provided as supplementary reference materials in this PDF to guide your recommendations and revisions. Support the recommendations you make in your plan with reference to the theories and examples from our textbook, lecture, and discussion. You do not need to provide a reference list. This must be an original piece of writing. Thompson Rivers University CMNS 4240 Strategies in Crisis Communication Paper The rest info in the attached document attachment_1 CMNS4240 Strategies in Crisis Communication April 2021 Final Exam This final exam is due on Thursday, April 29 @ 7PM. Please upload your exam to Moodle as a PDF. This exam follows universal design principles and accommodates extra-time. You are being given 48 hours to complete an exam that was originally scheduled for two hours. This final exam is made up of 5 pages in total. In this exam, you will write an 800-1000 word crisis communication plan for the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency (HI-EMA) in the event of a Ballistic Missile Event (BME). In this crisis plan, you will focus on redesigning the “Stay Tuned” portion of HI-EMA’s public messaging described in the attached document “Guidance Summary for Coordinated Public Messaging.” In particular, you should make recommendations about platforms and key messages for delivering timely retraction of information about emergency events, as well as a process for ensuring shared information is factual. You will draw on the provided information about the 2018 Hawaii ballistic missile event false alert and Hawaii Emergency Management Agency crisis plan that I have provided as supplementary reference materials in this PDF to guide your recommendations and revisions. Support the recommendations you make in your plan with reference to the theories and examples from our textbook, lecture and discussion. You do not need to provide a reference list. This must be an original piece of writing. HAWAII STATE DEPARTMENT of DEFENSE Hawaii Emergency Management Agency GUIDANCE SUMMARY for COORDINATED PUBLIC MESSAGING Nuclear Detonation Revised: 27 JUN 2017.4 Triggers Sirens sound AttackWarning signal Emergency Alert System (EAS) advisory Wireless Emergency Alert (WEA) system advisory Brilliant white light (flash) is observed 1 2 Mnemonic Immediate Action Rationale 1. If you are indoors, stay indoors well away from windows. 2. If you are outdoors, seek immediate shelter in a building preferably a concrete structure such as a commercial building or parking structure. 3. If you are driving, pull safely to the side of the road and stop. If a shelter is very close, shelter in that structure. If not, remain in your vehicle and lay on the floor. Surviving the immediate effects of a nuclear detonation (blast, shock, thermal radiation, initial nuclear radiation) requires sheltering in resistant structures You may have only minutes to take protective action – take immediate action without delay There are no designated blast or fallout shelters in Hawaii 1. Remain sheltered until you are told it is safe to leave or two weeks (14 days) have passed, whichever comes first. 2. You may be advised that it is safe to leave your shelter for short periods of time to locate food, water and medical care. 3. Electrical, water and other utilities may be severely disrupted or unavailable. Following the detonation, sheltering from radioactive fallout for up to 14 days is critically important Public may need to briefly leave their shelters to locate essential supplies and equipment Emergency Management will assess residual radiation levels and advise when sheltering can be discontinued 1. Listen to local AM-FM radio stations for official information. 2. Cell phone, television, radio and internet services will be severely disrupted or unavailable. 3. Small portable walkie-talkies may give you communication with nearby shelters. Thompson Rivers University CMNS 4240 Strategies in Crisis Communication Paper Local AM-FM broadcast radio is most survivable and may be useful in advising the public post-detonation Other communication technologies may be damaged by weapons effects such as EMP 1 FRS 2 and GMRS radios are widely available in the community and may be useful in keeping people in communication with one another EMP = Electromagnetic Pulse FRS = Family Radio Service (unlicensed); GMRS = General Mobile Radio Service (licensed) 3949 Diamond Head Road · Honolulu ·Hawaii · 96816 Telephone (808) 733-4300 HI-EMA. (2018 Jan. 19) FAQs Related to the Ballistic Missile False Alert (Updated 1.31.2018). Hawaii Department of Defense. https://dod.hawaii.gov/hiema/faqsrelated-to-the-ballistic-missile-false-alert/ What reports have been released so far that are related to the ballistic missile false alert on January 13, 2018? These are the actions that HI-EMA has already taken. 1. On the recommendations of the HI-EMA Administrator, Vern Miyagi, the Governor has suspended all future drills until HI-EMA has completed a full analysis of the event. 2. HI-EMA has already instituted a two-person activation/verification rule for tests as well as actual missile launch notifications. 3. A cancellation command that can be done automatically that can be triggered within seconds of an error, has been put in place. Why didn’t I hear the sirens on Saturday? What if I’m worried about sirens in my area? The state sirens were not activated because it was a false alarm. Some military bases activated their sirens, which residents living in those areas may have heard. The outdoor warning sirens are one part of a three-component emergency notification system. A simultaneous test of the Emergency Alert System is conducted with the siren system, in cooperation with Hawaii’s broadcast industry. In the event of a real emergency, warning sirens and Emergency Alert Broadcasts would be joined by alerts via the Wireless Emergency Alert system, which delivers sound-and-text warnings to mobile telephones and compatible devices. If you don’t have a siren in your area, you will receive an alert by one of these other methods. Although most people received the text alert the audio sirens did not sound, is that a good indication of a false alarm? In actual event, the sirens would be activated. It’s an indicator, but you should await an official announcement to indicate a false alarm. Why didn’t my cell phone receive the alert message? We are aware of reports that some people did not receive alerts on their cell phone. We are working with cell carriers to determine why this occurred. We also encourage anyone who did not receive the alert to check and make sure the feature is not turned off on your cell phone. Where do I go for timely updated information when there is an emergency alert? [There are] alert notifications available for your phone. These systems are used to send updates during emergency situations. HI-EMA and the counties also have official social media accounts on