WU NURS 6051 Week 3 Nurse Informatics and Specialists

WU NURS 6051 Week 3 Nurse Informatics and Specialists ORDER NOW FOR CUSTOMIZED AND ORIGINAL ESSAY PAPERS ON WU NURS 6051 Week 3 Nurse Informatics and Specialists I sent the attach with all instruction regarding how to respond to 2 students discussion APA style. Apply in citation and refences, see the rubric grading. Tutor should be an expert in MSN Acute APRN (nursing topic). WU NURS 6051 Wk 3 Nurse Informatics and Other Specialists attachment_1 Week 3 NURS Transforming Nursing RESPONDS Respond to at least two of your colleagues * on two different days , offering one or more additional interaction strategies in support of the examples/observations shared or by offering further insight to the thoughts shared about the future of these interactions. Tutor will expand more about In your opinion, what needs to happen to ensure that the strategy is sustainable? Tutor will respond to the 2 students’ discussion ( see rubric for grading) RESPOND : Interaction Between Nurse Informaticists and Other Specialists Student #1 A E Discussion Post (Week 3) COLLAPSE Within my current healthcare organization, I have the daily pleasure of working on several investigational studies. Each of those studies call for the frequent collaboration between study coordinators, data managers, and system/technology specialists. Because of this, I have been able to observe these interactions and can attest to how communication and a meticulous attention to detail tie into a study’s success. One example of this collaboration would be when study coordinators must ensure that they collect all of the correct information that the electronic data capture (EDC) system requires. As identified by Mosier et al. (2017), evidence-based clinical documentation (EBCD) design must be incorporated to guarantee that the final product supports the process of documenting all aspects of patient care. For example, there are typically many clinical and laboratory documentation requirements that make up a study’s framework. In order to meet these requirements, technology specialists tend to “build” pre-filled clinical notes within the electronic medical record (EMR) to aid clinicians and study coordinators in conducting participant visits. Without these pre-filled notes, many study personnel would run the risk of missing valuable information—further making the study difficult to execute. One strategy that I would suggest, if not already implemented at facility, is to plan ahead in order to allow for the traditional back and forth of collaboration. It is beneficial to note that “a protocol, whether experimental or clinical, serves as a navigator that evolves from a basic outline of the study plan to become a qualified research or grant proposal” (Balakumar et al., 2013). In my current organization, I have witnessed a few times when industry requirements posed a rather emergent deadline for getting a study off of the ground. Because of this, many of the elements were overlooked and became issues at a later date. Should a clinical order be missed, a protocol deviation could occur and further jeopardize the study’s credibility and outcome. This is why advance planning is so important—study coordinators must seek the expertise of technology specialists to make sure that all of the required orders are present within the EMR. WU NURS 6051 Wk 3 Nurse Informatics and Other Specialists When it comes to the potential impact that the continued evolution of nursing informatics has on professional interactions, I believe that the emergence of new technologies is a likely outcome. As time goes along, we are bound to see many advancements that ease provider workload and streamline patient care. In my opinion, it is all about innovation and it is our responsibility to ensure that the standard of care continues to climb vertically and not become stagnant. As confirmed by Sipes (2016), there have been many recommendations for developing technology-related knowledge and skills within the workforce of 2020 (p. 255). Professional interactions will likely be affected, because the daily technological requirements will call for specialists to take the lead on many projects due to their knowledge the immeasurable value that they possess. WU NURS 6051 Wk 3 Nurse Informatics and Other Specialists References Balakumar, P., Inamdar, M. N., & Jagadeesh, G. (2013). The critical steps for successful research: The research proposal and scientific writing: (A report on the pre-conference workshop held in conjunction with the 64(th) annual conference of the Indian Pharmaceutical Congress-2012). Journal of pharmacology & pharmacotherapeutics, 4(2), 130–138. https://doi.org/10.4103/0976-500X.110895 Mosier, S., Roberts, W.D., & Englebright, J. (2019). A Systems-Level Method for Developing Nursing Informatics Solutions: The Role of Executive Leadership. JONA: The Journal of Nursing Administration, 49(11), 543-548. Sipes, C. (2016). Project Management: Essential skill of nurse informaticists. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, 225, 252–256. Student #2 F O WU NURS 6051 Week 3 Nurse Informatics and Specialists COLLAPSE Nursing informatics is a modern high-level technical operation of nurses. Nursing informatics require computer skills, information technology, and data each day to successfully evaluate systems, patient care practices, and healthcare initiatives. They analyze data to determine what is working effectively and what is not while using established findings to propose advancements, lead programs, and necessary changes (Mosier et al., 2019). Nursing informatics should work jointly with other professionals in the medical fields, for example doctors, other nurses, occupational therapist, and psychologists, to ensure the quality of care (McGonigle &Mastrain, 2015). Such interactions should be improved by ensuring that nursing informatics provide healthcare to patients in different settings, units, and departments while working with all medical professionals to guarantee successful patient-centered care. WU NURS 6051 Week 3 Nurse Informatics and Specialists Nursing informatics are involved in analyzing data to improve patient care and enable healthcare facilities to establish novel and useful expertise. They research, suggest, and employ new technology while training other health