such platforms as Facebook and Twitter. Visit https://dod.hawaii.gov/hiema/get-ready/ to get alert sign-up and social media information for your county. Wiley, James. (30 Jan. 2018) Presentation on Preliminary Report on Hawaii False Emergency Alert.Thompson Rivers University CMNS 4240 Strategies in Crisis Communication Paper Federal Communications Commission. …According to a written statement from the day shift warning officer who initiated the alert, as relayed to the Bureau by the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency, the day shift warning officer heard “this is not a drill” but did not hear “exercise, exercise, exercise.” According to the written statement, this day shift warning officer therefore believed that the missile threat was real. At 8:07 a.m., this officer responded by transmitting a live incoming ballistic missile alert to the State of Hawaii. The day shift warning officer used software to send the alert. Specifically, they selected the template for a live alert from a drop-down menu containing various live- and test- alert templates. The alert origination software then prompted the warning officer to confirm whether they wanted to send the message. The prompt read, “Are you sure that you want to send this Alert?” Other warning officers who heard the recording in the watch center report that they knew that the erroneous incoming message did not indicate a real missile threat, but was supposed to indicate the beginning of an exercise. Specifically, they heard the words: “exercise, exercise, exercise.” The day shift warning officer seated at the alert origination terminal, however, reported to the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency after the event their belief that this was a real emergency, so they clicked “yes” to transmit the alert. Because we’ve not been able to interview the day shift warning officer who transmitted the false alert, we’re not in a position to fully evaluate the credibility of their assertion that they believed there was an actual missile threat and intentionally sent the live alert (as opposed to believing that it was a drill and accidentally sending out the live alert). But it is worth noting that they accurately recalled after the event that the announcement did say “This is not a drill.” At 8:08 a.m., the mobile device of the warning officer who transmitted the alert sounded Emergency Alert – providing the first indication to those in the watch center that an actual alert had been transmitted to the public. At 8:09 a.m., State Adjutant Major General Joe Logan, Director of the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency, notified Hawaii Governor David Ige that the agency had transmitted a false alert. At 8:10 a.m., the Director of the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency communicated to United States Pacific Command that there was no missile launch, confirming what Pacific Command already knew. The Hawaii Emergency Management Agency also notified the Honolulu Police Department that there was no missile launch. At 8:12 a.m., the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency used its alert origination software to cancel retransmission of the false alert. The cancellation is an instruction to downstream Emergency Alert System and Wireless Emergency Alert system equipment to cease retransmission. Notably, a cancellation message does not generate an “all clear” message. It also does not “recall” messages that have already been transmitted and displayed on televisions or mobile phones. From 8:13 a.m. to 8:26 a.m., the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency conducted outreach to Hawaii’s county emergency management agencies and radio and TV stations to inform them that the alarm was false. The agency’s phone lines also became congested with incoming calls from the public asking about the nature of the alert that they just received. Some calls to the agency did not get through. Thompson Rivers University CMNS 4240 Strategies in Crisis Communication Paper The agency also notified its staff of the false alert so that they could help to respond to community inquiries. CNN (15 Jan. 2018) Hawaii to Change Protocol After False Missile Alert. SARA SIDNER, CNN CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): At 8:07, the warning message went out on television, on radio, and via text message saying ballistic missile threat inbound to Hawaii, seek shelter, this is not a drill. State Representative Matt LoPresti’s family was enjoying a relaxed Saturday morning. Suddenly they were worrying about nuclear annihilation. The family gathered in a bathroom and began praying. Panic ensued. Students ran for cover on campus. For 38 minutes, citizens had no idea the message was sent by mistake. (On camera): Inside Diamond Head Crater, in this bunker, is where the state warning point is. This is where the mistake originated. An officer brought the wrong template up on the computer and then the computer asked whether or not you want to send out the message. And someone clicked yes. (Voice-over): It all happened during what was supposed to be a routine drill, the officer who sent the erroneous message to the public has been reassigned during an investigation. Retired army major general Vern Miyagi is the head of the team. (On camera): What would you like to say to those who are angry, who were terrified, whose children were afraid? VERN MIYAGI, HAWAII EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY ADMINISTRATOR: For my side, I just want to say I apologize for this. It should not have happened. We’re taking steps to fix it so it never happens again. SIDNER (voice-over): So why did it take so long to send the false alarm message? Well, that message hadn’t been created. MIYAGI: One thing that we’ve done is that there is a cancellation button right now that will — if we trigger this again, a false alarm, there is a button right there that will cancel it immediately. SIDNER: In the months leading up to the mistake, Hawaii had become the first state in the nation to test its attack alert sirens. It hadn’t done so since the end of the Cold War. The red hot rhetoric between America and North Korea certainly played a role in the renewed effort to prepare the public. The false alarm, though, officials say, was never part of that plan. LOPRESTI: The biggest problem now, Sara, is that are people going to believe the system next time? SIDNER: And that is something that emergency managers are looking into. Drills have been suspended until further notice. … Get a 10 % discount on an order above $ 100 Use the following coupon code : NURSING10

Read more
Enjoy affordable prices and lifetime discounts
Use a coupon FIRST15 and enjoy expert help with any task at the most affordable price.
Order Now Order in Chat

Start off on the right foot this semester. Get expert-written solutions at a 20% discount