professionals to use such knowledge in answering questions, providing care to patients, and monitoring results (Ng et al., 2018). Contrary to nurses’ traditional tasks that centered only on providing one-on-one care to patients, nursing informatics advocate steps that should be taken to improve patient safety and outcomes in a given department, units, facility, or the entire healthcare system. Some of the projects that could help nursing informatics to improve outcomes and effectiveness in healthcare organizations include enabling all stakeholders to have enhanced access to electronic records, diagnostics, and patient care plans. Some significant nursing informatics projects’ influential stakeholders include all nurses doctors, patients and their family members, the nursing association, lawmakers, and all medical professionals. Enhanced collaboration and communication among stakeholders make it simple to tackle healthcare work flows, facilitate coordination, and improve patient outcomes (McGonigle & Mastrain, 2015). Facilitation of data access will necessitates system integration, which will make information and analysis essential. Another project would be the improvement of clinical strategies, protocols, practices and procedures. Nurse informaticists should regularly gauge and assess how particular care delivery segments are performing while focusing on patient outcomes. They could advocate changes and improvement in poorly performing practices to guarantee positive patient outcomes. Moreover, nurse informaticists should provide training and learning anchored on unbiased data. They should train other health professionals on technology-based aspects and employ data to identify rampant problems in health institutions while consulting on the most successful means of resolving underlying issues (Ng et al., 2018). This will enable nurse informatics to generate highly targeted programs to address existing gaps between capacity and provider anticipations. Projects undertaken by nursing informatics improve healthcare delivery outcomes by enhancing the selection and testing of new health devices that can offer vast quantities of patients’ medical data. Nursing informatics are characteristically positioned to fathom actual worth of data and give suggestions on the best practices of recording, accessing, and using it to ensure quality of care. Engaging them in the choice of valuable health devices will make sure that medical professionals have an added advantage in understanding how technological gadgets can improve diagnostics, care plans, and eventually, patient outcomes. Nursing informatics projects also assist in the reduction of medical errors and unnecessary costs (McGonigle & Mastrin, 2015). Collaboration among nursing informatics, patients and their relatives, doctors, and other health professionals ensures a vast pool of decisions that make all stakeholders well-informed, which helps avoid mistakes. Additionally, the incorporation of regular staff training and development, process enhancement, and application of best practices will ensure the quality of care and prevent patient risks. References McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K.G. (Eds). (2015). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (3rd ed.) Jones &Bartlett Publishers Mosier, S., Roberts, W.D., & Englebright, J. (2019). A systems-level method for developing nursing informatics solutions: The role of executive leadership. JONA: The Journal of Nursing Administration, 49 (11), 543-548. https://doi.org/10.1097/NNA.0000000000000815 Ng, Y.C., Alexander, S., & Frith, K. H. (2018). Integration of mobile health application in health information technology initiatives: Expanding opportunities for nurse participation in population health. CIN: Computers, informatics, Nursing, 36 (5), 209-213. https://doi.org/10.1097/CIN.0000000000000445 THIS IS MY WEEK DISCUSSION SO TUTOR KNOW WHAT I DID Nurse Informaticist Interaction with other Professionals Nursing informatics is increasingly becoming central to nursing and has evolved from a science to a nursing specialty. My experiences of nurse informaticists in the healthcare organization show that these specialists work mainly to support the roles of other professionals. The informaticist’s role is not fixed and continues to change with setting and needs of the healthcare organization. Typically, the informatics team received data on charting systems and used this data to inform clinical decision-making. According to McGonigle and Mastrian (2017), with technology incrementally implemented in nursing, it can be disruptive and the role of the informaticist is to enable bedside nurses to focus on the art of caring while also benefiting from technology use. I observed that the informaticist basically cared for the nurses’ technological needs including training and charting issues. Moreover, to improve the interaction between informaticists and other professionals, it is necessary to consider creating inter professional care teams. While the informaticist works by receiving data from these professionals, they could collaborate better if they were assigned to teams. According to Holden et al. (2018), current practice does not include informaticists as essential members of inter professional teams but should do so due to their role in interacting with data and producing crucial input for decision-making. Inter professional teams are effective in enhancing care outcomes and they need the input of informaticists. In my healthcare organization, informaticists have proved crucial in analyzing and interpreting complex data sets and electronic health records (EHR). To enhance their interaction with other professionals, it is necessary to make informaticists be part of an inter professional team, and keep close loop communications. I propose that informaticists staff meet physically in person during morning huddles with nurses to obtain feed- back and learn how to improve and facilitate the patient care faster, and in a safe way. Another way of bringing everybody’s ideas into perspective to better patient care through electronic health records, I propose also that informaticists do some rounding together with the whole team at bedside. To make my strategies sustainable the nursing units should stick to new rules, again meeting more an continue talking about new approaches. In addition every unit should assign a nurse to review patients charting for consistency. Lastly, the continued evolution of nursing informatics as a specialty and emergence of new technologies will present the demand for more diverse skills among nurse informaticists. As a specialty, informatics is becoming more independent and integral of healthcare processes than before. Informatics teams will be extensively involved in designing and implementing projects hence the need for project management skills (Sipes, 2016). Moreover, more complex technologies will require more skills. For example, nurse informaticists in many organizations currently do not require coding and programming skills. However, with more complex technology, they may do so in the future. Informatics continues to develop and more skills will be required of these nurse specialists. References Holden, R. J., Binkheder, S., Patel, J., & Viernes, S. H. P. (2018). Best practices for health informatician involvement in interprofessional health care teams. Applied Clinical Informatics, 9 (1), 141. McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. G. (2017). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (4th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning Sipes, C. (2016). Project management: Essential skill of nurse informaticists. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, 225 , 252-256. Learning Resources (remember to open resources you can copy and paste the link in the search bar) Required Readings McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. G. (2017). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (4th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning. Chapter 25, “The Art of Caring in Technology-Laden Environments” (pp. 525–535) Chapter 26, “Nursing Informatics and the Foundation of Knowledge” (pp. 537–551) Mosier, S., Roberts, W. D., & Englebright, J. (2019). A Systems-Level Method for Developing Nursing Informatics Solutions: The Role of Executive Leadership. JONA: The Journal of Nursing Administration , 49 (11), 543-548. Ng, Y. C., Alexander, S., & Frith, K. H. (2018). Integration of Mobile Health Applications in Health Information Technology Initiatives: Expanding Opportunities for Nurse Participation in Population Health. CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing , 36 (5), 209-213. Sipes, C. (2016). Project management: Essential skill of nurse informaticists. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, 225 , 252-256. Rubric Detail WU NURS 6051 Week 3 Nurse Informatics and Specialists WU NURS 6051 Week 3 Nurse Informatics and Specialists Excellent Good Fair Poor Main Posting 45 (45%) – 50 (50%) Answers all parts of the discussion question(s) expectations with reflective critical analysis and synthesis of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module and current credible sources. Supported by at least three current, credible sources. Written clearly and concisely with no grammatical or spelling errors and fully adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style. 35 (35%) – 39 (39%) Responds to some of the discussion question(s). One or two criteria are not addressed or are superficially addressed. Is somewhat lacking reflection and critical analysis and synthesis. Somewhat represents knowledge gained from the course readings for the module. Post is cited with two credible sources. Written somewhat concisely; may contain more than two spelling or grammatical errors. Contains some APA formatting errors. 0 (0%) – 34 (34%) Does not respond to the discussion question(s) adequately. Lacks depth or superficially addresses criteria. Lacks reflection and critical analysis and synthesis. Does not represent knowledge gained from the course readings for the module. Contains only one or no credible sources. Not written clearly or concisely. Contains more than two spelling or grammatical errors. Does not adhere to current APA manual writing rules and style. Main Post: Timeliness 10 (10%) – 10 (10%) Posts main post by day 3. 0 (0%) – 0 (0%) 0 (0%) – 0 (0%) Does not post by day 3. First Response 17 (17%) – 18 (18%) Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings. Responds fully to questions posed by faculty. Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources. Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives. Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues. Responses to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed. Response is effectively written in standard, edited English. 13 (13%) – 14 (14%) Response is on topic and may have some depth. Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication. Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed. Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited. 0 (0%) – 12 (12%) Response may not be on topic and lacks depth. Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication. Responses to faculty questions are missing. No credible sources are cited. Second Response 16 (16%) – 17 (17%) Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings. Responds fully to questions posed by faculty. Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources. Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives. Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues. Responses to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed. WU NURS 6051 Week 3 Nurse Informatics and Specialists Response is effectively written in standard, edited English. . 12 (12%) – 13 (13%) Response is on topic and may have some depth. Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication. Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed. Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited. 0 (0%) – 11 (11%) Response may not be on topic and lacks depth. Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication. Responses to faculty questions are missing. No credible sources are cited. Participation 5 (5%) – 5 (5%) Meets requirements for participation by posting on three different days. 0 (0%) – 0 (0%) 0 (0%) – 0 (0%) Does not meet requirements for participation by posting on 3 different days. Total Points: 100 Name: NURS_5051_Module02_Week03_Discussion_Rubric Get a 10 % discount on an order above $ 100 Use the following coupon code : NURSING10

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